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Samsung galaxy s6 edge 32gb vs samsung galaxy s6 32gb

Samsung galaxy s6 edge 32gb vs samsung galaxy s6 32gb





Valid till 2017/5/25



Apr 18, · I’m planning to get an S6 through my work and for $ I can either get the S6 64GB or the S6 Edge 32GB. What do you think is the better choice? Is. Samsung Galaxy A5 vs Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge 32GB comparison on basis of price, specifications, features, performance, display & camera, storage & battery, reviews & ratings and much more with full phone specifications at Gadgets Now. Product comparison of Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge vs Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge 64GB on Pricebaba. A complete comparison with photos, price, .
The news will be more tragic for some than others but not having to handle the S5 with kid gloves was a treat. All the photos you’ll see in the gallery above were shot with everything set to auto and with HDR off, and I’ve dumped them into Samsung Flickr album in case you want to take a closer look. Really, though, these navigational benefits feel Galaxy an afterthought, like Edge little accidents that came about thanks to Samsung’s screen-shape decision. There’s no way it’ll ever Samsung a candle to the One M9 and its pair of BoomSound speakers, but the S6 duo’s driver brings enough oomph to the table that you can stick the phone into your car’s cupholder, crank up the Galaxy and still hear plenty over the din of the road. This is a review based on my experience of using Galaxy S6 edge along with iPhone5s and its previous model Galaxy S5. Swiping in from the upper left 32gb right part of the screen you’ll indicate during setup if you’re a righty or lefty causes an array 32gb colored bubbles to drift into view.
Apr 18, · I’m planning to get an S6 through my work and for $ I can either get the S6 64GB or the S6 Edge 32GB. What do you think is the better choice? Is. Samsung Galaxy A5 vs Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge 32GB comparison on basis of price, specifications, features, performance, display & camera, storage & battery, reviews & ratings and much more with full phone specifications at Gadgets Now. Product comparison of Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge vs Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge 64GB on Pricebaba. A complete comparison with photos, price, .

samsung galaxy s6 edge 32gb vs samsung galaxy s6 32gb

samsung galaxy s6 edge 32gb vs samsung galaxy s6 32gb

samsung galaxy s6 edge 32gb vs samsung galaxy s6 32gb

samsung galaxy s6 edge 32gb vs samsung galaxy s6 32gb

samsung galaxy s6 edge 32gb vs samsung galaxy s6 32gb

samsung galaxy s6 edge 32gb vs samsung galaxy s6 32gb

samsung galaxy s6 edge 32gb vs samsung galaxy s6 32gb

samsung galaxy s6 edge 32gb vs samsung galaxy s6 32gb

Galaxy samsung 32gb 32gb galaxy s6 vs samsung edge s6 gravity doob

Thing is, you can often coax that sort of bokeh from the lens and camera without software trickery at all so long as you stick the phone close to your subject. HDR mode can help tremendously here when photons are scarce, but it’s best used when you’re photographing dim landscapes or subjects that can sit still. I use it conveniently. I have no problem in using this. Global model doesn’t have this problem, so I am guessing it will be improved with update. Android is far more convenient in terms of IME.

The app launcher itself is a little less attractive, at least at first. By default, Samsung has arranged all of its apps including Microsoft pack-ins like OneNote and OneDrive and everything else you install gets tacked on the end of the list in the order you downloaded it.

Thankfully, there’s an “A-Z” button in the corner to whip things into more manageable shape. Oh, and you can resize the app grid on your home screen to accommodate up to 20 shortcuts, not including widgets.

This is where you might expect the Edge to shine. After all, the test balloon that was the Note Edge used that extra space extensively, right? I’d argue the big Edge tried to shoehorn as many little gimmicks as it could into that little side-screen does anyone really need a ruler on their phones?

Swiping in from the upper left or right part of the screen you’ll indicate during setup if you’re a righty or lefty causes an array of colored bubbles to drift into view.

You can assign up to five people their own specific color, so that when they contact you, the edge of the phone will spring to life with their assigned hue. It’s a neat trick, for sure, but its value is limited.

To start, why the limit on five people and colors? And if the edge that lights up happens to be pointing away from you, you might as well just flip the phone over and see who it is instead of turning it around to see what color is throbbing.

Meanwhile, rubbing the edge of the screen while it’s off causes Samsung’s so-called Information Stream to pop up, giving you access to the time, notifications and news updates without lighting up the whole panel.

Truly, it’s so much more convenient to tap the Home button to see all that than to stroke the edge of a screen; in fact, it’s so much easier that to even bother just seems silly.

It’d be another story if the news headline that showed up was somehow tied to your preferences as set in Flipboard Briefing, but nope — it’s just some random nothing from Yahoo News. Oh, and you can turn on a clock that’ll live on the edge until the battery level drops below 15 percent.

That’s the only truly useful feature in the mix The thing is, I appreciate that Samsung didn’t try to bog the Edge down with nonsense, but in doing so, it proved it still doesn’t know what to do with that extra space.

That’d be a greater sin if the screen didn’t look so damned cool, but none of this helps sell the Edge to anyone who’s on the fence. The cameras in Samsung’s high-end phones have always been at least above average, but that’s not good enough anymore.

Nailing the camera was just crucial this time around and, long story short, Samsung did a great job. But first, the broad strokes. The S6 and the Edge share the same megapixel rear camera made by Sony, no less, which doesn’t sound incredibly impressive compared to some of the other sensors used in other phones.

Performance in low light is mostly great too, though you’ll occasionally have to tap to focus a few times to make sure you’re actually homing in on what you wanted. HDR mode can help tremendously here when photons are scarce, but it’s best used when you’re photographing dim landscapes or subjects that can sit still.

The fact that we’ve got a beautiful Quad-HD AMOLED screen to view them on is a huge plus too though your screen color settings might mean the actual photo looks different on your phone than on a computer or television.

Meanwhile, the wide-angle lens on the 5-megapixel front-facing camera makes for some seriously spacious selfies — it captures way more of your surroundings than you might expect, so bring the phone in close for the best results.

Just be sure to dial down Beauty Mode to keep your face from looking like you got plastered with foundation. That’s not to say the camera experience is perfect; the auto-exposure can be a little finicky sometimes, leading to some overly warm shots when things get dim.

For the sake of speed, you can fire up the camera by swiping up on the home screen or by double-tapping the Home button at any time. Samsung says it only takes 0.

By default, the Samsung camera app is straightforward; the shutter button and mode selector live on one end, and a quick tap reveals controls for your flash, timer and HDR on the other. If you’re anything like me, you’ll be working with this default configuration most of the time and the results won’t leave you complaining.

You can, however, jump into a Pro mode where you can fiddle with your exposure, ISO and metering settings, and it’s easy enough to save those changes as a preset to be fired up later.

Pro mode aside, you’ve got your usual slew of kooky features to play with, but the new ones are worth pointing out. Kicking the camera into background defocus mode is a nifty little attraction that lets you selectively blur parts of your shots, sort of like a Lytro, but all in software.

Thing is, you can often coax that sort of bokeh from the lens and camera without software trickery at all so long as you stick the phone close to your subject. There’s a Virtual shot mode that captures a 3D video of an object if you can move around it smoothly enough too, and it’s cool enough until you realize you can’t share it and still maintain the flashy effect.

The ability to record 4K video is back as well, and with the same five-minute limitation Samsung aficionados will already be familiar with. Most of the video I shot between the two devices was on par with the still photos I took, and a new object-tracking autofocus a feature I’m used to seeing more in DSLRs usually works like a charm too.

At the end of the day, I’d still give the photographic edge to the iPhones, but it’s an awfully tight race and Android fans can buy an S6 or S6 Edge without fear of working at a disadvantage.

With each passing year we demand more and more from our tiny pocket-computers, especially when they’re hyped up the way flagships are. The hype was especially boisterous this year: A crush of reports maintained that Samsung was originally on the Snapdragon train, before it ditched the in favor of silicon of its own making.

When it comes to regular, day-to-day performance, the differences are slight. That’s to be expected, really; we’re inching toward an age so profuse with processing power, so rife with RAM that flicking through home screens and firing up apps on flagship phones is nearly seamless.

Both the S6 and the Edge were incredibly snappy, with virtually zero lag during normal use. I could usually coax the phones to take a little longer than normal to figure out what to do next, but the keyword there is “coax” — we’re talking opening apps and leaping between them faster than anyone would ever need to just to be an ass.

Whenever I used the phone as I normally would, both devices were basically butter. Speaking of butter, it wouldn’t surprise me if devices running the Snapdragon occasionally ran warm enough to melt some.

That was supposedly the reason Samsung ditched the chipset altogether, and if true, the folks in Korea made the right call. Graphics – and processor-intensive tasks usually push smartphones to their limits, so I spent about 45 minutes sifting through the auto-firing tedium that is Dead Trigger 2.

