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Woman dable axon

Woman dable axon





Valid till 2017/5/25



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Utilizing Axon’s Government Affairs Agencies that partner with Axon can rally support with government officials, Dable, political leaders, business and civic groups for their body-worn camera and CEW programs. Identification of certain genes linked to behaviors or disorders Ex: Walking is another example Nolte p Require: Woman times implementing Axon technologies can be held up by the effort it takes to understand relevant regulation and form the right policy. What causes neurotransmitter release from the axon terminal? Huge brain regions; words stored all over the place.
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Yet, there is hardly any evidence of the prosecutorial utility of Body Worn Video. Join us and discover how to get the most out of your Body-Worn Camera program. What are the distinct roles of the somatic, enteric, sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems? What are the 3 primary divisions of the brain and what major structures are in those division? Come and hear from a panel of agencies that use body cameras as a training tool, ensuring their team is prepared, well trained, and accountable. Receives and processes sensory information except olfaction. This results in greater neural representation in adjacent regions of the somatosensory cortex.

At synapses Open when a ligand neurotransmitter binds Allow ions thru, Changes voltage of cell May also start biochemical cascade within cell Voltage-gated channel: On the axon Open when cell reaches a certain voltage Allow ions in or out Changes voltage of cell 3.

What is an excitatory synapse? What is an inhibitory synapse? For each one, what ion enters the cell? What does that do to the cell? Does it make an action potential more or less likely?

Inhibitory neurotransmitters allow chloride a negatively charged ion into the postsynaptic cell and lead to an inhibitory postsynaptic potential – No makes cell more neg. How do these differ from an action potential?

One has more action potential than the other. What are temporal and spatial summation? What causes neurotransmitter release from the axon terminal? What is the difference between ionotropic and metabotropic receptors?

Gates are almost immediately opened for an ion to flow into cell Meta: A sequence of metabolic actions that are slower and longer – lasting. Where are neurotransmitters made? Large made in soma; small in terminal.

What happens to neurotransmitters when they are released, and how are they cleared from a synapse? The neurotransmitter opens that channel, The channel lets ions into the cell, The ions slightly change the charge of the cell If enough positive ions enter the cell, the cell’s charge is sufficiently changed, and there is an action potential.

Can a neuron release more than 1 neurotransmitter? Can you think of an example of this? Know the common neurotransmitters. What is the most common excitatory neurotransmitter?

What is the most common inhibitory neurotransmitter? What neurotransmitters share a pathway of synthesis? What are the initial precursors the first thing in the synthesis pathway for dopamine, norepinepherine, epinepherine, serotonin and acetylcholine?

Some neurons release more than 1 kind of neurotransmitter Sometimes from the same terminal Sometimes from different terminals: Motor neuron in spinal cord release acetylcholine Ach onto muscle fibers, and other branches of the same axon release both Ach and glutamate onto other spinal cord neurons.

For dopamine and serotonin: Know the terms agonist and antagonist. Agonist A drug that mimics or increases the effects of a neurotransmitter Antagonist Drug that blocks the effects of a neurotransmitter.

How are hormones transported around the body? What types of receptors do hormones use? What brain region controls hormone release from the pituitary gland? What is different between the anterior and posterior pituitary, including what hormones are released from each lobe?

What are some other glands in the body that pituitary hormones influence? Understand the principle of negative feedback in hormone release. What is heritability, how do we study it what are twin and adoption studies Estimates of heritability apply to a certain population at a certain time; they are not absolute.

Identification of certain genes linked to behaviors or disorders Ex: If adopted kids resemble biological parents more than adoptive parents, we assume high heritability “Virtual twins” Children of the same age, with no relation to each other, adopted into home at same time 3.

What are examples of environmental influences on traits with otherwise high heritability? Mice in elevated plus maze Ex. What is a sex-linked gene? Understand the heritability of sex-linked genes. What is a sex-limited gene?

What are examples of each sex-linked and sex-limited? Consider a gene on the X chromosome If a male gets this gene, he will display the trait. If a female has it on 1 X chromosome and not the other, she is a carrier.

Present in both sexes but has an effect only mostly in one sex. Genes for chest hair men, breast size women. What is the multiplier effect? Terms to know and understand: DNA, RNA, gene, chromosome, transcription, translation, homozygous, heterozygous, dominant, recessive.

Copy of one strand of the DNA template for protein 4 nucleotides: Person with identical set of genes on the 2 chromosomes is homozygous for that gene Heterozygous: What types of traits move on to the next generation?

What is natural selection? What are adaptive characteristics? Similarities that we see between species suggests a common ancestor. Differences between species allow us to question what pressures may have caused certain animals to develop certain traits.

The process by which inherited traits that confer a selective advantage increase an animal’s likelihood to survive and reproduce become more prevalent in a population.

The key mechanism of evolution; how species acquires their adaptive characteristics 4. How does genetic variability occur? Why does this new field of research “blur the line between environment and genetics”?

DNA is wrapped around a histone core. Things acetyl groups, methyl groups, etc can get into the structure and loosen or tighten the wound-up DNA. This will make a gene more or less likely to be expressed AND these changes are heritable SO you can alter the probability that a gene will be expressed without actually altering the DNA itself.

How is it that genes can affect behavior? Anything that has mass and occupies space. The study of the composition of matter and the changes that matter undergoes.

The study of all chemicals containing carbon. Study of chemicals that in general do not contain carbon. The study of processes that take place in organisms. The area of study that focuses on the composition of matter.

The area that deals with the mechanism, the rate, and the energy transfer that occurs when matter undergoes a change. The pursuit of chemical knowledge for its own sake. Research that is directed toward a practical goal of application.

The means by which a society provides its members with those things needed and desired. Objects that can bew seen only under magnification. Applies science to the production of biological products of processes, uses techniques that can alter the DNA in living organisms.

A material found in air, water, or soil that is harmful to humans or other organisms. A logical, systematic approach to the solution of a scientific problem. When you use your senses to obtain information you make this.

Manipulated Variable Independent Variable. The variable that you change during an experiment. Responding variable Dependent Variable. The variable that is observed during the experiment. A well tested explanation for a broad set of observations.

Analyze, Calculate, and Evaluate. The world of objects that are large enough to see with the unaided eye. DNA storage in neuron. NREM stage 1 and 2. In the end they all receive the same dose of drug followed by the test so that the degree to which drug disrupts test performance in the two groups can be prepared.

Damaged in Broca’s area causing difficulty with function words such as: Left hemisphere of the brain. Right hemisphere of the brain. The damage was to the medical prefrontal lobe only.

Ah Momma Hit Four Cute Squirrels Over Here amygdala, mammillary body, hippocampus, fornix, cortex of the cingulate gyrus, septum, olfactory bulbs and hypothalamus. Huge brain regions; words stored all over the place.

This sends the brain confusing messages about your body’s position. NTS; nucleus of the tractus solitarius. Movement requires the alternating contraction of opposing sets of muscles called antagonistic muscles.

Red nucleus-midbrain area with output mainly to arms b. Calculates predictable outcomes of actions and plans movement according to those outcomes. Organizes rapid sequence of movements in a specific order; habits.

Integrates information about position and posture of the body; organizes the direction of the movement in space a. Mirror neurons in premotor crtex copying. Globus Pallidus GP – inhibits thalamus.

Patch of tissue in the ectoderm invaginates folds in to become the neural plate 2. This fold pinches off 3. Receiving neuron will either agree by sending out a neurotrophin r remain silent and so it will cause.

Law of specific nerve energies. Receptor cells tells bipolar, bipolar tells ganglion, ganglion tells optic axons of ganglion form optic nerve – which travels to the brain, when optic nerve leaves back eye, that’s blind spot because it contains no receptors.

They control the ability of the ganglion cells to respond to shapes, movements, or other specific aspects of visual stimuli. Less stuff in the way of receptors 2. Color constancy; cortex interferes with color perception and helps you compare info from various parts of the retina to determine brightness and color b.

Combined color theory – all of that. Damage to primary visual cortex. Damage causes visual agnosia. Altering the reflection of sound waves into the middle ear from the outer ear – Helps us to locate the source of a sound.

Makes sense of words. Inferior and medial geniculate tracts. At this time, amniotic fluid will have increased concentrations of alpha-fetoprotein. Dendritic Branching and Environmental Enrichment.

Measurable expansion of neurons has also been shown in humans as a function. Plasticity after Brain Damage. Causes of Brain Damage. A stroke or cerebrovascular accident. Disruption of the sodium-potassium pump leading to the accumulation of potassium ions inside neurons.

The blood is white, and there is slightly darker than normal areas surrounding this, due to local brain swelling. Excess positive ions in the neuron. Can reduce the effects of ischemic strokes but can make hemorrhagic strokes worse.

This results in greater neural representation in adjacent regions of the somatosensory cortex. Interactions and relationships between biotic and abiotic things.

A large area with a certain climate that supports select vegetation. Six basic needs of all living things. Water, oxygen, energy, interactions with living and non-living things, suitable living conditions, and food.

The closest related group of biotic things that can mate and reproduce more of the same kind of living thing. First Nations and Metis web. Everything is alive and has a spirit.

Give back equally to what you take. Substances such as carbohydrates, fats, proteins, vitamins, and minerals that give your body energy and the material needed to move, grow, and repair and maintain the health of a biotic thing.

First Nations and Metis human and wolf relationship. The human and the wolf walk separate but parallel paths. First Nations and Metis entities. Air, earth, fire, and water are alive and interact with one another to form biotic and abiotic things.

Features of a particular region. Ecosystems come in all sizes. Ecosystems need to bring matter and energy into the system and make them continually available to biotic things.

A biotic thing that must find and eat or consume other living things for food. A biotic thing that produces the energy and matter itself that it needs for survival as well as the food and oxygen that all food consumers need for survival.

A consumer that eats primarily meat. A consumer that eats primarily plants and plant-like substances. A consumer that eats other animals and plants. Green plants make their own food to supply the energy and matter that they need for survival.

A pigment in plants that absorbs all colours except for green, which it reflects which is why plants are green. It absorbs light energy from the sun. The process of how plants make their food.

Light energy, carbon dioxide, and water is turned into food sugars and starvhes and oxygen. The process that almost all biotic things use to release the energy stored in their food.

Food sugars and starches and oxygen is turned into carbon dioxide, water, and energy that can be used by all living things. It turns the light energy into chemical energy in plants that biotic things can use for their energy, it provides plants with food that biotic things can use to function properly,, it provides the oxygen need for all biotic things.

Plants and animals that reach newly created land. Carbon-based substances such as plants are changed to become fossil fuels such as coal, oil, and natural gas, which are burned and released into the air as carbon gas.

How water cycles through the ecosystem through evaporation, transpiration, evapotranspiration, condensation, precipitation, and surface runoff, infiltration, and perculation..

How matter cycles through the ecosystem. Soil, sunlight and water from the non-living environment give plants what they need so that they can grow and live their lives. Herbivores eat the plants, and sometimes other consumers eat the herbivores.

Plants and animals grow, produce wastes, reproduce, and die. Scavengers and decomposers eat the waste and remains, breaking down once-living matter into simpler and smaller particles, eventually even breaking down solid skeletons.

Skeletons have chemicals minerals such as calcium, carbon and phosphorus that other biotic things such as plants need to survive. The minerals are abiotic so they are part of the abiotic environment.

A community that is usually stable made up of a varied number of species. Development that meets the needs of the current generation without hindering the ability of future generations to meet their needs.

