news

Sony xperia z1 compact review gsmarena

Sony xperia z1 compact review gsmarena





Valid till 2017/5/25



Oct 31, · Video embedded · Sony Xperia Z1 Compact review – Sony’s mighty compact version of the Z1 is the smaller high-spec. We met the Sony Xperia Z1 Compact at CES, but now we’ve lured it into our office and right in front of the camera. This handset promises to revitalize the small. Compare Sony Xperia Z3 Compact VS Sony Xperia Z1 full specifications side by side. See the common features and the differences that make them better or worse.
Sign up for the newsletter Get news, competitions and special offers direct to your inbox. In all other cases you have no choice, but to admire this Japanese creation. The back looks like the front. Search before you post. At x Pros Great screen Solid battery life Premium design and materials Waterproof to 1.
Oct 31, · Video embedded · Sony Xperia Z1 Compact review – Sony’s mighty compact version of the Z1 is the smaller high-spec. We met the Sony Xperia Z1 Compact at CES, but now we’ve lured it into our office and right in front of the camera. This handset promises to revitalize the small. Compare Sony Xperia Z3 Compact VS Sony Xperia Z1 full specifications side by side. See the common features and the differences that make them better or worse.

sony xperia z1 compact review gsmarena

sony xperia z1 compact review gsmarena

sony xperia z1 compact review gsmarena

sony xperia z1 compact review gsmarena

sony xperia z1 compact review gsmarena

sony xperia z1 compact review gsmarena

sony xperia z1 compact review gsmarena

sony xperia z1 compact review gsmarena

Xperia review gsmarena sony z1 compact free download

It’s no accident that it’s a compact rather than a mini – the Snapdragon powered beast would be ashamed to share a name with the upper-midrange at best wannabes of the competition. Sony’s also stuck with its idea of putting the power button on the side of the phone a little above the middle, meaning it’s easy to find and naturally appears where your fingers tend to sit when holding a phone of this size. The tiny bezels on some phones mean you occasionally touch an area of the screen by accident, making the rest of it unresponsive. Yes, Sony has given the Z1 Compact the smaller screen, but it has kicked diminutive RAM and lesser cores to the mobile kerb. In all other cases you have no choice, but to admire this Japanese creation. For Flagship specs Waterproof Decent battery life.

I found that the metal and glass often left the Xperia Z1 Compact cold to touch when left out, but the material combination also leaves it feeling premium. It’s this combination of materials that leaves the Z1 Compact sitting on the scales at g, although I found that I still needed to check my pocket occasionally to see if it was still there.

There is no doubt that the phone feels a little heavy at first, especially when compared to the almost impossibly light Galaxy S5 Mini, but this feeling disappears as quickly as it is noticed.

The smaller frame made using the Xperia Z1 Compact easy to use one handed, and didn’t suffer the same problems of grip that beset the original Xperia Z1. The power key in particular was pretty easy to hit.

The curved edges also meant that I found it was more comfortable in one-handed use than the iPhone 5S, retaining the same business feel but without the sharp edges. However, the feel in the hand is one of a chunkier device – it doesn’t have the same smooth stylings of the HTC One M8 , for instance, and does feel quite hefty compared to other, better-balanced, phones.

Behind all that glass sits the first clue that the Xperia Z1 Compact isn’t quite a fully-fledged flagship; a p 4. Many may scoff at the lower resolution, but Sony has given the screen a lot of attention, certainly more than was provided to the original Z1.

Pure stats show that the Xperia Z1 Compact has enough to compete, as its ppi outstrips that of the four-inch iPhone 5S, and even the newer iPhone 6. The Xperia Z3 Compact’s larger 4. Even so, the level of attention goes deeper than that as Sony looked to address issues that were found when the Xperia Z1 launched.

Gone are poor viewing angles thanks to the inclusion of IPS technology to join the Bravia and Triluminos tech that were found in Sony’s largest handset, the Xperia Z Ultra. However, coming to this from looking at a p screen and you will be able to see the drop in level of sharpness – it’s not massive, but the Z1 Compact doesn’t have the clearest screen on the market.