The S6 and Edge scarcely warmed up at all. Ditto for the hours I spent drifting around Asphalt 8 with the visual quality cranked all the way up. The phones got a touch warmer while I was running some benchmark tests, but the heat buildup was nowhere near as noticeable as it was on the M9.

That the S6 and Edge would be super-snappy was sort of a given, but the bigger question is how long they’ll last before they need a trip to the power outlet.

Before we tackle that, it’s worth noting that the two S6s aren’t identical in this regard: The basic S6 has a 2,mAh battery while the Edge has a slightly bigger 2,mAh one.

Oh, and don’t forget that both batteries are sealed too; the age of swapping spare cells into your new Galaxy S is finally over, I’m afraid. Samsung says its new line of 14nm Exynos processors are designed to deliver more horsepower at greater efficiency, which leads to both versions of the phone sticking around for between 11 and 12 hours of continuous workday use which in my case consists of horsing around on social networks, firing off emails in CloudMagic, taking a smattering of calls and the occasional prolonged bathroom break playing games.

That’s not shabby, but it does lag slightly behind the 13 hours I regularly squeezed out of the One M9 and my old Galaxy S5. Neither device really dazzled in our standard Engadget rundown test, either.

With a p video set to loop with the cellular and WiFi radios on and the screen brightness set to 50 percent, the S6 only lasted eight hours and 49 minutes. Meanwhile, the Edge and its very slightly bigger battery hung in there for nine hours and two minutes before finally giving up the ghost.

In case you’re wondering, both died about an hour before last year’s Galaxy S5 did, although they beat out the HTC One M9 by about 40 minutes. Thankfully, all of this is offset a bit by the fact that both devices recharge quickly; think: This is shaping up to be an awesome time to buy a smartphone, as some of the biggest players have already revealed their flagships for the year.

It made its US debut at nearly the same time as the S6 and the S6 Edge, and with it comes a very familiar set of design genes, Qualcomm’s shiny new Snapdragon chipset and a mostly great set of speakers.

If anything, its tragic flaw is the megapixel camera sitting high on its back. During my weeks of testing, I couldn’t reliably get photos that were better than what last year’s M8 was capable of.

Honestly, the average consumer probably won’t be able to tell, but the issue is made doubly troubling by the fact that the S6 duo’s cameras are among the best I’ve ever seen in a smartphone. While the left and right of the S6 Edge’s screen curve away from you, the Flex2’s top and bottom curve toward you — the idea is your media will suck you in when you turn the thing on its side.

Not as much as I’d like. Alas, LG’s usually light touches with its Android overlays were just weighty enough to slow down day-to-day usage. And pardon me for getting a little meta, but the S6 Edge’s biggest competitor is none other than the regular S6.

Unless you absolutely love and I mean love the curved look, you can safely buy an S6 and know that you’re not missing out on anything of crucial importance. Then, of course, there’s the iPhone.

Say what you will about Samsung taking design cues from Cupertino — if you’re not sure whether to go iOS or Android, your decision just got a lot tougher. Apple’s ecosystem usually gets buzzy new apps before Android does, and I’d say the cameras on the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus more the latter, really are just a hair better.

Still, the combination of some top-notch hardware and a version of TouchWiz that’s mostly a pleasure to use means I’m considering dropping my iPhone 6 in favor of an S6 Edge as my full-time daily driver.

Now, if only my friends would all use something other than iMessage. I’ve never been a huge fan of Samsung phones. For years, the software felt too kludgy, the designs chintzy and scattershot. Not so this time.

Samsung has in the S6 a flagship that feels well thought-out and complete in a way I wasn’t sure the company was capable of anymore. Calling it “perfect” would be irresponsible and inaccurate, but the S6 is the closest Samsung has come in a long time.

Then there’s the Edge. If it hasn’t become abundantly clear already, let me belabor the point one last time: There is no functional benefit to owning this thing. It does everything the regular S6 does, and what few edge-friendly tricks it packs aren’t even all that useful.

The only real reason to buy it is because you like the way it looks — and I do. I really, really do. Together, they’re the brightest stars in Samsung’s galaxy, and the S6 in particular will rightfully wind up in a lot of people’s pockets.

If you’ve got cash to burn, though, or if you’re a real sucker for the new and beautiful, the S6 Edge might just be what you’ve been searching for. Apple’s red iPhone 8 and 8 Plus go on sale tomorrow.

Galaxy S6 and S6 Edge review 73 Photos Pros Sturdy, stylish design Impeccable camera experience Great day-to-day performance TouchWiz is finallyworth using. Cons Battery life could be better Fingerprint sensor can be flaky It’s not waterproof No microSD or removable battery.

Summary Samsung has a lot riding on its flagship, and this time it’s put its best foot forward. Pros Stunning design The curved screen is gorgeous Impeccable camera experience Great day-to-day performance.

Cons The curved screen doesn’t do much Battery life could be better No microSD or removable battery It’s not waterproof. Summary This more expensive version of the Galaxy S6 banks it all on looks.

Hardware Before we go any further, know this: Display and sound If you wanted to skip this section outright, just know this before you go: Software Like every other phone maker worth its salt, Samsung has spent the past year or two slowly cranking down on the sheer amount of stuff it slops on top of stock Android.

Samsung’s newer, lighter TouchWiz 49 Photos Now, I was plenty and surprisingly fond of TouchWiz’s style the moment I fired up these phones, but you can choose from about 12 different themes if you’re itching for something else.

I have no problem in using this. I only was stressed when I used Galaxy before, but now it has been evolved and is an excellent model. I can see why now it is a rival of Xperia.

I felt it was developed in a good way. I thought about getting the newest S7 edge, but I didn’t like its colors, so I decided on this. Fashionable colors like gold and green cannot be seen with other models.

S7 edge seems more convenient with its water resistance and compatibility with micro SD card, but I chose S6 edge for its color. I am not too much fussed about water resistance, but I find it hard that I cannot use micro SD.

But it may be thin for not having it. It cannot be helped. I tried Gear VR, too. Pictures pop up with 3D. There are several Netflix videos I can see with big screen, and it makes me feel like watching it on 80inch screen.

You cannot experience this without Galaxy! It is not comparable with average smartphone goggles. I have both global and domestic model. I am evaluating the domestic model here.

Global model had bad battery life at first, but it got better with update. The battery of domestic model lasted for a day and a half even before update. I think how it receives reception may be affecting.

As for pushbutton usability, I had known the power button was difficult to use as it was located on its top, but the volume button on the back is also difficult to use as I fold the flap cover back. I thought its response is perfect, but when double tap to start it from sleep, it sometimes fails to respond or takes too long.

Voice call sound quality is sharp and easy to hear. I don’t get tired as this is only my substitute machine, and don’t use it for calls for a long time. I am using customized ringtone, and it is easy to hear.

Music does have touch noise for start and stop, but it is not annoying. Global model doesn’t have this problem, so I am guessing it will be improved with update. It can be the problem of this particular phone.

It seems there are examples of some apps not working because they are made with intel, but I have no problem in my environment. Including preinstalled apps, with Google play, it is, so I think I have installed many apps.

Having said that, they don’t kindly help you with problems caused for it being cheap. This is more for those who don’t want customer service but instead their device to be cheap. You are responsible for its trouble or changing it.

I am happy with its internal speaker, too. I am happy that it charges up very quickly. I hope this helps those who are thinking buying this device. It doesn’t have area difficult to see, and it doesn’t misoperate either.

It is about the same weight as it is without a case, so I can easily put it in my chest pocket of my shirt. I use games, movies and the Internet more than average people do.

I don’t feel stressed with its speed of reading and displaying as it is fast. This was the only device it was not affected when starting a game with LINE, Twitter and browser opened in the background.

Especially when I watch movies or play games. As for outside, I do need to brighten to make it easier to see. I only used my power bank once when I went to an event where I was outside all day, so you don’t need to worry about it if your usage is only average.

Some people seem to say its battery life is not good though they don’t use much, but I assume they are leaving apps working in the background. I close them regularly. I think this one, which doesn’t have water poof function like iPhone, releases its heat very quickly.

It is expensive, but when you use it with its official case, this looks as good as Xperia or iPhone. Its high CPU makes this phone not for everyone, but this would be the best device for those who would like to try many new things.

I bought this on the next day it came on the market. This is a review after having used it since then. This is narrower than that vertically, so it fits in my small hand and is easy to use.

I don’t mind its thickness. I find it easier to operate. I find it difficult to press. I replaced my phone thinking the battery life would get improved I thought I had read that the battery life was good before its debut, but it has been as bad as my previous phone which I had bought over two years ago since the very first day I bought it.

I even thought memory cleaner app is broken. In the end, I decided on this. I would like to write a review comparing them. I thought it was close to iPhone6.

Note Edge was so big that it made me tired just by holding it, and Aquos Serie was too thick. It now is getting difficult to find an Android phone with a physical home button.

It is good that it has fingerprint authentication like iPhone6. You don’t have to swipe it like you do with Note Edge or phones from Fujitsu but you only have to press it; it improves the recognition.

