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What do british post and telephone boxes have in common

What do british post and telephone boxes have in common





Valid till 2017/5/25



A post box (British English; most Royal Mail post boxes have had the time of only the last collection of Post box incorporated into a Type K4 telephone. The Red Post Box: A Royal British Icon July 23, Beefeaters, telephone boxes, the London bus, the This is the most common post box you will encounter. Bookends in plaster of the British Post Box and Telephone Telephone and Post Box Bookends The most common type of telephone box is the K6 or Jubilee kiosk.
Subsequent designs have departed significantly from the old style red boxes. Sableyes Sabbles woz ‘ere. However, fromin Scotland, the Post Office opted to use a representation of the actual Crown of Scotlandin line with a wider policy for government agencies in Scotland. K3, introduced inagain by Giles Gilbert Scott, was similar to K2 but was constructed from concrete and intended for nationwide use. Beefeaters, telephone boxes, the London bus, the Yeomen of the Guard, and post boxes.
A post box (British English; most Royal Mail post boxes have had the time of only the last collection of Post box incorporated into a Type K4 telephone. The Red Post Box: A Royal British Icon July 23, Beefeaters, telephone boxes, the London bus, the This is the most common post box you will encounter. Bookends in plaster of the British Post Box and Telephone Telephone and Post Box Bookends The most common type of telephone box is the K6 or Jubilee kiosk.

what do british post and telephone boxes have in common

what do british post and telephone boxes have in common

what do british post and telephone boxes have in common

what do british post and telephone boxes have in common

what do british post and telephone boxes have in common

what do british post and telephone boxes have in common

what do british post and telephone boxes have in common

what do british post and telephone boxes have in common

Post have do in telephone boxes common what and british balance account hdfc

Sableyes Sabbles woz ‘ere. They became known as “Oakham” boxes — a reference to the similarity in shape with an Oak Ham tin. However, the outbreak of the First World War saw development of a standardised kiosk put on hold. By the s Europeans were arriving at Port Nicholson as it came to be known, after John Nicholson, the Sydney harbourmaster. The principal differences between the two designs were:. This meant that the first public telephone network could be created, at a time when there were only 13, telephones in use, nationwide. It looks like a beetle.

The first standard public telephone kiosk introduced by the United Kingdom Post Office was produced in concrete in and was designated K1 Kiosk No. This design was not of the same family as the familiar red telephone boxes.

As of, there are six K1 boxes in existence, all of which have been listed at Grade II by Historic England, with two still located on British streets. The red telephone box was the result of a competition in to design a kiosk that would be acceptable to the London Metropolitan Boroughs which had hitherto resisted the Post Office’s effort to erect K1 kiosks on their streets.

Because of widespread dissatisfaction with the GPO’s design, the Metropolitan Boroughs Joint Standing Committee organised a competition for a superior one in, but the results were disappointing.

The Birmingham Civic Society then produced a design of its own—in reinforced concrete—but it was informed by the Director of Telephones that the design produced by the Office of the Engineer-in-Chief was preferred; as the Architects’ Journal commented, “no one with any knowledge of design could feel anything but indignation with the pattern that seems to satisfy the official mind”.

The organisers invited entries from three respected architects and, along with the designs from the Post Office and from The Birmingham Civic Society, the Fine Arts Commission judged the competition and selected the design submitted by Sir Giles Gilbert Scott.

The original wooden prototypes of the entries were later put into public service at under-cover sites around London. That of Scott’s design is the only one known to survive and is still where it was originally placed, in the left entrance arch to the Royal Academy.

The Post Office chose to make Scott’s winning design in cast iron Scott had suggested mild steel and to paint it red Scott had suggested silver, with a “greeny-blue” interior and, with other minor changes of detail, it was brought into service as the Kiosk No.

From K2 was deployed in and around London and the K1 continued to be erected elsewhere. K3, introduced in, again by Giles Gilbert Scott, was similar to K2 but was constructed from concrete and intended for nationwide use.

Cheaper than the K2, it was still significantly more costly than the K1 and so that remained the choice for low-revenue sites. The standard colour scheme for both the K1 and the K3 was cream, with red glazing bars.

A rare surviving K3 kiosk can be seen beside the Penguin Beach exhibit at ZSL London Zoo, where it has been protected from the weather by the projecting eaves and recently restored to its original colour scheme.