The predictable pattern of change in ecosystems. A consumer that breaks down or decomposes dead animals and plants. Decomposers can be helpful or harmful. They are used in the making of cheese, wine, vinegar, mining, and the clean up of oil spills.

They are in composers and turn the compost into fertilizer. The process of a creating a new community. A consumer that gets the matter and energy it needs for survival by preying upon other organisms.

A predator that has few or no predators of its own at the top of the food chain. An over-and-over again movement of matter. A diagram that depicts the energy flow in ecosystems. Producers are on the bottom while consumers are on the higher levels of the pyramid.

First Nations and Metis change. The coyote or a trickster causes change. Different species competing for a limited amount of resources. Human activities and ecosystems.

Human activities can change ecosystems. Ways to deal with garbage. Sanitary landfill, compost, recycled waste, incineration, recycling depot, hazardous household waste operation.

Spray bugs, bugs are eaten, bodies decompose, food grown. DDT got on cockroaches, and geckos eat the cockroaches. The geckos suffer nerve damage and move slowly. Cats switch to eating geckos instead of rats.

Cats die from DDT poisoning. With less cats, the rats reproduce quickly and move from the jungle into the villages, bringing fleas that carry a bacterium that causes plague. Each segment of this contains one pair of sensory nerves and one pair of motor nerves.

Grey and White matter. Comprised of nerves that regulate the automatic behaviors of the body heart rate, blood pressure, respiration, digestion, etc. A network of nerves that facilitates energy conservation and storage — “Rest and Digest”.

Both the long pre-ganglionic neurons and the shorter post-ganglionic neurons release acetylcholine. The other branch of the peripheral nervous system. Consists of sensory neurons that convey information from the sense organs to the brain and motor neurons that convey information from the CNS to the muscles.

For control of voluntary movements. Part of the peripheral nervous system. Receives sensory information from, and controls voluntary and involuntary movements of, the face, head and neck.

In the hindbrain it controls sensations from the head, muscle movements in the head, and multiple parasympathetic outputs to organs e. Located in the Hindbrain Lies anterior and ventral to the medulla.

Contains the reticular formation arousal and attention and the raphe system serotonin. Lies dorsal to the medulla. Controls movement, balance, coordination of limbs.

Contains nuclei for cranial nerves and part of the reticular formation. Contains an important group of dopamine neurons. Gives rise to the dopamine-containing pathway that facilitates readiness for movement.

Death of these dopamine neurons is associated with Parkinson’s disease. The most anterior and prominent part of the brain in humans. Consists of the outer cortex cerebral cortex and several subcortical regions.

Several interlinked structures comprise the limbic system. Receives and processes sensory information except olfaction. Sends the output to the cerebral cortex.

Contains several distinct nuclei; widespread connections. Communicates with the pituitary gland to regulate the release of several hormones. Regulates motivated behavior e. Highly conserved across evolution amphibians – mammals.

Important for sequences of behavior and certain aspects of memory and emotional expression. Deteriorates in Parkinson’s and Huntington’s diseases. Provides “cushioning” for the brain. Reservoir of hormones and nutrition for the brain and spinal cord.

Direction of CSF flow: CSF drains from the fourth ventricle into the subarachnoid space. CSF flows through the subarachnoid space and enters the general circulation through arachnoid granulations.

Water on the brain. Caused by inflammation and enlargements of the third and lateral ventricles often due to small cerebral aqueduct. Excess CSF is shunted to abdomen to relieve pressure on the brain.

Meninges are membranes that surround the brain and spinal cord. The brain has no pain receptors, but these do. Swollen blood vessels in the meninges are the cause of these. Swelling associated with meningitis often triggers.

Hallmark signs and symptoms. Most common cause is viral infection of the meninges, but bacterial and fungal infections. Which ear structure vibrates in response to sound passing from the outer ear and down the auditory canal?

Within the sensory system, which two different parallel streams of analysis ultimately influence behavior? With age, some people experience damage to part of the cochlea that results in an inability to perceive high frequencies as well as difficulty distinguishing what people are saying.

Following a stroke, Mrs. Hamilton is unable to recognize her hand as belonging to her body. The neuron fires or does not fire determined on the overall sum. Which class of neurotransmitters is synthesized from a single amino acid and has cell bodies frequently located in the brain stem?

Which of the following is NOT a catecholamine? Mammalian motor neurons conduct action potentials at a speed of meters per second. This synapse mediates presynaptic facilitation and inhibition, which allows for the advantage of selective influence on one particular synapse rather than the entire presynaptic neuron.

A metabotropic receptor binds to its own neurotransmitter molecule and is located on the presynaptic, not postsynaptic, membrane. To terminate a message in the synapse, neurotransmitters are broken apart by the action of proteins that stimulate or inhibit biochemical reactions without being affected by them.

Why do scientists find soluble-gas neurotransmitters difficult to study? Which of the following is NOT one of the three axes of the vertebrate nervous system? Which of the five divisions of the brain is NOT a part of the brain stem?

Neurons are not the only cells found in the nervous system. Kari has had some of this drained away and as a result experiences raging headaches and stabbing pain each time she jerks her head.

Material is rapidly transported throughout neurons. Ramos wants to view a neuron in three dimensions. Komal’s anatomy class is studying major structures of the brain. He is analyzing the tectum, tegmentum, and superior and inferior colliculi.

This part of the brain plays an important role in the regulation of several motivated behaviors, such as eating, sleeping, and sexual behavior. It works in part by regulating hormones secreted by the pituitary gland.

Trisha is studying a mammal that does not have convoluted cortices. A gyrus is a ridge or a hill between fissures and sulci. Which of the following is NOT among the relatively large gyri of the frontal, parietal, and temporal lobes of the brain?

Freezing point is 32 degrees F or 0 degrees C. The 4 nucleotides in DNA. Every electric circuits has 4 parts. What is the electromotive force that pushes electrons through the circuit.

A man named D. Turn pink litmus paper blue. Which of the following is not a property of acids? Conduct electricity in a weak or strong solution. Which of the following is not a property of bases?

They are beginning to develop specialized systems. The biological kingdom Protista can be described by all except which of the following characteristics? Have present and fully functioning systems.

All but which of the following descriptions accurately describes the Fungi biological kingdom? Organisms in the biological plant plantae kingdom contain all except which of the following characteristics?

Are multicellular, eukaryotic, heterotrophic organisms that lack cell walls, Most animals have bodies that are separated into various tissues and contain structures that are unique to each type of organism, Most animals have the capability of being motile at some stage in their life, Animals grow based on hormonal activity and the presence of nutrients.

The Animal kingdom in biological classifications includes which of the following characteristics? Although Aristotle first classified organisms into two groups, plants and animals, subsequent scientists have developed a classification system includes the following levels from largest to smallest: Composed of four chambers, two atria and two ventricles that are controlled by a central pacemaker, Composed of involuntary muscle tissue, Blood pumped out of the heart circulates through two loops, one reaching the lungs and the other all parts of the body, The pacemaker sends signals to the atria and ventricles in order to coordinate their rhythmic pumping activity.

The heart is a muscular organ that can be described by which of the following answer choices? In the last part of the digestive system, the large intestine, used food matter and wastes are further broken down, digested, and excreted.

Which of the following statements does not accurately describe the digestive system? This pressure serves to determine the amount of water kept inside the cell in order to offset the environment outside the cell.

Phosphate groups, Four nitrogenous bases: DNA, the basic chemical of life, is a huge molecule that is comprised of which of the following pick all that apply? Convection currents are the flow that is created due to this heat transfer.

As a fluid is heated, it becomes less dense and rises. Participate in an in-depth conversations to provide your feedback on Axon’s next generation of software products focused on incident reporting, routing and workflows across an agency, and to hear about how we’ve put video at the heart of the record to save officer and reviewer time..

In this session, we’ll get to the bottom of why it’s not simply a convenient business decision by Axon—rather a safety and liability concern. Members of our legal team will be on hand to explain our liability policy and the numbers behind this important recommendation, as well as answer your questions.

Law enforcement officials live by their training. The public often views video as the judge and jury in assigning wrongdoing, ignoring the lead-up or off-camera events prior to recording.

From drafting key messages to prepping your media spokesperson, this deep-dive session will touch upon all the tactics needed for a successful launch. Tell the story you want to tell—and be prepared for every response.

Imagine a nightmare scenario: If there is body-worn camera footage of the incident, should you release it? How do the needs and demands of the public fit in with your public relations and with the media’s increasing demand for camera footage, not to mention the rights of victims and suspects alike?

Axon understands that these questions have come to the forefront of politics and policing and need to be covered. This seminar discusses the politics behind media and body-worn camera footage and provides an overview of the thorny political realities that most agencies will, at one time or another, be forced to face.

In recent years artificial intelligence AI technologies have advanced significantly. From image recognition to language understanding, these technologies are changing our lives and businesses, and law enforcement will be no exception.

At Axon, we are working on integrating AI into all of our product and service offerings, and we are committed in doing so ethically and responsibly. In this talk, we will introduce AI and the initiatives that Axon is taking in this area.

Law enforcement is challenged by the public’s opinions of them both good and bad—making recruiting new talent and keeping the best a huge task. During this session, a panel of Chiefs provides insights on what’s worked for their agencies and how they’ve motivated new talent to stick around.

Most agencies with body-worn camera programs list redaction as one of the greatest challenges they face. That’s why we’ve released the Redaction Studio, one of our latest improvements to Evidence.

In this workshop, you’ll learn about Redaction Studio’s new features and see how it simplifies processing and redacting video in real-time redactions. Capturing evidence doesn’t just happen on body-worn cameras.

Join our experts in a discussion about using in-car cameras for more than capturing video. Learn how AI can be used for a variety of vehicle applications and what are the most valuable applications for law enforcement agencies.

Video evidence can be invaluable—but only if it can be easily logged and found. Participants will gain valuable insight into how evidence can be managed most effectively and how data accuracy can be improved.

Learn about the most impactful security practices that can be employed without expensive software or consultants. Join Superintendent Ian Drummond-Smith from Devon and Cornwall Police as he discusses the key aspects that set their use and policies apart from the rest of the world.

When the Budget People Say ‘No’: Purchasing much-needed equipment for your agency can unleash a host of procurement, policy, and political issues. When you’re hitting hurdle after hurdle, it’s important to have a partner who understands how to create win-win contracts.

In this session, we’ll share some of the programs and strategies that we’ve used to help agencies secure the budget they need for a successful TASER program. Information moves fast—your response has to be faster.

In this day and age, information is instantaneous and media consumers get immediate news coverage from their TVs, computers, and phones. To ensure that your response can be just as immediate as the news coverage itself, it’s crucial that you and your agency have the best possible preparation for media interaction, questions, and interviews already established.

How will you respond during a crisis? They will discuss strategies on how to break down data silos to free up information across an organization and what changes have led to NIBRS becoming the new standard to produce better crime data.

Join us to learn more about Axon’s interview room recording system. During this session, Product Manager Robert Murphy will get you up to speed on Axon Interview, including an overview of the product, what makes up its core features, how it integrates with Evidence.

Cameras catch officers doing incredible things, but what do you do when they do not follow policy? Come and hear from a panel of agencies that use body cameras as a training tool, ensuring their team is prepared, well trained, and accountable.

When deploying a new technology there can be bumps along the way. Join a panel of agencies that have deployed drones and are successfully using them at their agencies to discuss what they would’ve wanted to know before they got started.