The merit of having a physical button with fingerprint authentication is that you don’t have to use the power button on the side which is difficult to use, and you can restart from sleep easily and surely while you get your fingerprint recognized.

With Xperia, you can press sleep screen twice, and with Aquos, it has grip magic; all makes are thinking of better ways, but they still don’t work perfect and are stressful.

Considering how quick fingerprint authentication is, the choice would be either iPhone or Galaxy. Also, back button and history button are located on the sides, so it doesn’t have key on the display, which means I can use the screen fully.

Samsung must have thought it over. But the visibility of the Edge is bad with light’s reflection. Even with Aquos, which has good reputation for long battery life, it uses a lot of power when GPS is on, so I think it is up to your setting.

I don’t feel it is worse than iPhone6. But Aquos is too good, so I give this 4 stars. So data, which you cannot show to other people, should be secured in the phone itself.

The capacity is 64GB, too. If you are not happy with pushy iOS and would like to change to Android phones, this would be the best choice. Rather than devising not to be called it is a copy of iPhone, looking this similar is easier to understand and easier to choose.

Possibly because of this device, when I watch YouTube videos or listen to music, the volume sometimes goes up and down. It is not stable. The edge display on its sides, which are one of the characteristics of this phone, works when I just try to pick it up while watching movies or browsing leaving it on a desk.

There are not many protection films which cover the Edge. Also, there are less covers compatible with this compared to S6. To those who play Minecraft PE. Because of the Edge display, control buttons become so small.

Even when you make them the biggest they can be by changing the setting, they only become as big as your thumb. It is a little difficult to play compared to other devices. This is big for women, so I assume there are some people who are thinking about using a banker ring.

Actually I am one of them. But when you put it on glassy bit of the back, it comes off easily. If you want to put it on, you might have to stick it over a cover. The edge helps making images or movies three-dimensional, but that’s about it.

Other functions are inconvenient and not usable. It is slippery, but it has no problems as I put a protection cover on its back. I put it in an inside pocket of my jacket, but I have no problem with it.

My previous phone was of other make, but I got used to it right away. I watch movies when I commute by train, and I had no problem watching against the light. It is bright, too. Of course it uses a lot when you use it with full power.

I am using a contactless charger, and I find it convenient. It charges up even when I place it carelessly. I can connect it with PC using wi-fi easily.

I use it conveniently. It looks good, but it is difficult to use. But I am not happy with it now I actually have used it; it is jumpy and difficult to hold. I cannot deny that it is copying the design of iPhone or Xperia, but it is better for users when it’s cooler, so I find it good.

The camera on its back is still uncool, though. I assume many people don’t like it, but I personally like it. But it had no problem for daily use. Even considering the fact that Xperia Z3C was too good, this is terrible.

They should have made it thicker, say 7. But the battery is terrible. This is really a waste. They shouldn’t have worried about thinness, but attached importance to practicality. It is so fashionable that I wonder if it is OK for a man to have it.

The design of the Edge is perfect, too. It is very easy to operate. Fingerprint authentication is very fast, too. My previous phone annoyed me to bits, so I am very satisfied with this.

My frustration is gone. Nothing to complain about. The previous phone was beautiful, too, but it still is beautiful. It is easy to see in the daylight, too! As for music, it sounds good when you use an earphone.

I was to buy XperiaZ4, but I couldn’t wait for it to be released, and XperiaZ4 didn’t have purple in its color choice, I chose this thinking there shouldn’t be difference in their performance.

This is my first Galaxy, and I am very happy with it. I met a good device after a long time. This is a review based on my experience of using Galaxy S6 edge along with iPhone5s and its previous model Galaxy S5.

I think both men and women can use it without looking too much. It is not too flashy like iPhone5S, so it suits for both formal and casual occasions. The screen has fluorine coating, so even though I am using it without a film, scratches and fingerprints don’t stand out.

It doesn’t have non-slip surface on its back like S5 did, so you need to be careful not to drop it. Double pressing the button starts the camera, and its response is great. It makes taking photos fun.

This is an advantage other Android devices don’t have. The response of iPhone’s keyboard itself is excellent, but it doesn’t have Google Japanese input yet. Also, possibly because of Apple’s strict restriction or lack of memory, it is still rough.

Android is far more convenient in terms of IME. Old Android phones didn’t work smoothly compared to iPhone, but it doesn’t apply to current Android phones. I don’t know if it is thanks to octa-core and Lollipop, but now it feels it does better than iPhone for its response.

Changing apps, text input, the speed of scrolling when browsing using Chrome, Twitter and Google plus have been improved a lot compared to S5. It is very convenient as I can mute it depending on days or time like with iPhone’s sleep mode.

Also, it has light on notification panel, which I find convenient, too. I even get smitten with its beautifulness compared to iPhone5S’s Retina display. The visibility outside is improved compared to S5.

I don’t feel it has a particularly long life. I feel I need to charge it to use it after work. It even had a movie of ice bucket challenge, and it gave me sense of security that it is OK to use it roughly.

It is a pity that it doesn’t have that function. Also, it is disappointing for heavy users that it doesn’t take SD cards and the battery is not changeable. I think dust and water proof and SD cards are Android’s signature.

They didn’t need to copy iPhone here. The camera is excellent. This probably is the best smartphone at the moment, which has been proved with the amazing number it showed with foreign Dxo bench mark.

It takes very beautiful photos when it had enough lighting without shakes. It is very sharp, and it is better than iPhone5S. S5 sometimes takes better photos outside, but for night view and inside, S6 does much better.

Cameras of smartphones are to take photos at sudden good photo opportunities or take photos casually, so the function of starting the camera by double pressing the home button is an amazing function.

Having said that, as for AF, I feel S5 did better. Also, it had touch panel shutter function which allows its users to take photos just by touching the part they want focused, but S6 doesn’t have that function as default.

I am sorry if it’s just me not being able to find that function. I didn’t see much improvement in iPhone6. Most smartphones at the moment don’t have much room for technological improvement, but Galaxy series gives me impression of innovative change like with Galaxy Note Edge and Galaxy Note.

Having said that, I don’t know if it’s worth paying 90,yen. It would have been perfect if it had a removable battery, dust and water proof functions and SD cards. Even when it is a monster smartphone with high spec, if I have to worry about battery life and watch less movies and dim the screen light, it is misplacing the priorities.

Also, because it uses glass all over, I hesitate to use it without a case especially with this price. In terms of this, S5 which allows me to use it roughly with its water proof function and changeable covers with removable batteries, suits me better.

Battery life or toughness is more important than response or image quality of cameras. S6 made me realize how good S5 was, and I am thinking making S5 my main machine again from S6 edge.

LOL This is not as flashy as it looks at shops. I like how the Edge feels against my hand. The machined metal part gets caught in my palm, so it is less slippery. My previous phone was Xperia Z2, and it was slippery.

So I find this being non-slip is very helpful. The fact that Z2 being heavy helps me feel so, too. I think this probably is by far the lightest among the current models in this size.

Its thinness is good, too. I’m happy that it doesn’t get bulky in my chest pocket. The best thing about it is that I can start the camera just by pressing the home button twice.

It took forever for Xperia to start camera, so I feel a world away from when I was using it. By using an app, I customized to start an app by pressing the home button once. I secure this with a handlebar mount on my bike to use it as a bicycle computer.

I cannot use finger print authentication over the case, which I find inconvenient. I assume it cannot be helped, though. Home button is convenient, but I also find it good that I can turn the display on by gestures.

01net vs galaxy samsung galaxy 32gb 32gb s6 s6 samsung edge adobe flash

Performance in low light is mostly great too, though you’ll occasionally have to tap to focus a few times to make sure you’re actually homing in on what you wanted.

HDR mode can help tremendously here when photons are scarce, but it’s best used when you’re photographing dim landscapes or subjects that can sit still. The fact that we’ve got a beautiful Quad-HD AMOLED screen to view them on is a huge plus too though your screen color settings might mean the actual photo looks different on your phone than on a computer or television.

Meanwhile, the wide-angle lens on the 5-megapixel front-facing camera makes for some seriously spacious selfies — it captures way more of your surroundings than you might expect, so bring the phone in close for the best results.

Just be sure to dial down Beauty Mode to keep your face from looking like you got plastered with foundation. That’s not to say the camera experience is perfect; the auto-exposure can be a little finicky sometimes, leading to some overly warm shots when things get dim.

For the sake of speed, you can fire up the camera by swiping up on the home screen or by double-tapping the Home button at any time. Samsung says it only takes 0. By default, the Samsung camera app is straightforward; the shutter button and mode selector live on one end, and a quick tap reveals controls for your flash, timer and HDR on the other.

If you’re anything like me, you’ll be working with this default configuration most of the time and the results won’t leave you complaining. You can, however, jump into a Pro mode where you can fiddle with your exposure, ISO and metering settings, and it’s easy enough to save those changes as a preset to be fired up later.