There is also one other in use at Rhynd in Perthshire. K4 designed by the Post Office Engineering Department in incorporated a post box and machines for buying postage stamps on the exterior.

Only a single batch of 50 K4 kiosks were built. Some contemporary reports said the noise of the stamp-machines in operation disturbed phone-users, and the rolls of stamps in the machines became damp and stuck together in wet weather.

This has been widely repeated including by Stamp [10] but Johannessen [11] chose not to, having found no evidence to support the story. K5 was a metal-faced plywood construction introduced in and designed to be assembled and dismantled and used at exhibitions.

It is not known how many were produced, and there is little evidence they ever reached more than prototype stage. A fully detailed replica constructed using the original drawings can be seen at The Avoncroft Museum Bromsgrove, Worcestershire, as part of the National Telephone Kiosk Collection.

In the K6 kiosk number six was designed to commemorate the silver jubilee of King George V. It was consequently sometimes known as the “Jubilee” kiosk. It went into production in In there had been 19, public telephones in the UK: The design was again by Scott, and was essentially a smaller and more streamlined version of the K2, intended to be produced at a considerably cheaper cost, and to occupy less pavement space.

The principal differences between the two designs were:. The K6 has since become a British icon, but it was not universally loved at the start. The red colour caused particular local difficulties and there were many requests for less visible colours.

The Post Office was forced into allowing a less strident grey with red glazing bars scheme for areas of natural and architectural beauty. Ironically, some of these areas that have preserved their telephone boxes have now painted them red.

With continued demand for K6 kiosks, siting them was more widespread than ever before. A purpose built kiosk trailer was designed from to reduce the running costs of cranes. The K6 was the most prolific kiosk in the UK and its growth, from, can be seen from the BT archives:.

The K1 and the later K3 concrete kiosks were produced at various and largely unrecorded locations, around the country. This made quality control and supervision of the manufacturing process difficult, when compared to the GPO’s experience with cast-iron posting boxes, and was an important aspect of the GPO’s move towards cast-iron telephone kiosks.

Over the years, five foundries were involved in this work for the Post Office. Although many kiosks have been fitted with replacement backs over recent years, unmodified examples generally have the identity of their manufacturer marked on a plate on the outside at the bottom of their back panel.

The only exceptions are the few Mk1 models made by Bratt Colbran, which are anonymous. A supplementary way of identifying the manufacturer is by means of casting marks on the various component parts — i.

A more consistent manufacturer mark can be found at about shoulder height on the inner face of the back panel. These marks generally identify both the manufacturer and the precise model of kiosk.

Up to around, the year of manufacture is also included. The more recently erected non-BT K6 kiosks generally painted black are for the most part new castings, sourced from new manufacturers.

From onwards, the fascias of Post Office kiosks were emblazoned with a prominent crown, representing the British government of which the Post Office was an agency. The design was initially the ” Tudor Crown “, then in widespread use in government service.

The same crown was used in all parts of the United Kingdom and British Empire. On the K2, the design was pierced through the ironwork, and acted as a ventilation hole.

On the K6, a separate ventilation slot was provided, and the crown was embossed in bas-relief. In the new Queen, Elizabeth II, decided to replace the Tudor Crown in all contexts with a representation of the actual crown generally used for British coronations, the St Edward’s Crown.

This new symbol therefore began to appear on the fascias of K6 kiosks. St Edward’s Crown was initially used on kiosks in all parts of the United Kingdom. However, from, in Scotland, the Post Office opted to use a representation of the actual Crown of Scotland, in line with a wider policy for government agencies in Scotland.

To accommodate the two different designs of crown on K6 kiosks, the fascia sections were henceforth cast with a slot in them, into which a plate bearing the appropriate crown was inserted before the roof section was fitted.

The crowns were originally painted the same red as the rest of the box. However, since the early s, when the heritage value of red kiosks began to be widely recognised, British Telecom has picked out the crowns on both K2s and K6s in gold paint.

Kiosks installed in Kingston upon Hull were not fitted with a crown, as those kiosks were installed by the Hull Corporation later Hull City Council, then Kingston Communications. All boxes in Hull were also painted in cream.