They will discuss the future of their programs and the benefits they have seen. If you have limited exposure to Evidence. We’ll provide attendees with an overview of the fundamentals of our digital evidence management system, so you can return to your agency with confidence.

Learn how to solve some of the most frequently asked questions, such as resetting passwords, changing security info, and understanding Evidence. Physical security still matters-even in the digital age.

Learn how physical security is often overlooked and the common failures you walk past every day. More importantly, learn how we can better protect ourselves and our infrastructure. Participate in an in-depth conversations to provide your feedback on Axon’s next generation of software products focused on incident reporting, routing and workflows across an agency, and to hear about how we’ve put video at the heart of the record to save officer and reviewer time.

Getting officers comfortable with their CEWs starts with them firing training cartridges. As part of our commitment to making it easier for officers to train and practice, we’re rolling out a new training suit and cartridges.

Featuring soft-contact, hook-and-loop technology, the new system makes pin prick injuries impossible and helps ensure OSHA compliance. This session will give attendees an up-close look at the new cartridges and suit, even allowing them to try it for themselves.

One of the most important jobs for members of law enforcement is establishing trust with the public. Historically, law enforcement leadership has been predominantly male.

Thanks to persistence, talent, and perseverance, more and more women rise through the ranks of public safety. First Responders and trauma go hand-in-hand. Therefore, bringing about awareness and understanding the inevitable exposure and potential adverse affects are critical to the individual and agency alike.

This presentation is a first-hand account of an officer’s exposure to both cumulative and acute trauma. Sergeant Christopher Scallon recounts his experiences that will take the audience on his personal journey from an enthusiastic rookie to a damaged cop diagnosed with PTSD and severe depression to a mental health advocate providing a map to resiliency and support for all first responders.

Body worn video, in-car video, interview footage, and other forms of digital data provide valuable evidence in your criminal trials; but what are the legal and foundational requirements for admitting this evidence?

This session will provide you with a working knowledge of the preparation, chain of custody, and foundational predicate questions necessary for successful use of digital evidence in a criminal trial.

Whether your intention is to install body worn video, facial recognition or a new records management system, it’s essential for you and your agency to be prepared for important cultural shifts.

And because every project has the potential to advance your agency’s approach to efficiency and effeciveness in broader ways, it’s important to approach every project stategically.

Something in the water? Nope-just a great campaign. Utilizing using cops, cats and comedy to promote diversity and attract more recruits through a viral video. Learn how the New Zealand Police Department managed to boost recruitment significantly with a viral campaign even in a time when police recruitment is at an all time low.

But what happens after that? How do you ensure your program will be successful and deliver value for money to your department and your community? Acting Inspector Wayne Hutchings managed the largest rollout of body worn cameras in Australia, introducing over body worn cameras to the Queensland Police Service.

The department structured their entire rollout around and evaluation plan underpinned by sound research methodologies. They also conducted several internal audits reviewing the deployment of body worn cameras and Evidence.

Acting Inspector Hutchings will lead us through those processes and how the various evaluation and audit report recommendations are being used to continue to shape their program towards a path to success.

In the heat of the moment, law enforcement officials need to focus on what’s happening around them—not their technology. Our Axon Signal technology helps users capture vital footage without worrying about their cameras.

In this session, we’ll demo our various Axon Signal products and offer attendees insights into how agencies have used the products in the field. Our digital evidence management system Evidence.

In this session, we’ll cover the five things we’ve found agencies should do, but aren’t currently doing, on Evidence. You’ve heard about Evidence. Join Axon’s technical team as they dive into how you can leverage it for user management, reporting, and compliance.

By the end of the session, you’ll be prepared to get started. As part of our efforts in weapons technology innovation, we’d like to share the latest advancements and give you a preview of where this product line is headed in the future.

Session attendees will have the opportunity to learn about how TASER devices have evolved over time, hold our Smart Weapons in their hands, and ask questions about specific features or training recommendations.

If you’ve ever wondered how we test our TASER devices to ensure they are field-ready, this session is for you. We’ll show you the function tests we perform in-house, plus share data from top third-party studies that attest to the safety of our CEWs.

We’ll also share a few anecdotes of how our weapons withstood some intense field conditions. The decisions you make before, during, and after a crisis can help determine how well you weather a PR storm.

Learn how to respond to a PR fire without fanning the flames and even turn a negative incident into a positive win for your agency. AI and machine learning are hot topics right now, but what do they mean for you?

Networks like FirstNet will take the value of those capabilities further than ever before. However, the communications equipment required for those network capabilities is required and can be cumbersome and costly to install, oftentimes leaving the fleets in disarray after their useful life.

During this roundtable, Captain Lanava from Bay City Police Department will explore the various purchasing vehicles available for your body camera program, Fleet deployment, or Interview Room solutions.

By the end of the session, you’ll have a better understanding of how each of them works and how to explain the differences to your purchasing agents. Finally, you’ll be able to determine the best fit for your agency.

One of the most logical ways in which body cameras are able to help law enforcement agencies, is by documenting incidents and subsequently using the recordings to arrest, prosecute and convict suspects.

Yet, there is hardly any evidence of the prosecutorial utility of Body Worn Video. Join us to discuss the research that is currently being done. Two-party consent is required in 11 states—meaning audio recording must have mute functionality.

One of the new features of our body-worn cameras is the ability to mute the video. During this seminar, you’ll hear from an expert who will outline the pros and cons of each side of the argument and what your agency should be considering to stay compliant.

Currently, gathering evidence is spread across multiple devices and technology sources. Join us and learn how Broward County is simplifying evidence collection with their smartphones and Axon Capture.

AI is our most powerful technology, and in the coming decades it will change everything. How will we harness and handle AI-powered automation and machines that can outperform us in many aspects of our lives?

While the concept of superintelligent machines may sound like sci-fi, human-level AI could bring about tremendous advancements for society. But, its impact requires us to think about and prepare for this future.

Join technologist Calum Chace as he discusses the prospects and challenges that lie ahead. Transparency, Trust, and Accountability Ireland. Come and learn how she is taking best practices and innovation over seas to impact Ireland.

Drones are just the beginning. The future of security technology is happening in real time. Learn about the coming security challenges facing your agency and how to start preparing now.

Participate in an in-depth conversation to provide your feedback on Axon’s strategies related to bundling and subscription plans. In this session, we’ll take an in-depth look at the types of data that our CEWs can report and how to interpret that data for a clearer picture of deployment events—whether for IA or court purposes.

We’ll also show you how you can use Evidence Sync to upload weapon data and manage it using Evidence. Public safety is a shared responsibility between community stakeholders and law enforcement.

In order to solve problems and build lasting solutions, agencies need to establish positive working relationships with community groups, businesses, non-profits, and private citizens.

Axon’s vision is bigger than just cameras or weapons. We’re working every day to build a network that protects life. To make this a reality, we live and breathe six core values that serve as guiding principles.

Join Axon President, Luke Larson, as he discusses the core values of Axon and what that means to you as a customer. Homelessness is a complex issue—one that requires compassion as it does resolve.

The national ‘best practices’ and methods that see true results have to engage the community and have a complete “public-private” partnership. In this session, we’ll provide sessiongoers with the latest on our upcoming product, including a new demo.

Your jurisdiction is about to start a body worn camera program. How will the police and prosecutors work together to make it a success? What steps will you need to take to effectively handle body worn camera videos from the crime scene to the courtroom?

Join Axon in a moderated interview with an agency that is using their drones more than any other agency in the county. They will discuss obstacles they’ve encountered and how they are able to deploy their drones within minutes of receiving receiving a call.

How to Successfully Implement Axon Interview Room Implementing any new technology at your agency can be challenging—and when both hardware and software are involved those challenges are compounded.

Live Streaming Voice of Customer Session The next generation of connected cameras is being built and we want your input. The Implications around Body-Worn Camera Footage Releases When it comes to sharing content with the community, law enforcement agencies have to tread a fine line.

Keeping The Super Heroes Super Public safety professionals are passionate about serving others, yet that commitment can take its toll. Public Evidence Submission in 3 Clicks: An Axon Citizen Demo Collecting and managing digital evidence has become a top concern for agencies especially during high-profile cases or major crises.

Unleashing the Power of Unconditional Respect Policing organizations deliver essentially identical services to communities, but the way that these services are delivered and received can differ drastically from community to community.

Anatomy of an Attack: RMS Voice of Customer Session articipate in an in-depth conversations to provide your feedback on Axon’s next generation of software products focused on incident reporting, routing and workflows across an agency, and to hear about how we’ve put video at the heart of the record to save officer and reviewer time.

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What is a ganglion? What is the different types of glial cells and their functions. What does it keep out, let in? What are the implications of this for drug use and medicine?

They must be able to pass the BBB. Know the parts of a synapse presynaptic cell terminal, postsynaptic cell dendrite or dendritic spine, synaptic cleft. What are Radial glia? In adulthood there are 2 types, one in white matter and one in gray matter.

When there is damage, the microglia proliferate, migrate to the point of damage, turn into macrophages, and devour debris and pathogens. When a PNS nerve is cut, the axons regrow thru the Schwann cell tube.

What is gray matter? What are some similarities and differences between human brains and the brains of other mammals? Overall brain size Size of individual parts Neocortex primates Olfactory bulb rodents Auditory cortex bats Muscles and sense organs of forelimbs monkeys.

What are the 3 primary divisions of the brain and what major structures are in those division? What comprises the brainstem? For the following brain structures, be able to identify them on a midline section of the brain, and know generally what they do: How many are there?

What is The Binding Problem? Binding occurs if you perceive 2 sensations happening at the same time and in the same place. Used to think association cortex What is in them?

What are the meninges and what is the general function of the meninges? Be able to locate the lobes of the cortex and give functions associated with each. Included in this, be sure that you can locate motor cortex, somatosensory cortex, auditory cortex, visual cortex, prefrontal cortex.

Frontal Lobe Prefrontal cortex: Broca’s area Parietal Lobe Somatosensory cortex First cortex to process somatosensory info Proprioception too Somatotopic organization Spatial organization Especially in non-dominant hemisphere side where language is not What is a midbrain?

What is a forebrain? What is in the cortex? What is the hindbrain? What consists the brainstem? What does the medulla do? What controlls the medulla? Control via cranial nerves sensory and motor control of head and parasympathetic output to organs vagus nerve.

What does midbrain do? What does a cerebellum do? What does the hypothamus do? What does the pituitary gland? What does the pineal gland do? What does the basal ganglia do? Know the parts of the spinal cord dorsal horn, ventral horn, dorsal root, ventral root, central canal, dorsal root ganglion.

Be able to label them on a figure. Know the Bell-Magendie law and understand how that incorporates the dorsal and ventral horns and roots. Understand that a spinal nerve has a sensory and a motor component,.

Could you recognize what a sensory neuron looks like compared to what a motor neuron looks like? What disease is associated with them? Generally speaking, what is a reflex?

Describe the stretch reflex. How are reflexes “modifiable”? Involuntary, stereotyped response to a sensory input 2. Muscle contraction in response to stretch Monosynaptic Reciprocal inhibition 3.

BUT gamma motor neurons to quads decrease firing rate when we sit decrease excitability of quad spindles. Walking is another example Nolte p Require: How is the PNS subdivided? What are the distinct roles of the somatic, enteric, sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems?

In the somatic nervous system, it takes just 1 neuron to get from the spinal cord to a muscle middle neuron below. Axons activate organs for “fight or flight” 4.