Pro mode aside, you’ve got your usual slew of kooky features to play with, but the new ones are worth pointing out. Kicking the camera into background defocus mode is a nifty little attraction that lets you selectively blur parts of your shots, sort of like a Lytro, but all in software.

Thing is, you can often coax that sort of bokeh from the lens and camera without software trickery at all so long as you stick the phone close to your subject. There’s a Virtual shot mode that captures a 3D video of an object if you can move around it smoothly enough too, and it’s cool enough until you realize you can’t share it and still maintain the flashy effect.

The ability to record 4K video is back as well, and with the same five-minute limitation Samsung aficionados will already be familiar with. Most of the video I shot between the two devices was on par with the still photos I took, and a new object-tracking autofocus a feature I’m used to seeing more in DSLRs usually works like a charm too.

At the end of the day, I’d still give the photographic edge to the iPhones, but it’s an awfully tight race and Android fans can buy an S6 or S6 Edge without fear of working at a disadvantage.

With each passing year we demand more and more from our tiny pocket-computers, especially when they’re hyped up the way flagships are. The hype was especially boisterous this year: A crush of reports maintained that Samsung was originally on the Snapdragon train, before it ditched the in favor of silicon of its own making.

When it comes to regular, day-to-day performance, the differences are slight. That’s to be expected, really; we’re inching toward an age so profuse with processing power, so rife with RAM that flicking through home screens and firing up apps on flagship phones is nearly seamless.

Both the S6 and the Edge were incredibly snappy, with virtually zero lag during normal use. I could usually coax the phones to take a little longer than normal to figure out what to do next, but the keyword there is “coax” — we’re talking opening apps and leaping between them faster than anyone would ever need to just to be an ass.

Whenever I used the phone as I normally would, both devices were basically butter. Speaking of butter, it wouldn’t surprise me if devices running the Snapdragon occasionally ran warm enough to melt some.

That was supposedly the reason Samsung ditched the chipset altogether, and if true, the folks in Korea made the right call. Graphics – and processor-intensive tasks usually push smartphones to their limits, so I spent about 45 minutes sifting through the auto-firing tedium that is Dead Trigger 2.

The S6 and Edge scarcely warmed up at all. Ditto for the hours I spent drifting around Asphalt 8 with the visual quality cranked all the way up. The phones got a touch warmer while I was running some benchmark tests, but the heat buildup was nowhere near as noticeable as it was on the M9.

That the S6 and Edge would be super-snappy was sort of a given, but the bigger question is how long they’ll last before they need a trip to the power outlet. Before we tackle that, it’s worth noting that the two S6s aren’t identical in this regard: The basic S6 has a 2,mAh battery while the Edge has a slightly bigger 2,mAh one.

Oh, and don’t forget that both batteries are sealed too; the age of swapping spare cells into your new Galaxy S is finally over, I’m afraid. Samsung says its new line of 14nm Exynos processors are designed to deliver more horsepower at greater efficiency, which leads to both versions of the phone sticking around for between 11 and 12 hours of continuous workday use which in my case consists of horsing around on social networks, firing off emails in CloudMagic, taking a smattering of calls and the occasional prolonged bathroom break playing games.

That’s not shabby, but it does lag slightly behind the 13 hours I regularly squeezed out of the One M9 and my old Galaxy S5. Neither device really dazzled in our standard Engadget rundown test, either.

With a p video set to loop with the cellular and WiFi radios on and the screen brightness set to 50 percent, the S6 only lasted eight hours and 49 minutes. Meanwhile, the Edge and its very slightly bigger battery hung in there for nine hours and two minutes before finally giving up the ghost.

In case you’re wondering, both died about an hour before last year’s Galaxy S5 did, although they beat out the HTC One M9 by about 40 minutes. Thankfully, all of this is offset a bit by the fact that both devices recharge quickly; think: This is shaping up to be an awesome time to buy a smartphone, as some of the biggest players have already revealed their flagships for the year.

It made its US debut at nearly the same time as the S6 and the S6 Edge, and with it comes a very familiar set of design genes, Qualcomm’s shiny new Snapdragon chipset and a mostly great set of speakers.

If anything, its tragic flaw is the megapixel camera sitting high on its back. During my weeks of testing, I couldn’t reliably get photos that were better than what last year’s M8 was capable of.

Honestly, the average consumer probably won’t be able to tell, but the issue is made doubly troubling by the fact that the S6 duo’s cameras are among the best I’ve ever seen in a smartphone.

While the left and right of the S6 Edge’s screen curve away from you, the Flex2’s top and bottom curve toward you — the idea is your media will suck you in when you turn the thing on its side.

Not as much as I’d like. Alas, LG’s usually light touches with its Android overlays were just weighty enough to slow down day-to-day usage. And pardon me for getting a little meta, but the S6 Edge’s biggest competitor is none other than the regular S6.

Unless you absolutely love and I mean love the curved look, you can safely buy an S6 and know that you’re not missing out on anything of crucial importance. Then, of course, there’s the iPhone.

Say what you will about Samsung taking design cues from Cupertino — if you’re not sure whether to go iOS or Android, your decision just got a lot tougher. Apple’s ecosystem usually gets buzzy new apps before Android does, and I’d say the cameras on the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus more the latter, really are just a hair better.

Still, the combination of some top-notch hardware and a version of TouchWiz that’s mostly a pleasure to use means I’m considering dropping my iPhone 6 in favor of an S6 Edge as my full-time daily driver.

Now, if only my friends would all use something other than iMessage. I’ve never been a huge fan of Samsung phones. For years, the software felt too kludgy, the designs chintzy and scattershot.

Not so this time. Samsung has in the S6 a flagship that feels well thought-out and complete in a way I wasn’t sure the company was capable of anymore. Calling it “perfect” would be irresponsible and inaccurate, but the S6 is the closest Samsung has come in a long time.

Then there’s the Edge. If it hasn’t become abundantly clear already, let me belabor the point one last time: There is no functional benefit to owning this thing. It does everything the regular S6 does, and what few edge-friendly tricks it packs aren’t even all that useful.

The only real reason to buy it is because you like the way it looks — and I do. I really, really do. Together, they’re the brightest stars in Samsung’s galaxy, and the S6 in particular will rightfully wind up in a lot of people’s pockets.

If you’ve got cash to burn, though, or if you’re a real sucker for the new and beautiful, the S6 Edge might just be what you’ve been searching for. Apple’s red iPhone 8 and 8 Plus go on sale tomorrow.

Galaxy S6 and S6 Edge review 73 Photos Pros Sturdy, stylish design Impeccable camera experience Great day-to-day performance TouchWiz is finallyworth using.

Cons Battery life could be better Fingerprint sensor can be flaky It’s not waterproof No microSD or removable battery. Summary Samsung has a lot riding on its flagship, and this time it’s put its best foot forward.

Pros Stunning design The curved screen is gorgeous Impeccable camera experience Great day-to-day performance. Cons The curved screen doesn’t do much Battery life could be better No microSD or removable battery It’s not waterproof.

Summary This more expensive version of the Galaxy S6 banks it all on looks. Hardware Before we go any further, know this: Display and sound If you wanted to skip this section outright, just know this before you go: Software Like every other phone maker worth its salt, Samsung has spent the past year or two slowly cranking down on the sheer amount of stuff it slops on top of stock Android.

Samsung’s newer, lighter TouchWiz 49 Photos Now, I was plenty and surprisingly fond of TouchWiz’s style the moment I fired up these phones, but you can choose from about 12 different themes if you’re itching for something else.

Right now Samsung’s Theme Store leans heavily toward the cutesy side with themes that feature super-simple, hand-drawn icon sets and artwork; the only deviation from the norm is a tie-in theme for The Avengers: Nothing like the smell of brand synergy, right?

A quick tap on the Recent Apps button brings up the usual deck of app cards, but you’ll notice a Multi Window icon on some of them — tapping that’ll resize the app to take up half the screen, leaving enough room to either see the app running beneath it or resize another one to fill the other half completely.

Works like a charm when you need it I’ll admit to simultaneously browsing Facebook and Instagram in my weakest moments, and it’s so much less of a headache to activate now. Oh, and while we’re talking about apps, no, you cannot uninstall whatever you want by pressing, holding and tapping a delete icon.

Trying it on an app you’ve downloaded works fine. Try it on a preloaded app say, S Health and you’ll instead get a prompt to disable it; that is, you can shut it off, but you can’t remove it from the phone.

What about stuff you don’t want to delete, but don’t want anyone else seeing? Private mode is still around and ready to keep your media and files out of the wrong hands. What’s more, the fingerprint sensor baked into the Home button is both better just press your finger into it, no swipe required and easier to set up.

S Health has gotten some improvements too, although most of them are in appearance only; health data like your steps taken and heart rate recordings appear in a grid that reminds me an awful lot of Withings’ health app.