In architect Neville Conder was commissioned to design a new box. The K7 design went no further than the prototype stage. K8 was introduced in designed by Bruce Martin. It was used primarily for new sites; around were installed, replacing earlier models only when they needed relocating or had been damaged beyond repair.

The K8 retained a red colour scheme, but it was a different shade of red: The K8 featured a single large glass panel on two sides and the door. While improving visibility and illumination inside the box, these were vulnerable to damage.

With regards to create a new box with easier access, lower maintenance and brighter lighting, the Post Office introduced a prototype run of “Croydon” telephone boxes from, named as such because they were erected in Croydon, Surrey.

However, whilst the trials were successful, the quality of the materials and design made it too expensive for the Post Office to mass-produce and the design was not adopted. In either the late s or late s, a new, smaller hooded booth was introduced known as Booth 7A.

They became known as “Oakham” boxes — a reference to the similarity in shape with an Oak Ham tin. In February, it was announced that all the red telephone boxes would be repainted yellow, which was BT’s new corporate colour.

There was an immediate public outcry; the Daily Mail launched a campaign “against the yellow peril” [19] and questions were asked in Parliament. Mrs Thatcher, who was responsible for the privatisation, would only say that she could “see my honourable Friend’s point”.

After privatisation in, British Telecom introduced the KX, a more utilitarian design, which began to replace most of the existing boxes. The KX was one of a series of designs, including the wheelchair-accessible open-sided KX, and the triangular-footprint KX Few people like to use them.

They are expensive and difficult to clean and maintain and cannot be used by handicapped people”. Many local authorities used legislation designed to protect buildings of architectural or historic importance to keep old telephone boxes in prominent locations and around 2, of them were given listed status.

Several thousand others were left on low-revenue mostly rural sites but many thousands of recovered K2 and K6 boxes were sold off. Some kiosks have been converted to be used as shower cubicles in private homes.

In Kingston upon Thames a number of old K6 boxes have been used to form a work of art resembling a row of fallen dominoes. Subsequent designs have departed significantly from the old style red boxes.

BT followed the KX series with the Multi. Little-used red telephone boxes can be adopted [26] by parish councils in England for other uses. Some examples are shown below.

The kiosk may be used for any legal purpose other than telephony and the contract of sale [27] includes the following clause 5. The buyer shall covenant not to sell, lease or license the Goods to a competitor to the Seller nor to permit a competitor to install electronic communications apparatus as defined in schedule 2 of the Telecommunications Act within the Goods or itself as the Buyer shall not install, provide or operate any form of electronic communications apparatus as defined in schedule 2 of the Telecommunications Act within the Goods.

On a positive note, this air of secrecy adds an excitable and thrilling sense of discovery for people who enjoy post box spotting. Queen Victoria reigned from 20th June to 22nd January, making her the longest reigning monarch in British history so far!

The earliest post boxes date from her reign, and are quite rare. Hexagonal ones are very ornate. These do not bear the name or crown of the monarch. Due to the shortness of his reign, these postboxes are scarce.

George V reigned from 6th May to 20th January The brevity of his reign and swiftness of his abdication means that post boxes bearing his insignia are like gold dust. Our wartime King reigned from 11th December, picking up where his elder brother had left off, until his death on 6th February Due to his long reign, which also included periods in history with rapid building works particularly after World War Two, these postboxes are quite common.

Well, I can safely say that after all your teasing talk of postboxes over the last few weeks, this post did not disappoint. I hope you have fun spotting the exciting one in Cambridge.

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This is a collection of stories and dreams. Some are true and some are not; if it makes any difference. The Lady in Waiting. The Lady in Waiting Tea, cake, and life in Britain.

The Red Post Box: Hexagonal Victorian Post Box. An Anonymous Post Box,

Version 2280 british and post in common boxes have do telephone what free 2208 license

This has been reclaimed from within the UK. Fitted with lock, 2 x keys, cage, collectio George 5th is Circa British made in the Midlands, assembled and finished here by hand at UKAA to our very high standards.

Fitted with lock, 2 x keys, cage, collection box and collection tab. This can be wall mounted or pole mounted. There are four holes in the base for pole mounting. It has been faithfully reproduced to the quality and standard of our former peers.