Facilitates vegetative, nonemergency functions Para means “beside” or “related to”; opposite action of sympathetic NS. Understand the differences between the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems in terms of 1 when each one is activated, 2 placement of ganglia as well as location of preganglionic neurons, 3 length of fibers, 4 neurotransmitters used, 5 physiological effects.

What ions are important in the action potential? When the cell is at rest, which ions are most highly concentrated inside of the cell, and which ones are most highly concentrated outside of the cell?

Understand the forces working on the ions electrical gradient and concentration gradient. What is a voltage-gated channel? On the axon Open when cell reaches a certain voltage Allow ions in or out Changes voltage of cell.

Understand the steps of the action potential, and how one leads to the next. The membrane at that node is now mV VG sodium channels open sodium rushes in. The sodium inside the cell diffuses to the next node of Ranvier How is an action potential started and propagated?

What ion enters first? The sodium inside the cell diffuses to the next node of Ranvier. Thru what type of channel does it enter? What forces drive it inside? Why does that channel close?

What channel opens next? What ion moves thru that? What forces drive that ion? VG potassium channels open potassium rushes out. Terms to know and understand with regard to neurophysiology: Because of unequal distribution of ions, the inside of the cell is negatively charged compared to outside the cell.

As cell becomes less negative, it is 3. As cell becomes more negative, it is 4. The critical level of depolarization that must be achieved to trigger an action potential. What does it do?

What purpose does it serve? With regard to those last 2 terms, What voltage is resting potential? What voltage is threshold? Where must threshold be reached for an action potential to occur?

The critical level of depolarization that must be achieved to trigger an action potential 4. What is the purpose of myelin? What happens at the nodes of Ranvier?

What is saltatory conduction? In Myelinated axons, action potential can “jump” down axon. Allows long distance rapid communication 2. While rate can change, speed cannot!! What does it mean that an action potential is “all or none”?

That is, in most but not all neurons, subthreshold depolarizations have no effect, but once the threshold is crossed, an action potential is generated. Know the different parts of a synapse presynaptic cell, postsynaptic cell, synaptic cleft, neurotransmitters, receptors, vesicles.

Know what happens at a synapse chemical transmission. Understand different types of ion channels ligand – and voltage-gated. Where are ligand-gated channels located?

What is a “ligand”? At synapses Open when a ligand neurotransmitter binds Allow ions thru, Changes voltage of cell May also start biochemical cascade within cell Voltage-gated channel: On the axon Open when cell reaches a certain voltage Allow ions in or out Changes voltage of cell 3.

What is an excitatory synapse? What is an inhibitory synapse? For each one, what ion enters the cell? What does that do to the cell? Does it make an action potential more or less likely?

Inhibitory neurotransmitters allow chloride a negatively charged ion into the postsynaptic cell and lead to an inhibitory postsynaptic potential – No makes cell more neg.

How do these differ from an action potential? One has more action potential than the other. What are temporal and spatial summation? What causes neurotransmitter release from the axon terminal?

What is the difference between ionotropic and metabotropic receptors? Gates are almost immediately opened for an ion to flow into cell Meta: A sequence of metabolic actions that are slower and longer – lasting.

Where are neurotransmitters made? Large made in soma; small in terminal. What happens to neurotransmitters when they are released, and how are they cleared from a synapse? The neurotransmitter opens that channel, The channel lets ions into the cell, The ions slightly change the charge of the cell If enough positive ions enter the cell, the cell’s charge is sufficiently changed, and there is an action potential.

Can a neuron release more than 1 neurotransmitter? Can you think of an example of this? Know the common neurotransmitters. What is the most common excitatory neurotransmitter?

What is the most common inhibitory neurotransmitter? What neurotransmitters share a pathway of synthesis? What are the initial precursors the first thing in the synthesis pathway for dopamine, norepinepherine, epinepherine, serotonin and acetylcholine?

Some neurons release more than 1 kind of neurotransmitter Sometimes from the same terminal Sometimes from different terminals: Motor neuron in spinal cord release acetylcholine Ach onto muscle fibers, and other branches of the same axon release both Ach and glutamate onto other spinal cord neurons.

For dopamine and serotonin: Know the terms agonist and antagonist. Agonist A drug that mimics or increases the effects of a neurotransmitter Antagonist Drug that blocks the effects of a neurotransmitter.

How are hormones transported around the body? What types of receptors do hormones use? What brain region controls hormone release from the pituitary gland? What is different between the anterior and posterior pituitary, including what hormones are released from each lobe?

What are some other glands in the body that pituitary hormones influence? Understand the principle of negative feedback in hormone release. What is heritability, how do we study it what are twin and adoption studies Estimates of heritability apply to a certain population at a certain time; they are not absolute.

Identification of certain genes linked to behaviors or disorders Ex: If adopted kids resemble biological parents more than adoptive parents, we assume high heritability “Virtual twins” Children of the same age, with no relation to each other, adopted into home at same time 3.

What are examples of environmental influences on traits with otherwise high heritability? Mice in elevated plus maze Ex. What is a sex-linked gene? Understand the heritability of sex-linked genes.

What is a sex-limited gene? What are examples of each sex-linked and sex-limited? Consider a gene on the X chromosome If a male gets this gene, he will display the trait.

If a female has it on 1 X chromosome and not the other, she is a carrier. Present in both sexes but has an effect only mostly in one sex. Genes for chest hair men, breast size women. What is the multiplier effect?

Terms to know and understand: DNA, RNA, gene, chromosome, transcription, translation, homozygous, heterozygous, dominant, recessive. Copy of one strand of the DNA template for protein 4 nucleotides: Person with identical set of genes on the 2 chromosomes is homozygous for that gene Heterozygous: What types of traits move on to the next generation?

What is natural selection? What are adaptive characteristics? Similarities that we see between species suggests a common ancestor. Differences between species allow us to question what pressures may have caused certain animals to develop certain traits.

The process by which inherited traits that confer a selective advantage increase an animal’s likelihood to survive and reproduce become more prevalent in a population. The key mechanism of evolution; how species acquires their adaptive characteristics 4.

How does genetic variability occur? Why does this new field of research “blur the line between environment and genetics”? DNA is wrapped around a histone core.

Things acetyl groups, methyl groups, etc can get into the structure and loosen or tighten the wound-up DNA. This will make a gene more or less likely to be expressed AND these changes are heritable SO you can alter the probability that a gene will be expressed without actually altering the DNA itself.

How is it that genes can affect behavior? Anything that has mass and occupies space. The study of the composition of matter and the changes that matter undergoes. The study of all chemicals containing carbon.

Study of chemicals that in general do not contain carbon. The study of processes that take place in organisms. The area of study that focuses on the composition of matter. The area that deals with the mechanism, the rate, and the energy transfer that occurs when matter undergoes a change.

The pursuit of chemical knowledge for its own sake. Research that is directed toward a practical goal of application. The means by which a society provides its members with those things needed and desired.

Objects that can bew seen only under magnification. Applies science to the production of biological products of processes, uses techniques that can alter the DNA in living organisms. A material found in air, water, or soil that is harmful to humans or other organisms.

A logical, systematic approach to the solution of a scientific problem. When you use your senses to obtain information you make this. Manipulated Variable Independent Variable.

The variable that you change during an experiment. Responding variable Dependent Variable. The variable that is observed during the experiment. A well tested explanation for a broad set of observations.

Analyze, Calculate, and Evaluate. The world of objects that are large enough to see with the unaided eye. DNA storage in neuron. NREM stage 1 and 2. In the end they all receive the same dose of drug followed by the test so that the degree to which drug disrupts test performance in the two groups can be prepared.

Damaged in Broca’s area causing difficulty with function words such as: Left hemisphere of the brain. Right hemisphere of the brain. The damage was to the medical prefrontal lobe only. Ah Momma Hit Four Cute Squirrels Over Here amygdala, mammillary body, hippocampus, fornix, cortex of the cingulate gyrus, septum, olfactory bulbs and hypothalamus.

Huge brain regions; words stored all over the place. This sends the brain confusing messages about your body’s position. NTS; nucleus of the tractus solitarius.

Movement requires the alternating contraction of opposing sets of muscles called antagonistic muscles. Red nucleus-midbrain area with output mainly to arms b.

Calculates predictable outcomes of actions and plans movement according to those outcomes. Organizes rapid sequence of movements in a specific order; habits.

Integrates information about position and posture of the body; organizes the direction of the movement in space a. Mirror neurons in premotor crtex copying. Globus Pallidus GP – inhibits thalamus.

Patch of tissue in the ectoderm invaginates folds in to become the neural plate 2. This fold pinches off 3. Receiving neuron will either agree by sending out a neurotrophin r remain silent and so it will cause.

Law of specific nerve energies. Receptor cells tells bipolar, bipolar tells ganglion, ganglion tells optic axons of ganglion form optic nerve – which travels to the brain, when optic nerve leaves back eye, that’s blind spot because it contains no receptors.

They control the ability of the ganglion cells to respond to shapes, movements, or other specific aspects of visual stimuli. Less stuff in the way of receptors 2. Color constancy; cortex interferes with color perception and helps you compare info from various parts of the retina to determine brightness and color b.

Combined color theory – all of that. Damage to primary visual cortex. Damage causes visual agnosia. Altering the reflection of sound waves into the middle ear from the outer ear – Helps us to locate the source of a sound.

Makes sense of words. Inferior and medial geniculate tracts. At this time, amniotic fluid will have increased concentrations of alpha-fetoprotein. Dendritic Branching and Environmental Enrichment.

Measurable expansion of neurons has also been shown in humans as a function. Plasticity after Brain Damage. Causes of Brain Damage. A stroke or cerebrovascular accident. Disruption of the sodium-potassium pump leading to the accumulation of potassium ions inside neurons.

The blood is white, and there is slightly darker than normal areas surrounding this, due to local brain swelling. Excess positive ions in the neuron. Can reduce the effects of ischemic strokes but can make hemorrhagic strokes worse.

This results in greater neural representation in adjacent regions of the somatosensory cortex. Interactions and relationships between biotic and abiotic things.

A large area with a certain climate that supports select vegetation. Six basic needs of all living things. Water, oxygen, energy, interactions with living and non-living things, suitable living conditions, and food.

The closest related group of biotic things that can mate and reproduce more of the same kind of living thing. First Nations and Metis web. Everything is alive and has a spirit.

Give back equally to what you take. Substances such as carbohydrates, fats, proteins, vitamins, and minerals that give your body energy and the material needed to move, grow, and repair and maintain the health of a biotic thing.

First Nations and Metis human and wolf relationship. The human and the wolf walk separate but parallel paths. First Nations and Metis entities. Air, earth, fire, and water are alive and interact with one another to form biotic and abiotic things.

Features of a particular region. Ecosystems come in all sizes. Ecosystems need to bring matter and energy into the system and make them continually available to biotic things.

A biotic thing that must find and eat or consume other living things for food. A biotic thing that produces the energy and matter itself that it needs for survival as well as the food and oxygen that all food consumers need for survival.

A consumer that eats primarily meat. A consumer that eats primarily plants and plant-like substances. A consumer that eats other animals and plants. Green plants make their own food to supply the energy and matter that they need for survival.

A pigment in plants that absorbs all colours except for green, which it reflects which is why plants are green. It absorbs light energy from the sun. The process of how plants make their food.

Light energy, carbon dioxide, and water is turned into food sugars and starvhes and oxygen. The process that almost all biotic things use to release the energy stored in their food. Food sugars and starches and oxygen is turned into carbon dioxide, water, and energy that can be used by all living things.