Making the Xperia Z1 Compact dust and waterproof to IP55 and IP58 standards can’t have been easy with the number of ports that the modern smartphone requires. Thankfully, Sony has managed this well, leaving me impressed with the way they are securely covered.

All bar one of the ports comes with an attached bit of plastic that stands up to some rigorous pulling, with Sony having fully waterproofed the 3. Even the external speaker that runs across the base of the Xperia Z1 Compact has been given the treatment.

I found that this tray was rather flimsy, as well as being difficult enough to require tweezers to remove. Popping in a microSD card was a lot simpler. With all the ports in the left side, Sony has left the right-hand edge to be populated with a couple of buttons.

This serves a few purposes as it allows the Z1 Compact’s It’s a second and a half worth investing each day in return for a fully waterproof phone. Holding the Sony Xperia Z1 is a treat to the senses too, as the Z1 features a full glass exterior as well as a smooth, featureless and button-free front.

The back’s so shiny you could mistake it for a display, albeit a broken display that’s stuck showing the Sony logo in the middle. Sony’s designers have ensured that the Z1’s plastic sides extend by a fraction of a millimetre over the phone’s glassy rear.

This acts as a shock absorber and means the glass should be protected from casual tosses onto hard surfaces – although I’ve scratched the back a little already. But that was probably from chucking it in the sea to check its water resistance, so I have only myself to blame.

It feels big and wide, although thanks to also being rather tall as well it manages to balance pretty nicely in the hand. It’s also cool to the touch, with the aluminium sides giving your hand the odd chill when it’s been out on a table for a while.

Sony’s also stuck with its idea of putting the power button on the side of the phone a little above the middle, meaning it’s easy to find and naturally appears where your fingers tend to sit when holding a phone of this size.

But being so slim and smooth has you worrying. Putting it in a pocket makes you stress that it’s so slick it’s surely only a matter of time before it somehow works itself up and out onto the floor.

But that’s not happened to me yet. I am probably just worrying too much. It encourages you to worry, as it’s such a large lump of a phone you’re always aware of its presence.

Thanks to the positioning of the power button it is just about possible to use the Xperia Z1 in one hand. It’s not entirely comfortable to hold, though, as the angular slab design and glass back has you panicking that it’s a very droppable item.

Your fingers end up seeking out the docking port as the only gripping spot, as that’s the only feature on the left-hand side of the Z1 that isn’t completely smooth and flush.

The back looks like the front. It’s all glass and smooth, although I suspect it’s not made from stuff as tough as that which covers the front, as a fair few tiny scratches have developed in a little over a week of use.

The SIM tray is peculiar, housing an impossibly flimsy piece of plastic that’s used to insert the SIM, which is so thin it’s bordering on paper-like. If you’re a regular SIM-swapper it’ll be a nightmare, as this teeny holder is definitely one of the few weak spots in the Z1’s design.

The left-hand side has the microSD slot and USB connectors, which sit above the docking station pins, while the bottom edge is all speaker grill. It’s not the best place for a speaker as, what with this being such a huge phone, you often end up supporting it with a finger or thumb while using it – blocking or at least changing the level of the audio when simply adjusting your grip.

Gsmarena z1 compact review sony xperia windows vista

It’s also cool to the touch, with the aluminium sides giving your hand the odd chill when it’s been out on a table for a while. Sony’s also stuck with its idea of putting the power button on the side of the phone a little above the middle, meaning it’s easy to find and naturally appears where your fingers tend to sit when holding a phone of this size.

But being so slim and smooth has you worrying. Putting it in a pocket makes you stress that it’s so slick it’s surely only a matter of time before it somehow works itself up and out onto the floor.

But that’s not happened to me yet. I am probably just worrying too much. It encourages you to worry, as it’s such a large lump of a phone you’re always aware of its presence. Thanks to the positioning of the power button it is just about possible to use the Xperia Z1 in one hand.