A working lock is fitte Ideal to use as a Key ring or Keychain. Quality Metal cut Key Rings. The item is heavy and will stand through the roughest weathers, however there is also 2 bolt area at the base were you can secure the box to the ground from theft.

The casting as you will see from the Fitted with the original chubb lock and key, internal cage and chute. Fitted with the original chubb lock and 2 key, internal cage and chute. They are still quite common in London and other parts of the UK!

Royally stylish, incredibly cool! This page was last updated: Number of bids and bid amounts may be slightly out of date. In the first pillar box in the United Kingdom was installed at Botchergate, Carlisle.

In, Richard Redgrave of the Department of Science and Art designed an ornate pillar box for use in London and other large cities. In the design was improved, and this became the first National Standard pillar box.

Green was adopted as the standard colour for the early Victorian post boxes. Between and the hexagonal Penfold post box became the standard design for pillar boxes and it was during this period that red was first adopted as the standard colour.

The first boxes to be painted red were in London in July, although it would be nearly 10 years before all the boxes had been repainted. One has been vandalised briefly with graffiti.

The first public letter boxes post boxes in Russia appeared in in St. Because these boxes were lightweight and easy to steal, they disappeared frequently; later boxes were made of cast iron and could weigh up to 45 kilograms.

The post box arrived in the late 19th century Hong Kong and were made of wood. In the s, metal pillar box appeared in Hong Kong and remained in use until the late s. From the s to the boxes were painted red and after were painted green.

The United States Post Office Department began installing public mail collection boxes in the s outside post offices and on street corners in large Eastern cities. The four-footed, free-standing U.

Mail collection box was first suggested in, following the successful use of such designs in Canada, and quickly became a fixture on U. Unlike Canadian mailboxes, which were painted red, [13] U.

Beginning in, all mail collection boxes were painted a dark green to avoid confusion with emergency and fire equipment. Army donated a large supply of olive drab green paint to the Post Office.

Olive drab green subsequently became the standard color for all U. On 4 July, Postmaster General Arthur Summerfield announced that the Post Office would begin painting all mail collection boxes in red, white, and blue to make them easily identifiable.

Subsequently, the Post Office began painting mail collection boxes in red and blue, with white lettering. USPS “Snorkel” collection boxes for drive-through access.

Post box in Markham, Ontario, Canada. Some postal operators have different types of post boxes for different types of mail, such as, regular post, air mail and express mail, for local addresses defined by a range of postal codes and out-of-town addresses, or for post bearing postage stamps and post bearing a postage meter indicator.

Some countries have different coloured post boxes; in countries such as Australia, Portugal, and Russia, the colour indicates which type of mail a box is to be used for, such as 1st and 2nd class post.

However, in Germany and parts of Sweden, because of postal deregulation, the different colours are for the different postal services. Other nations use a particular colour to indicate common political or historical ties.

Post boxes or mailboxes located outdoors are designed to keep mail secure and protected from weather. Some boxes have a rounded or slanted top or a down turned entry slot to protect mail from rain or snow.

Post boxes are emptied “cleared” at times usually listed on a plate fixed to the box. In urban areas, this might be once or twice a day. Busy boxes might be cleared more frequently to avoid overflowing, and also to spread the work for the sorters.

Extra clearances are made in the period leading up to Christmas, to prevent boxes becoming clogged with mail. Since, most Royal Mail post boxes have had the time of only the last collection of the day shown on the box, with no indication of whether the box is cleared at other times earlier in the day.

Royal Mail say they needed to increase the type size of the wording on the plate to help those with poor sight, and so there was not enough room to list all collection times throughout the day.

Some post boxes may indicate the next collection time by a metal ‘tab’ [23] or dial that can be changed while the box is open. The tab displays a day or number, each number corresponding to a different time shown on the plate.

Some boxes have been used as a dumping ground for used hypodermic needles. In, a number of post boxes were attacked in Scotland in a dispute over the regnal number adopted by Queen Elizabeth II, which was displayed as the E II R cypher on the boxes.

This included at least one which was damaged in Edinburgh with a home made explosive device. The compromise was to put the Scottish crown on Scottish pillar boxes, without any reference to the particular reigning monarch.