It turns the light energy into chemical energy in plants that biotic things can use for their energy, it provides plants with food that biotic things can use to function properly,, it provides the oxygen need for all biotic things.

Plants and animals that reach newly created land. Carbon-based substances such as plants are changed to become fossil fuels such as coal, oil, and natural gas, which are burned and released into the air as carbon gas.

How water cycles through the ecosystem through evaporation, transpiration, evapotranspiration, condensation, precipitation, and surface runoff, infiltration, and perculation..

How matter cycles through the ecosystem. Soil, sunlight and water from the non-living environment give plants what they need so that they can grow and live their lives.

Herbivores eat the plants, and sometimes other consumers eat the herbivores. Plants and animals grow, produce wastes, reproduce, and die. Scavengers and decomposers eat the waste and remains, breaking down once-living matter into simpler and smaller particles, eventually even breaking down solid skeletons.

Skeletons have chemicals minerals such as calcium, carbon and phosphorus that other biotic things such as plants need to survive. The minerals are abiotic so they are part of the abiotic environment.

A community that is usually stable made up of a varied number of species. Development that meets the needs of the current generation without hindering the ability of future generations to meet their needs.

The predictable pattern of change in ecosystems. A consumer that breaks down or decomposes dead animals and plants. Decomposers can be helpful or harmful. They are used in the making of cheese, wine, vinegar, mining, and the clean up of oil spills.

They are in composers and turn the compost into fertilizer. The process of a creating a new community. A consumer that gets the matter and energy it needs for survival by preying upon other organisms.

A predator that has few or no predators of its own at the top of the food chain. An over-and-over again movement of matter. A diagram that depicts the energy flow in ecosystems.

Producers are on the bottom while consumers are on the higher levels of the pyramid. First Nations and Metis change. The coyote or a trickster causes change. Different species competing for a limited amount of resources.

Human activities and ecosystems. Human activities can change ecosystems. Ways to deal with garbage. Sanitary landfill, compost, recycled waste, incineration, recycling depot, hazardous household waste operation.

When a crisis hits, social media can be instrumental in broadcasting real-time updates to the public. But what is the right way to go about gathering and sharing that information? In this panel session, you’ll hear from multiple agencies that have experienced crises in their cities.

They will each speak to their best practices for social communications: Running A Better Promotional Process. Given that the best predictor of future behavior is past behavior, the majority of assessment centers fail in their ability to identify the best leaders.

In this class, you’ll learn how to: Run a historically-based promotional process, describe specific components of the process, directly assess for past behavior, explore defensibility, test fairness, and provide examples of exercises and questions that will separate your real leaders from impostors.

This course will survey the ways in which body worn camera footage can be used most effectively by prosecutors as well as members of law enforcement. We’ll cover how to receive, review, redact and discover evidence.

Additiononally, we’ll delve into what to expect from the defense when using this footage as well as strategies to help juries understand and accepat graphic videos. Research has shown that 1 in 4 women in Australia have experienced physical or sexual violence from a partner while in a relationship.

While law enforcement agencies across Australia respond to 5, domestic and family violence per week, most abuse is under reported and under-prosecuted. Come and hear how successful this Accelerated evidence trial was and how QPS was able to increase charges related to arrests and convictions.

Just as body-worn camera technology is advancing, so is the policy regulating it. Join a panel of experts as they discuss the current climate and how to keep pace with the changes.

Ensure your body-worn cameras are being utilized in accordance with company policy prior to deployment. Join us for a discussion on: Who ensure policy compliance? How can technology help?

How does an agency audit recordings? Get the most from your investment in Axon. During this in-depth session, uncover Axon Security’s essential functions and available security features. You’ll be given a tutorial of best practices, mistakes to avoid, and how to actually implement some of these security features for your agency.

Participate in an in-depth conversations to provide your feedback on Axon’s next generation of software products focused on incident reporting, routing and workflows across an agency, and to hear about how we’ve put video at the heart of the record to save officer and reviewer time..

In this session, we’ll get to the bottom of why it’s not simply a convenient business decision by Axon—rather a safety and liability concern. Members of our legal team will be on hand to explain our liability policy and the numbers behind this important recommendation, as well as answer your questions.

Law enforcement officials live by their training. The public often views video as the judge and jury in assigning wrongdoing, ignoring the lead-up or off-camera events prior to recording.

From drafting key messages to prepping your media spokesperson, this deep-dive session will touch upon all the tactics needed for a successful launch. Tell the story you want to tell—and be prepared for every response.

Imagine a nightmare scenario: If there is body-worn camera footage of the incident, should you release it? How do the needs and demands of the public fit in with your public relations and with the media’s increasing demand for camera footage, not to mention the rights of victims and suspects alike?

Axon understands that these questions have come to the forefront of politics and policing and need to be covered. This seminar discusses the politics behind media and body-worn camera footage and provides an overview of the thorny political realities that most agencies will, at one time or another, be forced to face.

In recent years artificial intelligence AI technologies have advanced significantly. From image recognition to language understanding, these technologies are changing our lives and businesses, and law enforcement will be no exception.

At Axon, we are working on integrating AI into all of our product and service offerings, and we are committed in doing so ethically and responsibly. In this talk, we will introduce AI and the initiatives that Axon is taking in this area.

Law enforcement is challenged by the public’s opinions of them both good and bad—making recruiting new talent and keeping the best a huge task. During this session, a panel of Chiefs provides insights on what’s worked for their agencies and how they’ve motivated new talent to stick around.

Most agencies with body-worn camera programs list redaction as one of the greatest challenges they face. That’s why we’ve released the Redaction Studio, one of our latest improvements to Evidence.

In this workshop, you’ll learn about Redaction Studio’s new features and see how it simplifies processing and redacting video in real-time redactions. Capturing evidence doesn’t just happen on body-worn cameras.

Join our experts in a discussion about using in-car cameras for more than capturing video. Learn how AI can be used for a variety of vehicle applications and what are the most valuable applications for law enforcement agencies.

Video evidence can be invaluable—but only if it can be easily logged and found. Participants will gain valuable insight into how evidence can be managed most effectively and how data accuracy can be improved.

Learn about the most impactful security practices that can be employed without expensive software or consultants. Join Superintendent Ian Drummond-Smith from Devon and Cornwall Police as he discusses the key aspects that set their use and policies apart from the rest of the world.

When the Budget People Say ‘No’: Purchasing much-needed equipment for your agency can unleash a host of procurement, policy, and political issues. When you’re hitting hurdle after hurdle, it’s important to have a partner who understands how to create win-win contracts.

In this session, we’ll share some of the programs and strategies that we’ve used to help agencies secure the budget they need for a successful TASER program. Information moves fast—your response has to be faster.

In this day and age, information is instantaneous and media consumers get immediate news coverage from their TVs, computers, and phones. To ensure that your response can be just as immediate as the news coverage itself, it’s crucial that you and your agency have the best possible preparation for media interaction, questions, and interviews already established.

How will you respond during a crisis? They will discuss strategies on how to break down data silos to free up information across an organization and what changes have led to NIBRS becoming the new standard to produce better crime data.

Join us to learn more about Axon’s interview room recording system. During this session, Product Manager Robert Murphy will get you up to speed on Axon Interview, including an overview of the product, what makes up its core features, how it integrates with Evidence.

Cameras catch officers doing incredible things, but what do you do when they do not follow policy? Come and hear from a panel of agencies that use body cameras as a training tool, ensuring their team is prepared, well trained, and accountable.

When deploying a new technology there can be bumps along the way. Join a panel of agencies that have deployed drones and are successfully using them at their agencies to discuss what they would’ve wanted to know before they got started.

They will discuss the future of their programs and the benefits they have seen. If you have limited exposure to Evidence. We’ll provide attendees with an overview of the fundamentals of our digital evidence management system, so you can return to your agency with confidence.

Learn how to solve some of the most frequently asked questions, such as resetting passwords, changing security info, and understanding Evidence. Physical security still matters-even in the digital age.

Learn how physical security is often overlooked and the common failures you walk past every day. More importantly, learn how we can better protect ourselves and our infrastructure.

Participate in an in-depth conversations to provide your feedback on Axon’s next generation of software products focused on incident reporting, routing and workflows across an agency, and to hear about how we’ve put video at the heart of the record to save officer and reviewer time.

Getting officers comfortable with their CEWs starts with them firing training cartridges. As part of our commitment to making it easier for officers to train and practice, we’re rolling out a new training suit and cartridges.

Featuring soft-contact, hook-and-loop technology, the new system makes pin prick injuries impossible and helps ensure OSHA compliance. This session will give attendees an up-close look at the new cartridges and suit, even allowing them to try it for themselves.

One of the most important jobs for members of law enforcement is establishing trust with the public. Historically, law enforcement leadership has been predominantly male.

Thanks to persistence, talent, and perseverance, more and more women rise through the ranks of public safety. First Responders and trauma go hand-in-hand. Therefore, bringing about awareness and understanding the inevitable exposure and potential adverse affects are critical to the individual and agency alike.

This presentation is a first-hand account of an officer’s exposure to both cumulative and acute trauma. Sergeant Christopher Scallon recounts his experiences that will take the audience on his personal journey from an enthusiastic rookie to a damaged cop diagnosed with PTSD and severe depression to a mental health advocate providing a map to resiliency and support for all first responders.

Body worn video, in-car video, interview footage, and other forms of digital data provide valuable evidence in your criminal trials; but what are the legal and foundational requirements for admitting this evidence?

This session will provide you with a working knowledge of the preparation, chain of custody, and foundational predicate questions necessary for successful use of digital evidence in a criminal trial.

Whether your intention is to install body worn video, facial recognition or a new records management system, it’s essential for you and your agency to be prepared for important cultural shifts.

And because every project has the potential to advance your agency’s approach to efficiency and effeciveness in broader ways, it’s important to approach every project stategically. Something in the water?

Nope-just a great campaign. Utilizing using cops, cats and comedy to promote diversity and attract more recruits through a viral video. Learn how the New Zealand Police Department managed to boost recruitment significantly with a viral campaign even in a time when police recruitment is at an all time low.

But what happens after that? How do you ensure your program will be successful and deliver value for money to your department and your community? Acting Inspector Wayne Hutchings managed the largest rollout of body worn cameras in Australia, introducing over body worn cameras to the Queensland Police Service.

The department structured their entire rollout around and evaluation plan underpinned by sound research methodologies. They also conducted several internal audits reviewing the deployment of body worn cameras and Evidence.

Acting Inspector Hutchings will lead us through those processes and how the various evaluation and audit report recommendations are being used to continue to shape their program towards a path to success.

In the heat of the moment, law enforcement officials need to focus on what’s happening around them—not their technology. Our Axon Signal technology helps users capture vital footage without worrying about their cameras.

In this session, we’ll demo our various Axon Signal products and offer attendees insights into how agencies have used the products in the field. Our digital evidence management system Evidence. In this session, we’ll cover the five things we’ve found agencies should do, but aren’t currently doing, on Evidence.

You’ve heard about Evidence. Join Axon’s technical team as they dive into how you can leverage it for user management, reporting, and compliance. By the end of the session, you’ll be prepared to get started.

As part of our efforts in weapons technology innovation, we’d like to share the latest advancements and give you a preview of where this product line is headed in the future. Session attendees will have the opportunity to learn about how TASER devices have evolved over time, hold our Smart Weapons in their hands, and ask questions about specific features or training recommendations.