It’s not entirely comfortable to hold, though, as the angular slab design and glass back has you panicking that it’s a very droppable item. Your fingers end up seeking out the docking port as the only gripping spot, as that’s the only feature on the left-hand side of the Z1 that isn’t completely smooth and flush.

The back looks like the front. It’s all glass and smooth, although I suspect it’s not made from stuff as tough as that which covers the front, as a fair few tiny scratches have developed in a little over a week of use.

The SIM tray is peculiar, housing an impossibly flimsy piece of plastic that’s used to insert the SIM, which is so thin it’s bordering on paper-like. If you’re a regular SIM-swapper it’ll be a nightmare, as this teeny holder is definitely one of the few weak spots in the Z1’s design.

The left-hand side has the microSD slot and USB connectors, which sit above the docking station pins, while the bottom edge is all speaker grill. It’s not the best place for a speaker as, what with this being such a huge phone, you often end up supporting it with a finger or thumb while using it – blocking or at least changing the level of the audio when simply adjusting your grip.

Not a massive flaw, but a minor annoyance all the same. The bottom of the display is allocated for Android’s software buttons, which are presented here in standard Back, Home and the Recent Apps multitasking button.

There’s enough chin beneath the display to ensure these software buttons aren’t too low down the Z1’s body, again helping to make one-handed use a little easier. No mean feat when dealing with a 5-inch monster.

Our Verdict It’s a Range Rover for the school run. For Good battery life Waterproof Some clever Sony additions. Against Loads of Sony bloatware Disappointing indoor photos Erratic screen technology.

Many may scoff at the lower resolution, but Sony has given the screen a lot of attention, certainly more than was provided to the original Z1. Pure stats show that the Xperia Z1 Compact has enough to compete, as its ppi outstrips that of the four-inch iPhone 5S, and even the newer iPhone 6.

The Xperia Z3 Compact’s larger 4. Even so, the level of attention goes deeper than that as Sony looked to address issues that were found when the Xperia Z1 launched. Gone are poor viewing angles thanks to the inclusion of IPS technology to join the Bravia and Triluminos tech that were found in Sony’s largest handset, the Xperia Z Ultra.

However, coming to this from looking at a p screen and you will be able to see the drop in level of sharpness – it’s not massive, but the Z1 Compact doesn’t have the clearest screen on the market.

Making the Xperia Z1 Compact dust and waterproof to IP55 and IP58 standards can’t have been easy with the number of ports that the modern smartphone requires. Thankfully, Sony has managed this well, leaving me impressed with the way they are securely covered.

All bar one of the ports comes with an attached bit of plastic that stands up to some rigorous pulling, with Sony having fully waterproofed the 3. Even the external speaker that runs across the base of the Xperia Z1 Compact has been given the treatment.

I found that this tray was rather flimsy, as well as being difficult enough to require tweezers to remove. Popping in a microSD card was a lot simpler.

With all the ports in the left side, Sony has left the right-hand edge to be populated with a couple of buttons. This serves a few purposes as it allows the Z1 Compact’s It also allows the camera app to function more like a fully fledged camera, with focussing and snapping being really easy.

The top and bottom edges contain only the waterproofed 3. As with every smartphone, the back of the phone contains the camera sensor and LED flash. Elsewhere, only the Sony and NFC branding break up the solid glass rear.

The Xperia Z1 Compact may come a higher price tag than its ‘Mini’ counterparts but also packs a smarter more professional feel backed up with whizzier insides that warrant a second and third look.

Our Verdict Sony shows the world how to make a ‘proper’ mini phone. For Flagship specs Waterproof Decent battery life. Against Poor bundled services Awful low light photography Glass back prone to smudges.

I am probably just worrying too much. It encourages you to worry, as it’s such a large lump of a phone you’re always aware of its presence. Thanks to the positioning of the power button it is just about possible to use the Xperia Z1 in one hand.

It’s not entirely comfortable to hold, though, as the angular slab design and glass back has you panicking that it’s a very droppable item. Your fingers end up seeking out the docking port as the only gripping spot, as that’s the only feature on the left-hand side of the Z1 that isn’t completely smooth and flush.