It’s easy to add or remove categories from the grid, and all the usual tricks, like measuring the amount of oxygen in your blood, are present and accounted for. Curiously, the UV-sensing feature that we spotted on the Note 4’s version of the app is gone here, but hey, I hardly ever used it other than to prove to others I could.

Also missing is perhaps the most interesting trick Samsung has up its sleeve: Both the S6 and S6 Edge can technically transmit payments with the traditional mag-stripe readers found in most retail stores, but those chops will go untested until the app that ties everything together launches later this year.

Using the Edge This is where you might expect the Edge to shine. Camera The cameras in Samsung’s high-end phones have always been at least above average, but that’s not good enough anymore. That’s always seemed like something Android devices have had trouble with and I’m happy to report the S6 and S6 Edge are — finally — definite exceptions to the rule.

All the photos you’ll see in the gallery above were shot with everything set to auto and with HDR off, and I’ve dumped them into this Flickr album in case you want to take a closer look. Performance and battery life With each passing year we demand more and more from our tiny pocket-computers, especially when they’re hyped up the way flagships are.

Android devices tested in Chrome; lower scores are better. The competition This is shaping up to be an awesome time to buy a smartphone, as some of the biggest players have already revealed their flagships for the year.

Wrap-up I’ve never been a huge fan of Samsung phones. Some people seem to say its battery life is not good though they don’t use much, but I assume they are leaving apps working in the background.

I close them regularly. I think this one, which doesn’t have water poof function like iPhone, releases its heat very quickly. It is expensive, but when you use it with its official case, this looks as good as Xperia or iPhone.

Its high CPU makes this phone not for everyone, but this would be the best device for those who would like to try many new things. I bought this on the next day it came on the market.

This is a review after having used it since then. This is narrower than that vertically, so it fits in my small hand and is easy to use. I don’t mind its thickness.

I find it easier to operate. I find it difficult to press. I replaced my phone thinking the battery life would get improved I thought I had read that the battery life was good before its debut, but it has been as bad as my previous phone which I had bought over two years ago since the very first day I bought it.

I even thought memory cleaner app is broken. In the end, I decided on this. I would like to write a review comparing them. I thought it was close to iPhone6. Note Edge was so big that it made me tired just by holding it, and Aquos Serie was too thick.

It now is getting difficult to find an Android phone with a physical home button. It is good that it has fingerprint authentication like iPhone6. You don’t have to swipe it like you do with Note Edge or phones from Fujitsu but you only have to press it; it improves the recognition.

The merit of having a physical button with fingerprint authentication is that you don’t have to use the power button on the side which is difficult to use, and you can restart from sleep easily and surely while you get your fingerprint recognized.

With Xperia, you can press sleep screen twice, and with Aquos, it has grip magic; all makes are thinking of better ways, but they still don’t work perfect and are stressful. Considering how quick fingerprint authentication is, the choice would be either iPhone or Galaxy.

Also, back button and history button are located on the sides, so it doesn’t have key on the display, which means I can use the screen fully. Samsung must have thought it over.

But the visibility of the Edge is bad with light’s reflection. Even with Aquos, which has good reputation for long battery life, it uses a lot of power when GPS is on, so I think it is up to your setting.

I don’t feel it is worse than iPhone6. But Aquos is too good, so I give this 4 stars. So data, which you cannot show to other people, should be secured in the phone itself. The capacity is 64GB, too.

If you are not happy with pushy iOS and would like to change to Android phones, this would be the best choice. Rather than devising not to be called it is a copy of iPhone, looking this similar is easier to understand and easier to choose.

Possibly because of this device, when I watch YouTube videos or listen to music, the volume sometimes goes up and down. It is not stable. The edge display on its sides, which are one of the characteristics of this phone, works when I just try to pick it up while watching movies or browsing leaving it on a desk.

There are not many protection films which cover the Edge. Also, there are less covers compatible with this compared to S6. To those who play Minecraft PE. Because of the Edge display, control buttons become so small.

Even when you make them the biggest they can be by changing the setting, they only become as big as your thumb. It is a little difficult to play compared to other devices. This is big for women, so I assume there are some people who are thinking about using a banker ring.

Actually I am one of them. But when you put it on glassy bit of the back, it comes off easily. If you want to put it on, you might have to stick it over a cover. The edge helps making images or movies three-dimensional, but that’s about it.

Other functions are inconvenient and not usable. It is slippery, but it has no problems as I put a protection cover on its back. I put it in an inside pocket of my jacket, but I have no problem with it.

My previous phone was of other make, but I got used to it right away. I watch movies when I commute by train, and I had no problem watching against the light. It is bright, too.

Of course it uses a lot when you use it with full power. I am using a contactless charger, and I find it convenient. It charges up even when I place it carelessly.

I can connect it with PC using wi-fi easily. I use it conveniently. It looks good, but it is difficult to use. But I am not happy with it now I actually have used it; it is jumpy and difficult to hold.

I cannot deny that it is copying the design of iPhone or Xperia, but it is better for users when it’s cooler, so I find it good. The camera on its back is still uncool, though. I assume many people don’t like it, but I personally like it.

But it had no problem for daily use. Even considering the fact that Xperia Z3C was too good, this is terrible. They should have made it thicker, say 7. But the battery is terrible.

This is really a waste. They shouldn’t have worried about thinness, but attached importance to practicality. It is so fashionable that I wonder if it is OK for a man to have it. The design of the Edge is perfect, too.

It is very easy to operate. Fingerprint authentication is very fast, too. My previous phone annoyed me to bits, so I am very satisfied with this. My frustration is gone.

Nothing to complain about. The previous phone was beautiful, too, but it still is beautiful. It is easy to see in the daylight, too! As for music, it sounds good when you use an earphone.

I was to buy XperiaZ4, but I couldn’t wait for it to be released, and XperiaZ4 didn’t have purple in its color choice, I chose this thinking there shouldn’t be difference in their performance.

This is my first Galaxy, and I am very happy with it. I met a good device after a long time. This is a review based on my experience of using Galaxy S6 edge along with iPhone5s and its previous model Galaxy S5.

I think both men and women can use it without looking too much. It is not too flashy like iPhone5S, so it suits for both formal and casual occasions.

The screen has fluorine coating, so even though I am using it without a film, scratches and fingerprints don’t stand out. It doesn’t have non-slip surface on its back like S5 did, so you need to be careful not to drop it.

Double pressing the button starts the camera, and its response is great. It makes taking photos fun. This is an advantage other Android devices don’t have.

The response of iPhone’s keyboard itself is excellent, but it doesn’t have Google Japanese input yet. Also, possibly because of Apple’s strict restriction or lack of memory, it is still rough.

Android is far more convenient in terms of IME. Old Android phones didn’t work smoothly compared to iPhone, but it doesn’t apply to current Android phones. I don’t know if it is thanks to octa-core and Lollipop, but now it feels it does better than iPhone for its response.

Changing apps, text input, the speed of scrolling when browsing using Chrome, Twitter and Google plus have been improved a lot compared to S5. It is very convenient as I can mute it depending on days or time like with iPhone’s sleep mode.

Also, it has light on notification panel, which I find convenient, too. I even get smitten with its beautifulness compared to iPhone5S’s Retina display. The visibility outside is improved compared to S5.

I don’t feel it has a particularly long life. I feel I need to charge it to use it after work. It even had a movie of ice bucket challenge, and it gave me sense of security that it is OK to use it roughly.

It is a pity that it doesn’t have that function. Also, it is disappointing for heavy users that it doesn’t take SD cards and the battery is not changeable. I think dust and water proof and SD cards are Android’s signature.

They didn’t need to copy iPhone here. The camera is excellent. This probably is the best smartphone at the moment, which has been proved with the amazing number it showed with foreign Dxo bench mark.

It takes very beautiful photos when it had enough lighting without shakes. It is very sharp, and it is better than iPhone5S. S5 sometimes takes better photos outside, but for night view and inside, S6 does much better.

Cameras of smartphones are to take photos at sudden good photo opportunities or take photos casually, so the function of starting the camera by double pressing the home button is an amazing function.

Having said that, as for AF, I feel S5 did better. Also, it had touch panel shutter function which allows its users to take photos just by touching the part they want focused, but S6 doesn’t have that function as default.

I am sorry if it’s just me not being able to find that function. I didn’t see much improvement in iPhone6. Most smartphones at the moment don’t have much room for technological improvement, but Galaxy series gives me impression of innovative change like with Galaxy Note Edge and Galaxy Note.

Having said that, I don’t know if it’s worth paying 90,yen. It would have been perfect if it had a removable battery, dust and water proof functions and SD cards. Even when it is a monster smartphone with high spec, if I have to worry about battery life and watch less movies and dim the screen light, it is misplacing the priorities.

Also, because it uses glass all over, I hesitate to use it without a case especially with this price. In terms of this, S5 which allows me to use it roughly with its water proof function and changeable covers with removable batteries, suits me better.