If you’ve ever wondered how we test our TASER devices to ensure they are field-ready, this session is for you. We’ll show you the function tests we perform in-house, plus share data from top third-party studies that attest to the safety of our CEWs.

We’ll also share a few anecdotes of how our weapons withstood some intense field conditions. The decisions you make before, during, and after a crisis can help determine how well you weather a PR storm.

Learn how to respond to a PR fire without fanning the flames and even turn a negative incident into a positive win for your agency. AI and machine learning are hot topics right now, but what do they mean for you?

Networks like FirstNet will take the value of those capabilities further than ever before. However, the communications equipment required for those network capabilities is required and can be cumbersome and costly to install, oftentimes leaving the fleets in disarray after their useful life.

During this roundtable, Captain Lanava from Bay City Police Department will explore the various purchasing vehicles available for your body camera program, Fleet deployment, or Interview Room solutions.

By the end of the session, you’ll have a better understanding of how each of them works and how to explain the differences to your purchasing agents. Finally, you’ll be able to determine the best fit for your agency.

One of the most logical ways in which body cameras are able to help law enforcement agencies, is by documenting incidents and subsequently using the recordings to arrest, prosecute and convict suspects.

Yet, there is hardly any evidence of the prosecutorial utility of Body Worn Video. Join us to discuss the research that is currently being done. Two-party consent is required in 11 states—meaning audio recording must have mute functionality.

One of the new features of our body-worn cameras is the ability to mute the video. During this seminar, you’ll hear from an expert who will outline the pros and cons of each side of the argument and what your agency should be considering to stay compliant.

Currently, gathering evidence is spread across multiple devices and technology sources. Join us and learn how Broward County is simplifying evidence collection with their smartphones and Axon Capture.

AI is our most powerful technology, and in the coming decades it will change everything. How will we harness and handle AI-powered automation and machines that can outperform us in many aspects of our lives?

While the concept of superintelligent machines may sound like sci-fi, human-level AI could bring about tremendous advancements for society. But, its impact requires us to think about and prepare for this future.

Join technologist Calum Chace as he discusses the prospects and challenges that lie ahead. Transparency, Trust, and Accountability Ireland. Come and learn how she is taking best practices and innovation over seas to impact Ireland.

Drones are just the beginning. The future of security technology is happening in real time. Learn about the coming security challenges facing your agency and how to start preparing now.

Participate in an in-depth conversation to provide your feedback on Axon’s strategies related to bundling and subscription plans. In this session, we’ll take an in-depth look at the types of data that our CEWs can report and how to interpret that data for a clearer picture of deployment events—whether for IA or court purposes.

Large made in soma; small in terminal. What happens to neurotransmitters when they are released, and how are they cleared from a synapse? The neurotransmitter opens that channel, The channel lets ions into the cell, The ions slightly change the charge of the cell If enough positive ions enter the cell, the cell’s charge is sufficiently changed, and there is an action potential.

Can a neuron release more than 1 neurotransmitter? Can you think of an example of this? Know the common neurotransmitters. What is the most common excitatory neurotransmitter? What is the most common inhibitory neurotransmitter?

What neurotransmitters share a pathway of synthesis? What are the initial precursors the first thing in the synthesis pathway for dopamine, norepinepherine, epinepherine, serotonin and acetylcholine?

Some neurons release more than 1 kind of neurotransmitter Sometimes from the same terminal Sometimes from different terminals: Motor neuron in spinal cord release acetylcholine Ach onto muscle fibers, and other branches of the same axon release both Ach and glutamate onto other spinal cord neurons.

For dopamine and serotonin: Know the terms agonist and antagonist. Agonist A drug that mimics or increases the effects of a neurotransmitter Antagonist Drug that blocks the effects of a neurotransmitter.

How are hormones transported around the body? What types of receptors do hormones use? What brain region controls hormone release from the pituitary gland? What is different between the anterior and posterior pituitary, including what hormones are released from each lobe?

What are some other glands in the body that pituitary hormones influence? Understand the principle of negative feedback in hormone release. What is heritability, how do we study it what are twin and adoption studies Estimates of heritability apply to a certain population at a certain time; they are not absolute.

Identification of certain genes linked to behaviors or disorders Ex: If adopted kids resemble biological parents more than adoptive parents, we assume high heritability “Virtual twins” Children of the same age, with no relation to each other, adopted into home at same time 3.

What are examples of environmental influences on traits with otherwise high heritability? Mice in elevated plus maze Ex. What is a sex-linked gene? Understand the heritability of sex-linked genes.

What is a sex-limited gene? What are examples of each sex-linked and sex-limited? Consider a gene on the X chromosome If a male gets this gene, he will display the trait. If a female has it on 1 X chromosome and not the other, she is a carrier.

Present in both sexes but has an effect only mostly in one sex. Genes for chest hair men, breast size women. What is the multiplier effect? Terms to know and understand: DNA, RNA, gene, chromosome, transcription, translation, homozygous, heterozygous, dominant, recessive.

Copy of one strand of the DNA template for protein 4 nucleotides: Person with identical set of genes on the 2 chromosomes is homozygous for that gene Heterozygous: What types of traits move on to the next generation?

What is natural selection? What are adaptive characteristics? Similarities that we see between species suggests a common ancestor. Differences between species allow us to question what pressures may have caused certain animals to develop certain traits.

The process by which inherited traits that confer a selective advantage increase an animal’s likelihood to survive and reproduce become more prevalent in a population. The key mechanism of evolution; how species acquires their adaptive characteristics 4.

How does genetic variability occur? Why does this new field of research “blur the line between environment and genetics”? DNA is wrapped around a histone core. Things acetyl groups, methyl groups, etc can get into the structure and loosen or tighten the wound-up DNA.

This will make a gene more or less likely to be expressed AND these changes are heritable SO you can alter the probability that a gene will be expressed without actually altering the DNA itself.

How is it that genes can affect behavior? Anything that has mass and occupies space. The study of the composition of matter and the changes that matter undergoes. The study of all chemicals containing carbon.

Study of chemicals that in general do not contain carbon. The study of processes that take place in organisms. The area of study that focuses on the composition of matter.

The area that deals with the mechanism, the rate, and the energy transfer that occurs when matter undergoes a change. The pursuit of chemical knowledge for its own sake.

Research that is directed toward a practical goal of application. The means by which a society provides its members with those things needed and desired. Objects that can bew seen only under magnification.

Applies science to the production of biological products of processes, uses techniques that can alter the DNA in living organisms. A material found in air, water, or soil that is harmful to humans or other organisms.

A logical, systematic approach to the solution of a scientific problem. When you use your senses to obtain information you make this. Manipulated Variable Independent Variable. The variable that you change during an experiment.

Responding variable Dependent Variable. The variable that is observed during the experiment. A well tested explanation for a broad set of observations.

Analyze, Calculate, and Evaluate. The world of objects that are large enough to see with the unaided eye. DNA storage in neuron. NREM stage 1 and 2. In the end they all receive the same dose of drug followed by the test so that the degree to which drug disrupts test performance in the two groups can be prepared.

Damaged in Broca’s area causing difficulty with function words such as: Left hemisphere of the brain. Right hemisphere of the brain. The damage was to the medical prefrontal lobe only.

Ah Momma Hit Four Cute Squirrels Over Here amygdala, mammillary body, hippocampus, fornix, cortex of the cingulate gyrus, septum, olfactory bulbs and hypothalamus. Huge brain regions; words stored all over the place.

This sends the brain confusing messages about your body’s position. NTS; nucleus of the tractus solitarius. Movement requires the alternating contraction of opposing sets of muscles called antagonistic muscles.

Red nucleus-midbrain area with output mainly to arms b. Calculates predictable outcomes of actions and plans movement according to those outcomes. Organizes rapid sequence of movements in a specific order; habits.

Integrates information about position and posture of the body; organizes the direction of the movement in space a. Mirror neurons in premotor crtex copying. Globus Pallidus GP – inhibits thalamus.

Patch of tissue in the ectoderm invaginates folds in to become the neural plate 2. This fold pinches off 3. Receiving neuron will either agree by sending out a neurotrophin r remain silent and so it will cause.

Law of specific nerve energies. Receptor cells tells bipolar, bipolar tells ganglion, ganglion tells optic axons of ganglion form optic nerve – which travels to the brain, when optic nerve leaves back eye, that’s blind spot because it contains no receptors.

They control the ability of the ganglion cells to respond to shapes, movements, or other specific aspects of visual stimuli. Less stuff in the way of receptors 2. Color constancy; cortex interferes with color perception and helps you compare info from various parts of the retina to determine brightness and color b.

Combined color theory – all of that. Damage to primary visual cortex. Damage causes visual agnosia. Altering the reflection of sound waves into the middle ear from the outer ear – Helps us to locate the source of a sound.

Makes sense of words. Inferior and medial geniculate tracts. At this time, amniotic fluid will have increased concentrations of alpha-fetoprotein. Dendritic Branching and Environmental Enrichment.

Measurable expansion of neurons has also been shown in humans as a function. Plasticity after Brain Damage. Causes of Brain Damage. A stroke or cerebrovascular accident.

Disruption of the sodium-potassium pump leading to the accumulation of potassium ions inside neurons. The blood is white, and there is slightly darker than normal areas surrounding this, due to local brain swelling.

Excess positive ions in the neuron. Can reduce the effects of ischemic strokes but can make hemorrhagic strokes worse. This results in greater neural representation in adjacent regions of the somatosensory cortex.

Interactions and relationships between biotic and abiotic things. A large area with a certain climate that supports select vegetation. Six basic needs of all living things.

Water, oxygen, energy, interactions with living and non-living things, suitable living conditions, and food. The closest related group of biotic things that can mate and reproduce more of the same kind of living thing.

First Nations and Metis web. Everything is alive and has a spirit. Give back equally to what you take. Substances such as carbohydrates, fats, proteins, vitamins, and minerals that give your body energy and the material needed to move, grow, and repair and maintain the health of a biotic thing.

First Nations and Metis human and wolf relationship. The human and the wolf walk separate but parallel paths. First Nations and Metis entities. Air, earth, fire, and water are alive and interact with one another to form biotic and abiotic things.

Features of a particular region. Ecosystems come in all sizes. Ecosystems need to bring matter and energy into the system and make them continually available to biotic things. A biotic thing that must find and eat or consume other living things for food.

A biotic thing that produces the energy and matter itself that it needs for survival as well as the food and oxygen that all food consumers need for survival.

A consumer that eats primarily meat. A consumer that eats primarily plants and plant-like substances. A consumer that eats other animals and plants. Green plants make their own food to supply the energy and matter that they need for survival.

A pigment in plants that absorbs all colours except for green, which it reflects which is why plants are green. It absorbs light energy from the sun. The process of how plants make their food.

Light energy, carbon dioxide, and water is turned into food sugars and starvhes and oxygen. The process that almost all biotic things use to release the energy stored in their food.

Food sugars and starches and oxygen is turned into carbon dioxide, water, and energy that can be used by all living things. It turns the light energy into chemical energy in plants that biotic things can use for their energy, it provides plants with food that biotic things can use to function properly,, it provides the oxygen need for all biotic things.

Plants and animals that reach newly created land. Carbon-based substances such as plants are changed to become fossil fuels such as coal, oil, and natural gas, which are burned and released into the air as carbon gas.

How water cycles through the ecosystem through evaporation, transpiration, evapotranspiration, condensation, precipitation, and surface runoff, infiltration, and perculation.. How matter cycles through the ecosystem.