One such example can still be seen today in Hong Kong at Statue Square. When the Provisional IRA blew up the Arndale shopping centre in the Manchester bombing one of the few things to survive unscathed was a Victorian pillar box dating from A type A Jubilee pillar.

Nearly 7, USPS collection boxes were removed following the aftermath of the September 11 attacks and the anthrax attacks in which letters containing anthrax spores were placed in public collection boxes.

Since that time, a decrease in first-class mail volume and the onset of online bill payment processing has resulted in lower demand for collection box service in the U. Post box at Dubrovnik Airport, Croatia.

A post box in Funningur, Faroe Islands. Post boxes in Heinola, Finland. Orange 2nd class postbox is very common, blue 1st class mailboxes only at selected places.

German mail box with an old Post horn with arrows stylized lightning bolts from the Deutsche Bundespost, on the top sign the new post horn from Deutsche Post AG. A Guernsey Post type C double aperture pillar box.

Post box of Indian Postal Service. VR pillar box in Kilkenny, Ireland, painted green with obvious door repair.

Telephone Box is painted red with a green dome. The K2 boxes were 9 feet 3 inches 2. They were made of cast iron sections, with the exception of the door, which was teak. The pierced crown in the pediments is for ventilation as much as for decoration and symbolism.

Telephone Box has aesthetic, architectural, historical and social significance. The K2 telephone box was Classical in conception and care was taken over the details. Combining a utilitarian object with elements of traditional architectural design made the K2 a good example of British industrial design.

There are now only about 50 red telephone boxes in functional use throughout the country and over half of these are described as replicas. Telephone Box dates from a time when private ownership of telephones was not high and decades before mobile phones were in use.

Telephone boxes were common sights on streets all over the country and well patronised as the figure of nearly a quarter of a million calls made from the boxes outside the General Post Office in Wellington in the year to 31 March indicates.

With the formation of Telecom New Zealand in the s and its decision to replace the red boxes, there are now only about 50 remaining in functional use and over half of these are described as replicas.

Telephone Box contributes to the streetscape with the other heritage objects at the north end of Post Office Square, with its solid, well-proportioned and practical appearance.

When imported by the Post and Telegraph Department the K2 boxes were considered an aesthetic improvement on the wooden or concrete boxes then in use. Designed by a well-known British architect, Sir Giles Scott, the K2 telephone box was Classical in conception and care was taken over the details.

Simplified variations of Classical architecture were popular between the two world wars and in this regard, the K2 Telephone Box is of its time. Telephone boxes with their public telephones were once widespread and a well-used form of technology that is now in rapid decline with the spread of mobile phones.

The fad of how many people can fit inside a telephone box has been popular at various times. Public telephones were popular when private ownership of telephones was low — as their increase in number from 99 in to in attests.

However, it is an aspect of history that is now on the decline due to the increase in mobile phone usage. This particular box was relocated from Karori to Post Office Square, which is an appropriate location, as well as being a busier area.

The K2 telephone box is considered an excellent example of industrial design — combining practicality, solidity and aesthetic charm. The expense of their production did, however, lead to Scott being asked to design a cheaper version — the K6.

The Post Office Square telephone box has rarity value as a functioning booth — it may be the only one of a K2 design currently still functioning; although this cannot be confirmed.

It is, however, one of a small number of authentic red telephone boxes still being used for their original purpose. Scott was an English architect known mainly as a designer of churches in the neo-Gothic style his main work being the Anglican Cathedral in Liverpool, and for industrial designs such as the Battersea and Bankside power stations in London.

Before the arrival of Maori from Taranaki in the s, the Wellington area was populated primarily by people of Kurahaupo waka descent, including Ngai Tara, Rangitane, Muaupoko, Ngati Apa and Ngati Ira who are generally accepted as the most recent.

By the s Europeans were arriving at Port Nicholson as it came to be known, after John Nicholson, the Sydney harbourmaster. The first immigrants began arriving in January In when Wellington became the capital city, the population was just 4, A building boom accompanied the population increase, with the total number of dwellings in the city doubling in the last 20 years of the nineteenth century.

Economic depression ended the s boom, but by the end of the s there was renewed growth and confidence. Public call box history begins in the s in the United Kingdom.

Most of the early boxes were of the wooden sentry-box type, but there was little uniformity. However nothing was done about this until after World War One. In the K1 Kiosk 1 was designed.