Battery life or toughness is more important than response or image quality of cameras. S6 made me realize how good S5 was, and I am thinking making S5 my main machine again from S6 edge.

LOL This is not as flashy as it looks at shops. I like how the Edge feels against my hand. The machined metal part gets caught in my palm, so it is less slippery. My previous phone was Xperia Z2, and it was slippery.

So I find this being non-slip is very helpful. The fact that Z2 being heavy helps me feel so, too. I think this probably is by far the lightest among the current models in this size. Its thinness is good, too.

I’m happy that it doesn’t get bulky in my chest pocket. The best thing about it is that I can start the camera just by pressing the home button twice. It took forever for Xperia to start camera, so I feel a world away from when I was using it.

By using an app, I customized to start an app by pressing the home button once. I secure this with a handlebar mount on my bike to use it as a bicycle computer. I cannot use finger print authentication over the case, which I find inconvenient.

I assume it cannot be helped, though. Home button is convenient, but I also find it good that I can turn the display on by gestures. Especially when I place it on a desk, it is bothersome to press the home button every time.

Also, it is unstable when I am charging wirelessly, so I use it a lot. It makes S6 with 2K works lightly. I don’t know how it does with games as I don’t play games. Evaluating this for starting the app or switching, this works by far the best.

There are many functions that I cannot change the settings or the settings I don’t know, so I don’t think I can use it fully unless I use it a lot with the settings set carefully.

The notification display is easy to see and use. The setting of the phone is not as good as Xperia, which is disappointing. The visibility when I’m outside under the sun is good enough, too.

Having said that, the sound quality is not bad. So I give it three stars. Sound volume wise, S6 has bigger sound. Original music player is easy to use. Now I can use Walkman with the phones which are not Xperia, but I’m sticking to the original one.

The battery it uses while at sleep cannot be beat Xperia. Xperia’s stamina mode is too good. The battery usage while using it as usual is the same. So unless you go out all day, you wouldn’t have any problem.

Because I have a power bank compatible with Quick Charge 2. Wireless charger is very convenient as I only have to place it. So it gets charged full all the time when I am at desk.

It starts in a second, and it has excellent auto white balance. Auto focusing is fast and accurate. It is better than Xperia Z2 in every way. Well, actually, it is not even comparable.

It takes a lot of photos that you don’t have to edit to use. This does well not only with photos but also with movies, too. Its great auto focusing function makes the difference.

It does have some points where I find a little disappointing like setting for telephone functions, but I am glad I bought this. I thought it would be inconvenient when it doesn’t take SD cards, but 64GB was enough, and I have no problem with it.

The writing speed when I transferred data of music and movies to S6 Edge was amazingly fast, too. You cannot appreciate this lightness and easiness to hold just by trying it at shops.

S7 Edge will improve, too, so I feel I won’t be able to resist it. I was impressed that I could scroll down Twitter official app really fast without stopping.

Nexus 6 is as fast as this, so I assume it is thanks to Android 5. I feel iPhone slow. Because it doesn’t use backlight, my eyes get less tired. My eyes get a lot less tired compared to when I use Xperia or iPhone.

This is better than other device which are compatible with VoLTE. This is not as good as Fujitsu FG. It feels this is slightly better than iPhone. When I show this to my friends who use iPhone, they all say they might try Android next.

I was worried that my finger could touch the Edge screen and cause malfunctions, but it seems they have thought about it; it has no problems. It is not water resistant, it doesn’t take SD card and the battery is not changeable and it could deteriorate.

That means we’re looking at two of the most pixel-dense screens on the market today. As far as your eyes will be able to tell, individual pixels don’t even exist.

Whether or not modern smartphone screens actually need to be this insanely crisp is a question that’s up for debate, but my stance is pretty simple: As long as battery life doesn’t tank as a result, bring ’em on.

A quick bit of screen nerdery for you: Some of this is going to be subjective, of course. I’ll admit I like my screens a little punchy, and the S6’s color settings suited me just fine out of the box.

If that’s not your taste, you can pop into the settings and swap screen modes to something more appropriate: Then you’ve got the “Basic” setting, which just sucks the life out of everything.

It’s arguably the most accurate mode of the four, but really, where’s the fun in that? Viewing angles on the S6 are great too — a lucky break for the poor soul whose in-flight entertainment system crapped out and has to watch your episodes of The Fall from the side.

So far I’ve been treating both screens as if they were the same, but that’s clearly not true. The Note Edge wanted to cram gobs of functionality into that spillover area.

The S6 Edge does none of those things. It just sort of I’ll break down more what the screen’s edges actually can do down in the software section, but Samsung’s overriding concern here was making a screen that looks awesome, and on that front, it succeeded.

At its most severe, the Edge’s screen curves away from you at about 35 degrees, as if the sides are retreating into your palms. Let’s put our nitpicker hats on for a second — that means that from some oblique angles, the stuff that flows into those subtle curves will appear much brighter than it does on the flat part of the screen.

It’s the mildest of annoyances I don’t remember ever being bothered by it, but it’ll definitely stand out at first. So yes, the S6 and the S6 Edge look lovely. How do they sound?

Both devices share the same single speaker nestled into the bottom-right corners of their frames, and it’s dramatically louder than the clunker we got in last year’s Galaxy S5. There’s no way it’ll ever hold a candle to the One M9 and its pair of BoomSound speakers, but the S6 duo’s driver brings enough oomph to the table that you can stick the phone into your car’s cupholder, crank up the volume and still hear plenty over the din of the road.

Like every other phone maker worth its salt, Samsung has spent the past year or two slowly cranking down on the sheer amount of stuff it slops on top of stock Android. It really shows, too: Turns out, chopping out extraneous menu options and visual cruft was high up on the company’s list of priorities this year, so don’t ever let anyone tell you that complaining ad nauseam can’t get huge conglomerates to rethink their plans.

Anyway, all of Samsung’s greatest hits are still here, and they’re paired with a flatter, cleaner, Material Design-y look that jibes nicely with Android 5.

Seriously, it’s terribly refreshing if you’re coming from a Galaxy S5. Swiping to the left once again reveals your Flipboard Briefing, a BlinkFeed – like stream of news stories culled from news sources around the web.

It might not pull choice updates from your Twitter or Instagram accounts like on an HTC phone, but it does look a hell of a lot handsomer. The app launcher itself is a little less attractive, at least at first.

By default, Samsung has arranged all of its apps including Microsoft pack-ins like OneNote and OneDrive and everything else you install gets tacked on the end of the list in the order you downloaded it.

Thankfully, there’s an “A-Z” button in the corner to whip things into more manageable shape. Oh, and you can resize the app grid on your home screen to accommodate up to 20 shortcuts, not including widgets.

This is where you might expect the Edge to shine. After all, the test balloon that was the Note Edge used that extra space extensively, right? I’d argue the big Edge tried to shoehorn as many little gimmicks as it could into that little side-screen does anyone really need a ruler on their phones?

Swiping in from the upper left or right part of the screen you’ll indicate during setup if you’re a righty or lefty causes an array of colored bubbles to drift into view.

You can assign up to five people their own specific color, so that when they contact you, the edge of the phone will spring to life with their assigned hue. It’s a neat trick, for sure, but its value is limited.

To start, why the limit on five people and colors? And if the edge that lights up happens to be pointing away from you, you might as well just flip the phone over and see who it is instead of turning it around to see what color is throbbing.

Meanwhile, rubbing the edge of the screen while it’s off causes Samsung’s so-called Information Stream to pop up, giving you access to the time, notifications and news updates without lighting up the whole panel.

Truly, it’s so much more convenient to tap the Home button to see all that than to stroke the edge of a screen; in fact, it’s so much easier that to even bother just seems silly. It’d be another story if the news headline that showed up was somehow tied to your preferences as set in Flipboard Briefing, but nope — it’s just some random nothing from Yahoo News.

Oh, and you can turn on a clock that’ll live on the edge until the battery level drops below 15 percent. That’s the only truly useful feature in the mix The thing is, I appreciate that Samsung didn’t try to bog the Edge down with nonsense, but in doing so, it proved it still doesn’t know what to do with that extra space.

That’d be a greater sin if the screen didn’t look so damned cool, but none of this helps sell the Edge to anyone who’s on the fence. The cameras in Samsung’s high-end phones have always been at least above average, but that’s not good enough anymore.

Nailing the camera was just crucial this time around and, long story short, Samsung did a great job. But first, the broad strokes. The S6 and the Edge share the same megapixel rear camera made by Sony, no less, which doesn’t sound incredibly impressive compared to some of the other sensors used in other phones.

Performance in low light is mostly great too, though you’ll occasionally have to tap to focus a few times to make sure you’re actually homing in on what you wanted. HDR mode can help tremendously here when photons are scarce, but it’s best used when you’re photographing dim landscapes or subjects that can sit still.

The fact that we’ve got a beautiful Quad-HD AMOLED screen to view them on is a huge plus too though your screen color settings might mean the actual photo looks different on your phone than on a computer or television.