Soil, sunlight and water from the non-living environment give plants what they need so that they can grow and live their lives. Herbivores eat the plants, and sometimes other consumers eat the herbivores.

Plants and animals grow, produce wastes, reproduce, and die. Scavengers and decomposers eat the waste and remains, breaking down once-living matter into simpler and smaller particles, eventually even breaking down solid skeletons.

Skeletons have chemicals minerals such as calcium, carbon and phosphorus that other biotic things such as plants need to survive. The minerals are abiotic so they are part of the abiotic environment.

A community that is usually stable made up of a varied number of species. Development that meets the needs of the current generation without hindering the ability of future generations to meet their needs.

The predictable pattern of change in ecosystems. A consumer that breaks down or decomposes dead animals and plants. Decomposers can be helpful or harmful. They are used in the making of cheese, wine, vinegar, mining, and the clean up of oil spills.

They are in composers and turn the compost into fertilizer. The process of a creating a new community. A consumer that gets the matter and energy it needs for survival by preying upon other organisms.

A predator that has few or no predators of its own at the top of the food chain. An over-and-over again movement of matter. A diagram that depicts the energy flow in ecosystems. Producers are on the bottom while consumers are on the higher levels of the pyramid.

First Nations and Metis change. The coyote or a trickster causes change. Different species competing for a limited amount of resources. Human activities and ecosystems. Human activities can change ecosystems.

Ways to deal with garbage. Sanitary landfill, compost, recycled waste, incineration, recycling depot, hazardous household waste operation. Spray bugs, bugs are eaten, bodies decompose, food grown.

DDT got on cockroaches, and geckos eat the cockroaches. The geckos suffer nerve damage and move slowly. Cats switch to eating geckos instead of rats. Cats die from DDT poisoning.

With less cats, the rats reproduce quickly and move from the jungle into the villages, bringing fleas that carry a bacterium that causes plague. Each segment of this contains one pair of sensory nerves and one pair of motor nerves.

Grey and White matter. Comprised of nerves that regulate the automatic behaviors of the body heart rate, blood pressure, respiration, digestion, etc. A network of nerves that facilitates energy conservation and storage — “Rest and Digest”.

Both the long pre-ganglionic neurons and the shorter post-ganglionic neurons release acetylcholine. The other branch of the peripheral nervous system. Consists of sensory neurons that convey information from the sense organs to the brain and motor neurons that convey information from the CNS to the muscles.

For control of voluntary movements. Part of the peripheral nervous system. Receives sensory information from, and controls voluntary and involuntary movements of, the face, head and neck. In the hindbrain it controls sensations from the head, muscle movements in the head, and multiple parasympathetic outputs to organs e.

Located in the Hindbrain Lies anterior and ventral to the medulla. Contains the reticular formation arousal and attention and the raphe system serotonin. Lies dorsal to the medulla. Controls movement, balance, coordination of limbs.

Contains nuclei for cranial nerves and part of the reticular formation. Contains an important group of dopamine neurons. Gives rise to the dopamine-containing pathway that facilitates readiness for movement.

Death of these dopamine neurons is associated with Parkinson’s disease. The most anterior and prominent part of the brain in humans. Consists of the outer cortex cerebral cortex and several subcortical regions.

Several interlinked structures comprise the limbic system. Receives and processes sensory information except olfaction. Sends the output to the cerebral cortex. Contains several distinct nuclei; widespread connections.

Communicates with the pituitary gland to regulate the release of several hormones. Regulates motivated behavior e. Highly conserved across evolution amphibians – mammals. Important for sequences of behavior and certain aspects of memory and emotional expression.

Deteriorates in Parkinson’s and Huntington’s diseases. Provides “cushioning” for the brain. Reservoir of hormones and nutrition for the brain and spinal cord. Direction of CSF flow: CSF drains from the fourth ventricle into the subarachnoid space.

CSF flows through the subarachnoid space and enters the general circulation through arachnoid granulations. Water on the brain. Caused by inflammation and enlargements of the third and lateral ventricles often due to small cerebral aqueduct.

Excess CSF is shunted to abdomen to relieve pressure on the brain. Meninges are membranes that surround the brain and spinal cord. The brain has no pain receptors, but these do.

Swollen blood vessels in the meninges are the cause of these. Swelling associated with meningitis often triggers. Hallmark signs and symptoms. Most common cause is viral infection of the meninges, but bacterial and fungal infections.

Which ear structure vibrates in response to sound passing from the outer ear and down the auditory canal? Within the sensory system, which two different parallel streams of analysis ultimately influence behavior?

With age, some people experience damage to part of the cochlea that results in an inability to perceive high frequencies as well as difficulty distinguishing what people are saying.

Following a stroke, Mrs. Hamilton is unable to recognize her hand as belonging to her body. The neuron fires or does not fire determined on the overall sum. Which class of neurotransmitters is synthesized from a single amino acid and has cell bodies frequently located in the brain stem?

Which of the following is NOT a catecholamine? Mammalian motor neurons conduct action potentials at a speed of meters per second. This synapse mediates presynaptic facilitation and inhibition, which allows for the advantage of selective influence on one particular synapse rather than the entire presynaptic neuron.

A metabotropic receptor binds to its own neurotransmitter molecule and is located on the presynaptic, not postsynaptic, membrane. To terminate a message in the synapse, neurotransmitters are broken apart by the action of proteins that stimulate or inhibit biochemical reactions without being affected by them.

Why do scientists find soluble-gas neurotransmitters difficult to study? Which of the following is NOT one of the three axes of the vertebrate nervous system? Which of the five divisions of the brain is NOT a part of the brain stem?

Neurons are not the only cells found in the nervous system. Kari has had some of this drained away and as a result experiences raging headaches and stabbing pain each time she jerks her head. Material is rapidly transported throughout neurons.

Ramos wants to view a neuron in three dimensions. Komal’s anatomy class is studying major structures of the brain. He is analyzing the tectum, tegmentum, and superior and inferior colliculi.

This part of the brain plays an important role in the regulation of several motivated behaviors, such as eating, sleeping, and sexual behavior. It works in part by regulating hormones secreted by the pituitary gland.

Trisha is studying a mammal that does not have convoluted cortices. A gyrus is a ridge or a hill between fissures and sulci. Which of the following is NOT among the relatively large gyri of the frontal, parietal, and temporal lobes of the brain?

Freezing point is 32 degrees F or 0 degrees C. The 4 nucleotides in DNA. Every electric circuits has 4 parts. What is the electromotive force that pushes electrons through the circuit.

A man named D. Turn pink litmus paper blue. Which of the following is not a property of acids? Conduct electricity in a weak or strong solution. Which of the following is not a property of bases?

They are beginning to develop specialized systems. The biological kingdom Protista can be described by all except which of the following characteristics? Have present and fully functioning systems.

All but which of the following descriptions accurately describes the Fungi biological kingdom? Organisms in the biological plant plantae kingdom contain all except which of the following characteristics?

Are multicellular, eukaryotic, heterotrophic organisms that lack cell walls, Most animals have bodies that are separated into various tissues and contain structures that are unique to each type of organism, Most animals have the capability of being motile at some stage in their life, Animals grow based on hormonal activity and the presence of nutrients.

The Animal kingdom in biological classifications includes which of the following characteristics? Although Aristotle first classified organisms into two groups, plants and animals, subsequent scientists have developed a classification system includes the following levels from largest to smallest: Composed of four chambers, two atria and two ventricles that are controlled by a central pacemaker, Composed of involuntary muscle tissue, Blood pumped out of the heart circulates through two loops, one reaching the lungs and the other all parts of the body, The pacemaker sends signals to the atria and ventricles in order to coordinate their rhythmic pumping activity.

The heart is a muscular organ that can be described by which of the following answer choices? In the last part of the digestive system, the large intestine, used food matter and wastes are further broken down, digested, and excreted.

Which of the following statements does not accurately describe the digestive system? This pressure serves to determine the amount of water kept inside the cell in order to offset the environment outside the cell.

Phosphate groups, Four nitrogenous bases: DNA, the basic chemical of life, is a huge molecule that is comprised of which of the following pick all that apply? Convection currents are the flow that is created due to this heat transfer.

As a fluid is heated, it becomes less dense and rises. The cooler fluid at the surface is denser and sinks causing a current. The study of behavior, looking at the physiological process used to produce this behavior.

Activity of brain and other organs. Historical influence of natural selection. Research what processes have been changed or preserved. Specific Gene for a specific person; Eye color: Blue is one, brown is another.

Similarities and differences to humans, Evolutionary perspective, and ethics and limitations with humans. The jumping of action potentials from node to node. Chemicals that are released into extracellular space by the dendrites of the presynaptic cell after repeated stimulation and, based on activity at a receptor, have an effect on the membrane potential of many cells in that region.

Excitatory postsynaptic potential EPSP. Inhibitory postsynaptic potential IPSP. Goal of Critical Thinking. The presentation of a reason s in support of some claim or action.

Recognize and avoid common pitfalls evaluating credibility of evidence. Recognize and avoid common fallacies evaluating sufficiency of reasons. Cameras catch officers doing incredible things, but what do you do when they do not follow policy?

Come and hear from a panel of agencies that use body cameras as a training tool, ensuring their team is prepared, well trained, and accountable. When deploying a new technology there can be bumps along the way.

Join a panel of agencies that have deployed drones and are successfully using them at their agencies to discuss what they would’ve wanted to know before they got started.

They will discuss the future of their programs and the benefits they have seen. If you have limited exposure to Evidence. We’ll provide attendees with an overview of the fundamentals of our digital evidence management system, so you can return to your agency with confidence.

Learn how to solve some of the most frequently asked questions, such as resetting passwords, changing security info, and understanding Evidence. Physical security still matters-even in the digital age.

Learn how physical security is often overlooked and the common failures you walk past every day. More importantly, learn how we can better protect ourselves and our infrastructure.

Participate in an in-depth conversations to provide your feedback on Axon’s next generation of software products focused on incident reporting, routing and workflows across an agency, and to hear about how we’ve put video at the heart of the record to save officer and reviewer time.

Getting officers comfortable with their CEWs starts with them firing training cartridges. As part of our commitment to making it easier for officers to train and practice, we’re rolling out a new training suit and cartridges.

Featuring soft-contact, hook-and-loop technology, the new system makes pin prick injuries impossible and helps ensure OSHA compliance. This session will give attendees an up-close look at the new cartridges and suit, even allowing them to try it for themselves.

One of the most important jobs for members of law enforcement is establishing trust with the public. Historically, law enforcement leadership has been predominantly male. Thanks to persistence, talent, and perseverance, more and more women rise through the ranks of public safety.

First Responders and trauma go hand-in-hand. Therefore, bringing about awareness and understanding the inevitable exposure and potential adverse affects are critical to the individual and agency alike.

This presentation is a first-hand account of an officer’s exposure to both cumulative and acute trauma. Sergeant Christopher Scallon recounts his experiences that will take the audience on his personal journey from an enthusiastic rookie to a damaged cop diagnosed with PTSD and severe depression to a mental health advocate providing a map to resiliency and support for all first responders.

Body worn video, in-car video, interview footage, and other forms of digital data provide valuable evidence in your criminal trials; but what are the legal and foundational requirements for admitting this evidence?

This session will provide you with a working knowledge of the preparation, chain of custody, and foundational predicate questions necessary for successful use of digital evidence in a criminal trial.

Whether your intention is to install body worn video, facial recognition or a new records management system, it’s essential for you and your agency to be prepared for important cultural shifts.