This was essentially an improved version of the sentry box except it was usually of reinforced concrete with metal glazing bars. In, 6, were in use but very few now survive, and aesthetically they were not considered a success.

In a competition was held to design a new one; judged by the Royal Fine Art Commission. The first K2s were produced in, and most were erected in London, which had refused to allow erection of the K1s and for this reason the K2s are sometimes known as the London-style box.

However, some were imported into New Zealand and elsewhere. In comparison, 12 K3s were produced between and The saucer dome rises above four segment-headed pediments, which bears a resemblance to, and is often thought to have derived from, the tomb of Sir John Soane in St Pancras Churchyard.

However, Stamp believes that a dome above segmental curves is a logical solution to designing a sculptural termination to a square pillar when a flat top is not suitable.

Stamp believes the K2 was arguably one of the best examples of British industrial design. Scott produced variations on the design, including the K3. In, he was asked to design an improved version of the K2 — one that retained its best characteristics but was smaller and cheaper to produce.

This was the K6, which went into production in and was not superseded until The K6 can be easily distinguished from the K2 by the treatment of the window panes — instead of regular paned walls the K6 has paned walls, with the middle space much larger than the two sides.

In the mids British Telecom began replacing the old red booths with new booths of American design. There are 4 holes in the bottom for which you can pole mount with our poles.

See our separate advert for this. This has been reclaimed from within the UK. Fitted with lock, 2 x keys, cage, collectio George 5th is Circa British made in the Midlands, assembled and finished here by hand at UKAA to our very high standards.

Fitted with lock, 2 x keys, cage, collection box and collection tab. This can be wall mounted or pole mounted. There are four holes in the base for pole mounting. It has been faithfully reproduced to the quality and standard of our former peers.

A working lock is fitte Ideal to use as a Key ring or Keychain. Quality Metal cut Key Rings. The item is heavy and will stand through the roughest weathers, however there is also 2 bolt area at the base were you can secure the box to the ground from theft.

The casting as you will see from the Fitted with the original chubb lock and key, internal cage and chute. Fitted with the original chubb lock and 2 key, internal cage and chute.

They are still quite common in London and other parts of the UK! Royally stylish, incredibly cool!

And boxes telephone in british post what do common have new social

The standard colour scheme for both the K1 and the K3 was cream, with red glazing bars. Post box at Dubrovnik Airport, Croatia. However, since the early s, when the heritage value of red kiosks began to be widely recognised, British Telecom has picked out the crowns on both K2s and K6s in gold paint. It is unclear why BT wishes to prohibit the kiosk from being re-used for electronic communications and why the regulator, Ofcom, has allowed it. The kiosk was designated Kiosk No 2, or K2. The K8 featured a single large glass panel on two sides and the door. This novelty decoration can be suspended in trees using its natural jute rope.

One side, which contained the telephone, was solid iron; the other three had 18 panes each of glass. Beginning in, all mail collection boxes were painted a dark green to avoid confusion with emergency and fire equipment. It is unclear why BT wishes to prohibit the kiosk from being re-used for electronic communications and why the regulator, Ofcom, has allowed it. K5 was a metal-faced plywood construction introduced in and designed to be assembled and dismantled and used at exhibitions.

Scott, Sir Giles Gilbert Scott was an English architect known mainly as a designer of churches in the neo-Gothic style his main work being the Anglican Cathedral in Liverpool, and for industrial designs such as the Battersea and Bankside power stations in London. Sorry, your blog cannot share posts by email. During a K6 in the village of Westbury-sub-Mendip in Somerset was converted into a library or book exchange replacing the services of the mobile library which no longer visits the village.

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Bit in what boxes telephone british common have do post and matrices 7219 con

Telephone boxes came into use around the s in New Zealand. What do you think? The red telephone box has appeared in British pop culture, such as in Adele ‘s video ” Hello “, the front cover of One Direction ‘s album Take Me Home, the back cover of David Bowie ‘s album The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars, and features in a prominent scene in the black comedy film The Ladykillers where a motley gang of crooks led by Professor Marcus Alec Guinness cram into one. In Britain’s first standard kiosk, the imaginatively named Kiosk No 1 abbreviated to K1 was introduced. See…

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