Meanwhile, the wide-angle lens on the 5-megapixel front-facing camera makes for some seriously spacious selfies — it captures way more of your surroundings than you might expect, so bring the phone in close for the best results.

Just be sure to dial down Beauty Mode to keep your face from looking like you got plastered with foundation. That’s not to say the camera experience is perfect; the auto-exposure can be a little finicky sometimes, leading to some overly warm shots when things get dim.

For the sake of speed, you can fire up the camera by swiping up on the home screen or by double-tapping the Home button at any time. Samsung says it only takes 0.

By default, the Samsung camera app is straightforward; the shutter button and mode selector live on one end, and a quick tap reveals controls for your flash, timer and HDR on the other.

If you’re anything like me, you’ll be working with this default configuration most of the time and the results won’t leave you complaining. You can, however, jump into a Pro mode where you can fiddle with your exposure, ISO and metering settings, and it’s easy enough to save those changes as a preset to be fired up later.

Pro mode aside, you’ve got your usual slew of kooky features to play with, but the new ones are worth pointing out. Kicking the camera into background defocus mode is a nifty little attraction that lets you selectively blur parts of your shots, sort of like a Lytro, but all in software.

Thing is, you can often coax that sort of bokeh from the lens and camera without software trickery at all so long as you stick the phone close to your subject. There’s a Virtual shot mode that captures a 3D video of an object if you can move around it smoothly enough too, and it’s cool enough until you realize you can’t share it and still maintain the flashy effect.

The ability to record 4K video is back as well, and with the same five-minute limitation Samsung aficionados will already be familiar with. Most of the video I shot between the two devices was on par with the still photos I took, and a new object-tracking autofocus a feature I’m used to seeing more in DSLRs usually works like a charm too.

At the end of the day, I’d still give the photographic edge to the iPhones, but it’s an awfully tight race and Android fans can buy an S6 or S6 Edge without fear of working at a disadvantage.

With each passing year we demand more and more from our tiny pocket-computers, especially when they’re hyped up the way flagships are. The hype was especially boisterous this year: A crush of reports maintained that Samsung was originally on the Snapdragon train, before it ditched the in favor of silicon of its own making.

When it comes to regular, day-to-day performance, the differences are slight. That’s to be expected, really; we’re inching toward an age so profuse with processing power, so rife with RAM that flicking through home screens and firing up apps on flagship phones is nearly seamless.

Both the S6 and the Edge were incredibly snappy, with virtually zero lag during normal use. I could usually coax the phones to take a little longer than normal to figure out what to do next, but the keyword there is “coax” — we’re talking opening apps and leaping between them faster than anyone would ever need to just to be an ass.

Whenever I used the phone as I normally would, both devices were basically butter. Speaking of butter, it wouldn’t surprise me if devices running the Snapdragon occasionally ran warm enough to melt some.

That was supposedly the reason Samsung ditched the chipset altogether, and if true, the folks in Korea made the right call. Graphics – and processor-intensive tasks usually push smartphones to their limits, so I spent about 45 minutes sifting through the auto-firing tedium that is Dead Trigger 2.

The S6 and Edge scarcely warmed up at all. Ditto for the hours I spent drifting around Asphalt 8 with the visual quality cranked all the way up. The phones got a touch warmer while I was running some benchmark tests, but the heat buildup was nowhere near as noticeable as it was on the M9.

That the S6 and Edge would be super-snappy was sort of a given, but the bigger question is how long they’ll last before they need a trip to the power outlet. Before we tackle that, it’s worth noting that the two S6s aren’t identical in this regard: The basic S6 has a 2,mAh battery while the Edge has a slightly bigger 2,mAh one.

Oh, and don’t forget that both batteries are sealed too; the age of swapping spare cells into your new Galaxy S is finally over, I’m afraid. Samsung says its new line of 14nm Exynos processors are designed to deliver more horsepower at greater efficiency, which leads to both versions of the phone sticking around for between 11 and 12 hours of continuous workday use which in my case consists of horsing around on social networks, firing off emails in CloudMagic, taking a smattering of calls and the occasional prolonged bathroom break playing games.

That’s not shabby, but it does lag slightly behind the 13 hours I regularly squeezed out of the One M9 and my old Galaxy S5. Neither device really dazzled in our standard Engadget rundown test, either.

With a p video set to loop with the cellular and WiFi radios on and the screen brightness set to 50 percent, the S6 only lasted eight hours and 49 minutes. Meanwhile, the Edge and its very slightly bigger battery hung in there for nine hours and two minutes before finally giving up the ghost.

In case you’re wondering, both died about an hour before last year’s Galaxy S5 did, although they beat out the HTC One M9 by about 40 minutes. Thankfully, all of this is offset a bit by the fact that both devices recharge quickly; think: This is shaping up to be an awesome time to buy a smartphone, as some of the biggest players have already revealed their flagships for the year.

It made its US debut at nearly the same time as the S6 and the S6 Edge, and with it comes a very familiar set of design genes, Qualcomm’s shiny new Snapdragon chipset and a mostly great set of speakers.

If anything, its tragic flaw is the megapixel camera sitting high on its back. During my weeks of testing, I couldn’t reliably get photos that were better than what last year’s M8 was capable of.

Honestly, the average consumer probably won’t be able to tell, but the issue is made doubly troubling by the fact that the S6 duo’s cameras are among the best I’ve ever seen in a smartphone. While the left and right of the S6 Edge’s screen curve away from you, the Flex2’s top and bottom curve toward you — the idea is your media will suck you in when you turn the thing on its side.

Not as much as I’d like. Alas, LG’s usually light touches with its Android overlays were just weighty enough to slow down day-to-day usage. And pardon me for getting a little meta, but the S6 Edge’s biggest competitor is none other than the regular S6.

Unless you absolutely love and I mean love the curved look, you can safely buy an S6 and know that you’re not missing out on anything of crucial importance.

Then, of course, there’s the iPhone. Even considering the fact that Xperia Z3C was too good, this is terrible. They should have made it thicker, say 7. But the battery is terrible. This is really a waste.

They shouldn’t have worried about thinness, but attached importance to practicality. It is so fashionable that I wonder if it is OK for a man to have it. The design of the Edge is perfect, too.

It is very easy to operate. Fingerprint authentication is very fast, too. My previous phone annoyed me to bits, so I am very satisfied with this. My frustration is gone.

Nothing to complain about. The previous phone was beautiful, too, but it still is beautiful. It is easy to see in the daylight, too! As for music, it sounds good when you use an earphone.

I was to buy XperiaZ4, but I couldn’t wait for it to be released, and XperiaZ4 didn’t have purple in its color choice, I chose this thinking there shouldn’t be difference in their performance.

This is my first Galaxy, and I am very happy with it. I met a good device after a long time. This is a review based on my experience of using Galaxy S6 edge along with iPhone5s and its previous model Galaxy S5.

I think both men and women can use it without looking too much. It is not too flashy like iPhone5S, so it suits for both formal and casual occasions. The screen has fluorine coating, so even though I am using it without a film, scratches and fingerprints don’t stand out.

It doesn’t have non-slip surface on its back like S5 did, so you need to be careful not to drop it. Double pressing the button starts the camera, and its response is great. It makes taking photos fun.

This is an advantage other Android devices don’t have. The response of iPhone’s keyboard itself is excellent, but it doesn’t have Google Japanese input yet. Also, possibly because of Apple’s strict restriction or lack of memory, it is still rough.

Android is far more convenient in terms of IME. Old Android phones didn’t work smoothly compared to iPhone, but it doesn’t apply to current Android phones. I don’t know if it is thanks to octa-core and Lollipop, but now it feels it does better than iPhone for its response.

Changing apps, text input, the speed of scrolling when browsing using Chrome, Twitter and Google plus have been improved a lot compared to S5. It is very convenient as I can mute it depending on days or time like with iPhone’s sleep mode.

Also, it has light on notification panel, which I find convenient, too. I even get smitten with its beautifulness compared to iPhone5S’s Retina display. The visibility outside is improved compared to S5.

I don’t feel it has a particularly long life. I feel I need to charge it to use it after work. It even had a movie of ice bucket challenge, and it gave me sense of security that it is OK to use it roughly.

It is a pity that it doesn’t have that function. Also, it is disappointing for heavy users that it doesn’t take SD cards and the battery is not changeable. I think dust and water proof and SD cards are Android’s signature.

They didn’t need to copy iPhone here. The camera is excellent. This probably is the best smartphone at the moment, which has been proved with the amazing number it showed with foreign Dxo bench mark.

It takes very beautiful photos when it had enough lighting without shakes. It is very sharp, and it is better than iPhone5S. S5 sometimes takes better photos outside, but for night view and inside, S6 does much better.

Cameras of smartphones are to take photos at sudden good photo opportunities or take photos casually, so the function of starting the camera by double pressing the home button is an amazing function.