And because every project has the potential to advance your agency’s approach to efficiency and effeciveness in broader ways, it’s important to approach every project stategically.

Something in the water? Nope-just a great campaign. Utilizing using cops, cats and comedy to promote diversity and attract more recruits through a viral video. Learn how the New Zealand Police Department managed to boost recruitment significantly with a viral campaign even in a time when police recruitment is at an all time low.

But what happens after that? How do you ensure your program will be successful and deliver value for money to your department and your community? Acting Inspector Wayne Hutchings managed the largest rollout of body worn cameras in Australia, introducing over body worn cameras to the Queensland Police Service.

The department structured their entire rollout around and evaluation plan underpinned by sound research methodologies. They also conducted several internal audits reviewing the deployment of body worn cameras and Evidence.

Acting Inspector Hutchings will lead us through those processes and how the various evaluation and audit report recommendations are being used to continue to shape their program towards a path to success.

In the heat of the moment, law enforcement officials need to focus on what’s happening around them—not their technology. Our Axon Signal technology helps users capture vital footage without worrying about their cameras.

In this session, we’ll demo our various Axon Signal products and offer attendees insights into how agencies have used the products in the field. Our digital evidence management system Evidence.

In this session, we’ll cover the five things we’ve found agencies should do, but aren’t currently doing, on Evidence. You’ve heard about Evidence. Join Axon’s technical team as they dive into how you can leverage it for user management, reporting, and compliance.

By the end of the session, you’ll be prepared to get started. As part of our efforts in weapons technology innovation, we’d like to share the latest advancements and give you a preview of where this product line is headed in the future.

Session attendees will have the opportunity to learn about how TASER devices have evolved over time, hold our Smart Weapons in their hands, and ask questions about specific features or training recommendations.

If you’ve ever wondered how we test our TASER devices to ensure they are field-ready, this session is for you. We’ll show you the function tests we perform in-house, plus share data from top third-party studies that attest to the safety of our CEWs.

We’ll also share a few anecdotes of how our weapons withstood some intense field conditions. The decisions you make before, during, and after a crisis can help determine how well you weather a PR storm.

Learn how to respond to a PR fire without fanning the flames and even turn a negative incident into a positive win for your agency. AI and machine learning are hot topics right now, but what do they mean for you?

Networks like FirstNet will take the value of those capabilities further than ever before. However, the communications equipment required for those network capabilities is required and can be cumbersome and costly to install, oftentimes leaving the fleets in disarray after their useful life.

During this roundtable, Captain Lanava from Bay City Police Department will explore the various purchasing vehicles available for your body camera program, Fleet deployment, or Interview Room solutions.

By the end of the session, you’ll have a better understanding of how each of them works and how to explain the differences to your purchasing agents. Finally, you’ll be able to determine the best fit for your agency.

One of the most logical ways in which body cameras are able to help law enforcement agencies, is by documenting incidents and subsequently using the recordings to arrest, prosecute and convict suspects.

Yet, there is hardly any evidence of the prosecutorial utility of Body Worn Video. Join us to discuss the research that is currently being done. Two-party consent is required in 11 states—meaning audio recording must have mute functionality.

One of the new features of our body-worn cameras is the ability to mute the video. During this seminar, you’ll hear from an expert who will outline the pros and cons of each side of the argument and what your agency should be considering to stay compliant.

Currently, gathering evidence is spread across multiple devices and technology sources. Join us and learn how Broward County is simplifying evidence collection with their smartphones and Axon Capture.

AI is our most powerful technology, and in the coming decades it will change everything. How will we harness and handle AI-powered automation and machines that can outperform us in many aspects of our lives?

While the concept of superintelligent machines may sound like sci-fi, human-level AI could bring about tremendous advancements for society. But, its impact requires us to think about and prepare for this future.

Join technologist Calum Chace as he discusses the prospects and challenges that lie ahead. Transparency, Trust, and Accountability Ireland. Come and learn how she is taking best practices and innovation over seas to impact Ireland.

Drones are just the beginning. The future of security technology is happening in real time. Learn about the coming security challenges facing your agency and how to start preparing now.

Participate in an in-depth conversation to provide your feedback on Axon’s strategies related to bundling and subscription plans. In this session, we’ll take an in-depth look at the types of data that our CEWs can report and how to interpret that data for a clearer picture of deployment events—whether for IA or court purposes.

We’ll also show you how you can use Evidence Sync to upload weapon data and manage it using Evidence. Public safety is a shared responsibility between community stakeholders and law enforcement.

In order to solve problems and build lasting solutions, agencies need to establish positive working relationships with community groups, businesses, non-profits, and private citizens.

Axon’s vision is bigger than just cameras or weapons. We’re working every day to build a network that protects life. To make this a reality, we live and breathe six core values that serve as guiding principles.

Join Axon President, Luke Larson, as he discusses the core values of Axon and what that means to you as a customer. Homelessness is a complex issue—one that requires compassion as it does resolve.

The national ‘best practices’ and methods that see true results have to engage the community and have a complete “public-private” partnership. In this session, we’ll provide sessiongoers with the latest on our upcoming product, including a new demo.

Your jurisdiction is about to start a body worn camera program. How will the police and prosecutors work together to make it a success? What steps will you need to take to effectively handle body worn camera videos from the crime scene to the courtroom?

Join Axon in a moderated interview with an agency that is using their drones more than any other agency in the county. They will discuss obstacles they’ve encountered and how they are able to deploy their drones within minutes of receiving receiving a call.

How to Successfully Implement Axon Interview Room Implementing any new technology at your agency can be challenging—and when both hardware and software are involved those challenges are compounded.

Live Streaming Voice of Customer Session The next generation of connected cameras is being built and we want your input. The Implications around Body-Worn Camera Footage Releases When it comes to sharing content with the community, law enforcement agencies have to tread a fine line.

Keeping The Super Heroes Super Public safety professionals are passionate about serving others, yet that commitment can take its toll. Public Evidence Submission in 3 Clicks: An Axon Citizen Demo Collecting and managing digital evidence has become a top concern for agencies especially during high-profile cases or major crises.

Unleashing the Power of Unconditional Respect Policing organizations deliver essentially identical services to communities, but the way that these services are delivered and received can differ drastically from community to community.

Anatomy of an Attack: RMS Voice of Customer Session articipate in an in-depth conversations to provide your feedback on Axon’s next generation of software products focused on incident reporting, routing and workflows across an agency, and to hear about how we’ve put video at the heart of the record to save officer and reviewer time.

Recruiting and Retaining Millennials Millennials make up a significant percentage of police employment positions nationwide. The Power of a Connected Network In our personal lives everything is connected and makes us more efficient.

Interoperability of Digital Systems Agencies across the world tend to view their latest technology systems as standalone systems or processes. Device Management Voice of Customer Session Participate in an in-depth conversation about the pains and needs of Axon device management at your agency with a focus on inventory, configuration, device health, and returns management.

Drone Policy and Certifications Many times implementing new technologies can be held up by the effort it takes to understand relevant regulation and form the right policy.

Utilizing Axon’s Government Affairs Agencies that partner with Axon can rally support with government officials, media, political leaders, business and civic groups for their body-worn camera and CEW programs.

Axon Ecosystem – Trust and Security Trust and security are critical to your team. Investigating Cybercrime Cyber crime is a cat-and-mouse game. A global perspective Join a panel of experts as they discuss de-escalation tactics from around the world.

How to Handle Crisis Communications on Social Media When a crisis hits, social media can be instrumental in broadcasting real-time updates to the public. Utilizing videos on your case, without the Burden This course will survey the ways in which body worn camera footage can be used most effectively by prosecutors as well as members of law enforcement.

Fighting Domestic Violence with Body-Worn Cameras; Queensland Police Service Australia Research has shown that 1 in 4 women in Australia have experienced physical or sexual violence from a partner while in a relationship.

Body-Worn Camera Policy and Legislation Just as body-worn camera technology is advancing, so is the policy regulating it. Deep-Dive Get the most from your investment in Axon. RMS Voice of Customer Session Participate in an in-depth conversations to provide your feedback on Axon’s next generation of software products focused on incident reporting, routing and workflows across an agency, and to hear about how we’ve put video at the heart of the record to save officer and reviewer time..

How to Control the Story The public often views video as the judge and jury in assigning wrongdoing, ignoring the lead-up or off-camera events prior to recording. What is it and what is Axon doing?

Best Practices in Recruitment and Retention Law enforcement is challenged by the public’s opinions of them both good and bad—making recruiting new talent and keeping the best a huge task. Redact as You Watch Most agencies with body-worn camera programs list redaction as one of the greatest challenges they face.

Fleet Voice of Customer Session Capturing evidence doesn’t just happen on body-worn cameras. Dedicated Expo Hall Time. When a Crisis Hits: The Importance of Media Training Information moves fast—your response has to be faster.

How Rules Are Enforced Cameras catch officers doing incredible things, but what do you do when they do not follow policy? Digital Evidence and Case Management Voice of Customer Session The next generation of connected cameras is being built and we want your input.

Drone Best Practices and Lessons Learned When deploying a new technology there can be bumps along the way. Start Here If you have limited exposure to Evidence.

Common Pitfalls in Physical Security Physical security still matters-even in the digital age. RMS Voice of Customer Session Participate in an in-depth conversations to provide your feedback on Axon’s next generation of software products focused on incident reporting, routing and workflows across an agency, and to hear about how we’ve put video at the heart of the record to save officer and reviewer time.

No Pain, Lots to Gain: Your Agency and the Community One of the most important jobs for members of law enforcement is establishing trust with the public. Rising Female Leadership in Law Enforcement Historically, law enforcement leadership has been predominantly male.

Understanding, Awareness, Resiliency, First Responders and trauma go hand-in-hand. Foundations and Admissibility of Body Worn Cameras Body worn video, in-car video, interview footage, and other forms of digital data provide valuable evidence in your criminal trials; but what are the legal and foundational requirements for admitting this evidence?

Hands Off, Cameras On: See our Signal Technology for Yourself In the heat of the moment, law enforcement officials need to focus on what’s happening around them—not their technology.

Drop ‘Em, Soak ‘Em: The Prosecutorial Utility of Body Cameras One of the most logical ways in which body cameras are able to help law enforcement agencies, is by documenting incidents and subsequently using the recordings to arrest, prosecute and convict suspects.

Body-Worn Camera Muting Policy:

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The next generation of connected cameras is being built and we want your input. Drastic reduction in population size brought about by natural catastrophe or overhunting. What does it keep out, let in? Damage causes visual agnosia. Producers are on the bottom while consumers are on the higher levels of the pyramid. The predictable pattern of change in ecosystems. This session will provide you with a working knowledge of the preparation, chain of custody, and foundational predicate questions necessary for successful use of digital evidence in a criminal trial.

The geckos suffer nerve damage and move slowly. Mirror neurons in premotor crtex copying. Do you know of further relevant information? Genes for chest hair men, breast size women.

Have dorsal and ventral horns. Purchasing much-needed equipment for your agency can unleash a host of procurement, policy, and political issues. Mistaking coincidence or random correlation as causation. While the concept of superintelligent machines may sound like sci-fi, human-level AI could bring about tremendous advancements for society.

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Can reduce the effects of ischemic strokes but can make hemorrhagic strokes worse. Measurable expansion of neurons has also been shown in humans as a function. An Axon Citizen Demo Collecting and managing digital evidence has become a top concern for agencies especially during high-profile cases or major crises. See…

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