The back looks like the front. It’s all glass and smooth, although I suspect it’s not made from stuff as tough as that which covers the front, as a fair few tiny scratches have developed in a little over a week of use.

The SIM tray is peculiar, housing an impossibly flimsy piece of plastic that’s used to insert the SIM, which is so thin it’s bordering on paper-like. If you’re a regular SIM-swapper it’ll be a nightmare, as this teeny holder is definitely one of the few weak spots in the Z1’s design.

The left-hand side has the microSD slot and USB connectors, which sit above the docking station pins, while the bottom edge is all speaker grill. It’s not the best place for a speaker as, what with this being such a huge phone, you often end up supporting it with a finger or thumb while using it – blocking or at least changing the level of the audio when simply adjusting your grip.

Not a massive flaw, but a minor annoyance all the same. The bottom of the display is allocated for Android’s software buttons, which are presented here in standard Back, Home and the Recent Apps multitasking button.

There’s enough chin beneath the display to ensure these software buttons aren’t too low down the Z1’s body, again helping to make one-handed use a little easier. No mean feat when dealing with a 5-inch monster.

Sony Xperia Z1 Compact official photos. Email boxes were spammed, comment sections were trolled, petitions were posted but not a single Android smartphone manufacturer dared go against the grain and create a mini that’s actually worthy of its big brother’s name.

If the first thing you look for in a smartphone is screen real estate, you might just not find that sort of credentials exciting. If a huge screen is an absolute must, be it for gaming or video watching, then you are excused if the Sony Xperia Z1 Compact doesn’t get your pulse racing.

In all other cases you have no choice, but to admire this Japanese creation. A smartphone barely bigger than an iPhone 5s, that’s got the latest chipset available in the market, a high-res camera and a screen that, at least on paper, should provide splendid image quality.

Compared to the full-size Xperia Z1, the Compact is only some screen resolution and battery juice short. Sony Xperia Z1 Comapct. However, when you think about it, p would’ve been an overkill on a 4.

This means the Z1 Compact is dustproof and can be dunked in water without dying. By submitting your details, you will also receive emails from Time Inc. UK, publisher of Trusted Reviews and other iconic brands about its goods and services, and those of its carefully selected third parties.

The speaker grille sits on the bottom of the Xperia Z1 Compact, which also has a wrist-strap hole. Another bonus of the design is that there is enough of a flat surface to balance the phone on its side, although not if you also want to be charging it at the same time.

At x Juggling a phone with one hand to try and reach the back browser button, all the while being crushed between sweaty commuters, is an experience we have had once too often with a 5-inch phone.

Trying to fit a big screen into as small a frame as possible comes with its own set of issues. The tiny bezels on some phones mean you occasionally touch an area of the screen by accident, making the rest of it unresponsive.

We would prefer a thinner bezel, but the 4.

Pour telecharger xperia gsmarena sony z1 compact review mobile model and

However, when you think about it, p would’ve been an overkill on a 4. But anyway, let’s see how the Sony Xperia Z1 Compact does in real life, shall we? And with the reduced screen consumption the smaller battery shouldn’t be an issue either – it’s as big as what the Xperia Z offered anyway. Our Verdict Sony shows the world how to make a ‘proper’ mini phone. I am probably just worrying too much.

The waterproof rating and Part of that is because Sony managed to cram a relatively large battery in the device. The Galaxy S4 mini and iPhone 5s both last nearly three hours less.

GSMArena team, 28 January By Evan Kypreos July 3, The waterproof rating and The smaller, p screen also helped a good deal here.

See…

1364 1365 1366 1367 1368

 

Kodi z1 review compact gsmarena sony xperia latest version download

The Sony Xperia Z1 Compact will get you through two days of usage, three if you use it moderately. The Z1 Compact also did double what the iPhone 5s achieves. No mean feat when dealing with a 5-inch monster. See…

(c) 2017 http://sawron. com. Theme: / and Http://sawron. com/.

Related posts

Leave a Comment