Having said that, as for AF, I feel S5 did better. Also, it had touch panel shutter function which allows its users to take photos just by touching the part they want focused, but S6 doesn’t have that function as default.

I am sorry if it’s just me not being able to find that function. I didn’t see much improvement in iPhone6. Most smartphones at the moment don’t have much room for technological improvement, but Galaxy series gives me impression of innovative change like with Galaxy Note Edge and Galaxy Note.

Having said that, I don’t know if it’s worth paying 90,yen. It would have been perfect if it had a removable battery, dust and water proof functions and SD cards. Even when it is a monster smartphone with high spec, if I have to worry about battery life and watch less movies and dim the screen light, it is misplacing the priorities.

Also, because it uses glass all over, I hesitate to use it without a case especially with this price. In terms of this, S5 which allows me to use it roughly with its water proof function and changeable covers with removable batteries, suits me better.

Battery life or toughness is more important than response or image quality of cameras. S6 made me realize how good S5 was, and I am thinking making S5 my main machine again from S6 edge. LOL This is not as flashy as it looks at shops.

I like how the Edge feels against my hand. The machined metal part gets caught in my palm, so it is less slippery. My previous phone was Xperia Z2, and it was slippery.

So I find this being non-slip is very helpful. The fact that Z2 being heavy helps me feel so, too. I think this probably is by far the lightest among the current models in this size.

Its thinness is good, too. I’m happy that it doesn’t get bulky in my chest pocket. The best thing about it is that I can start the camera just by pressing the home button twice. It took forever for Xperia to start camera, so I feel a world away from when I was using it.

By using an app, I customized to start an app by pressing the home button once. I secure this with a handlebar mount on my bike to use it as a bicycle computer. I cannot use finger print authentication over the case, which I find inconvenient.

I assume it cannot be helped, though. Home button is convenient, but I also find it good that I can turn the display on by gestures. Especially when I place it on a desk, it is bothersome to press the home button every time.

Also, it is unstable when I am charging wirelessly, so I use it a lot. It makes S6 with 2K works lightly. I don’t know how it does with games as I don’t play games.

Evaluating this for starting the app or switching, this works by far the best. There are many functions that I cannot change the settings or the settings I don’t know, so I don’t think I can use it fully unless I use it a lot with the settings set carefully.

The notification display is easy to see and use. The setting of the phone is not as good as Xperia, which is disappointing. The visibility when I’m outside under the sun is good enough, too.

Having said that, the sound quality is not bad. So I give it three stars. Sound volume wise, S6 has bigger sound. Original music player is easy to use. Now I can use Walkman with the phones which are not Xperia, but I’m sticking to the original one.

The battery it uses while at sleep cannot be beat Xperia. Xperia’s stamina mode is too good. The battery usage while using it as usual is the same. So unless you go out all day, you wouldn’t have any problem.

Because I have a power bank compatible with Quick Charge 2. Wireless charger is very convenient as I only have to place it. So it gets charged full all the time when I am at desk. It starts in a second, and it has excellent auto white balance.

Auto focusing is fast and accurate. It is better than Xperia Z2 in every way. Well, actually, it is not even comparable. It takes a lot of photos that you don’t have to edit to use.

This does well not only with photos but also with movies, too. Its great auto focusing function makes the difference. It does have some points where I find a little disappointing like setting for telephone functions, but I am glad I bought this.

I thought it would be inconvenient when it doesn’t take SD cards, but 64GB was enough, and I have no problem with it. The writing speed when I transferred data of music and movies to S6 Edge was amazingly fast, too.

You cannot appreciate this lightness and easiness to hold just by trying it at shops. S7 Edge will improve, too, so I feel I won’t be able to resist it. I was impressed that I could scroll down Twitter official app really fast without stopping.

Nexus 6 is as fast as this, so I assume it is thanks to Android 5. I feel iPhone slow. Because it doesn’t use backlight, my eyes get less tired. My eyes get a lot less tired compared to when I use Xperia or iPhone.

This is better than other device which are compatible with VoLTE. This is not as good as Fujitsu FG. It feels this is slightly better than iPhone. When I show this to my friends who use iPhone, they all say they might try Android next.

I was worried that my finger could touch the Edge screen and cause malfunctions, but it seems they have thought about it; it has no problems. It is not water resistant, it doesn’t take SD card and the battery is not changeable and it could deteriorate.

But I have never used it in the way that I would need to use two SD cards or would need the battery to get changed with my previous phones, so I have no problems with it though it can be a problem for heavy users.

Especially its design is playing a great role. I chose gold, and I put a blue fillip. I use iPhone5 and 6, but Galaxy 6Edge is better in terms of usability and its size. Wi-fi using at home got faster.

When I pick it up, the side is not vertical but it is more like a V shape. So with the help of the ledge of the camera, it is easy to pick it up. To be honest, this might be the shape I feel the most comfortable with among all the smartphones.

What I liked was its thicker bezel at the bottom. When I press on home button, I don’t touch the display thanks to it. Fingerprint authentication is so accurate that it is not even comparable with Galaxy S5 or Tab S.

Now I can unlock it with one hand stably. I think I can say this is as good as Apple products. It is not as good as specialized software like ATOK, but this is getting usable. The response when I play games Puzzle and Dragons has been improved dramatically, and it doesn’t have much lag.

It works smoothly when I am multitasking, too. I have never felt it to be too slow. This is just fast. You’ll have no problem if you are a Galaxy user. It feels like the thing in the image is existing right there.

Also, it has enough brightness, too. OEL has disadvantages of poor visibility when in outside, but this has been improved a lot and very easy to see. Compared to Note3, which had a built-in speaker at the bottom like this phone, it is much better in terms of skipping sounds.

It was a little disappointing, though, as I had heard the rumor of it having dual speaker with this model… The sound when using an earphone is very clear. This is as good or better than smartphones whose advantage is their sound.

When I played games for an hour adding to the usage above and did 1 hour more of browsing, it didn’t last a day. Of course I try not to play too much game as it uses battery a lot. I think it is pointless, though, trying not to play games with this device that has high-speed chip… Having said that, this is only a little worse than Note3, so thinking its battery capacity and resolution, this is excellent.

Charging it just by placing is not only convenient but it avoids its USB connector to break, too. So I am expecting I can use this for a long time. Well, of course the battery probably will die before that….

It is the fastest smartphone, and it also has great usability. This is called a king of Android for reasons. Dual edge helps it easy to hold, so I can recommend this to anyone.

Personally, it is surprising that you can buy this device with all the newest technology for 90,yen. S6 is the only device with 14mm processor so far. You would be happy even when your previous phone was Note3.

If I was to say, it would be perfect with better battery life! This is the first time I choose Galaxy over iPhone in case I only take one phone with me. This is that intuitive. I don’t know if it is thanks to Lollipop or not, but I don’t get stressed at all with this.

The question is how you recover from that state. I am happy with its quick charge along with its wireless charging. It is good that I can set it to last longer in case of emergency.

Sir mujhe J3 pro ka folder chayye meri screen crake ho gai hain mujhe khi nhi mil rahi hai kiya aap ke paas mil sakti hain. Every has to my read my opinion to this phone, I rate it perfectly 5 star because it has good and unique screen design and its camera is so awesome although the selfie camera is only 5 mp it seens Samsung Galaxy S6 edge 32GB.

Lowest Price P23, 10 Prices. Apr Smartphone, Android 5. Samsung Galaxy S7 edge. P17, – 65 Prices. Compare prices Specs Reviews Forum News. Overall Rating Design 4. Please feel free to post your review on this product.

Review by Japanese user Feb 19, This is amazing enough I got it for 20,yen in August This is just amazing. I cannot recommend this highly enough when you can buy this for 20,yen.

Review by Japanese user Jan 25, I used Galaxy for the first time after a long while. It is thin, and it looks shiny at the back. I can use it OK. The display arched at edges is cool, too.

Review by Japanese user Jun 21,

Galaxy edge samsung 32gb galaxy s6 samsung s6 32gb vs sensor still

Auto focusing is fast and accurate. I am using Nova Launcher. After all, the test balloon that was the Note Edge used that extra space extensively, right? The response of iPhone’s keyboard itself is excellent, but it doesn’t have Google Japanese input yet. My eyes get a lot less tired compared to when I use Xperia or iPhone. Even considering the fact that Xperia Z3C was too good, this is terrible.

So I find this being non-slip is very helpful. But when you put it on glassy bit of the back, it comes off easily. I takes beautiful night view photos which are so beautiful that it is difficult to believe that they are taken with a smartphone.

Even with Aquos, which has good reputation for long battery life, it uses a lot of power when GPS is on, so I think it is up to your setting. I am not using default ones. I am using Nova Launcher.

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Officejet s6 s6 galaxy samsung 32gb galaxy 32gb samsung edge vs free download windows

Auto focusing is fast and accurate. It would have been perfect if it had a removable battery, dust and water proof functions and SD cards. Overall Rating Design 4. See…

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