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Samsung galaxy note 8 tablet review

Samsung galaxy note 8 tablet review





Valid till 2017/5/25



Apr 09, · Overseas, it doubles as a phone. Here in the US, it’s just a tablet with an S Pen onboard. For its stateside debut, Samsung’s stripped the Galaxy Note of. Apr 09, · Watch video · The Samsung Galaxy Note 8 is a stunning tablet with a truly useful stylus, but it’s not worth $ unless you’re an artist or prefer pen input. Apr 17, · Samsung Galaxy Note review Has Samsung gone mad with so many different sized tablets and phones? Author: Phil Lavelle.
A quick e-mail reply or entering a search query just feels much more natural to scribble than tab out. In other words, if you search for “Thor,” Watch On returns a number of matching options. The pen-to-text translation software still misinterprets from time to time, however, and could use some better prediction software. With deep pen integration, remote control capability and superior multitasking, the Galaxy Note 8. If we dragged an app from this bar onto the desktop, the app would launch at full screen.
Apr 09, · Overseas, it doubles as a phone. Here in the US, it’s just a tablet with an S Pen onboard. For its stateside debut, Samsung’s stripped the Galaxy Note of. Apr 09, · Watch video · The Samsung Galaxy Note 8 is a stunning tablet with a truly useful stylus, but it’s not worth $ unless you’re an artist or prefer pen input. Apr 17, · Samsung Galaxy Note review Has Samsung gone mad with so many different sized tablets and phones? Author: Phil Lavelle.

samsung galaxy note 8 tablet review

samsung galaxy note 8 tablet review

samsung galaxy note 8 tablet review

samsung galaxy note 8 tablet review

samsung galaxy note 8 tablet review

samsung galaxy note 8 tablet review

samsung galaxy note 8 tablet review

samsung galaxy note 8 tablet review

Full 8 review galaxy tablet note samsung windows

Continue to next page 01 In fact, all hums along so smoothly that it’s easy to take the Note 8. Software features Since the release of the Note It includes typical social sharing “this is what I’m watching” options and seems like a pretty effective and accurate TV guide, but the real standout feature is its powerful and potentially very useful search. Users familiar with the Note II will undoubtedly reach behind the tablet, out of sheer habit, to detach the S Pen.

As a result of these buttons, we get back a small percentage of screen real estate that would otherwise be occupied by the Android nav bar. I’m thankful to have this space back, but making accommodations for the physical buttons’ placement will take some getting used to.

Somewhat inverse to that, while the physical home button is a very welcome addition, its convex nature makes it difficult to press with the stylus. The S Pen of course returns with its pressure sensitivity in tow and writing with it felt a lot less cumbersome here compared with on the Though of identical length, the S Pen has a smaller radius than the Note The grooved pen button is a bit smaller than before, making it less likely to elicit accidental presses.

The tablet includes palm rejection tech; however, if the skin on the knife edge of your hand folds in just the right way, making a “point,” the tablet will, much to my frustration, mistakenly believe you’re trying to write with it and accept inputs from it.

The Note 8’s 1,x resolution screen is one of the best I’ve seen on any tablet. Writing with the Stylus while holding the tablet will take some getting used to.

The front-facing camera sits off to the top-right corner on the front. The top edge holds the headphone jack. Software features Since the release of the Note The Note 8 reaps the benefit of the company’s hindsight as it includes not only the additions we’ve seen added to the Note The performance increases in that version appear to have been dramatic.

The Note 8 ships with Android 4. I personally have never had a problem with the colorful, somewhat Fisher-Price-ian look of the interface, but if you’ve never liked its more gaudy presentation, there’s nothing new here that’ll change your mind.

Samsung’s multi-windows feature, which allows for two simultaneous apps to run on the screen, has been thankfully enhanced. A deeper pool of apps is now compatible, including Twitter, Facebook, and Chrome, and each window can be easily resized, Windows 8 style.

The feature feels more at home here on the Note 8 with the S Pen compared with on the Note S Note gets some notable improvements as well, and the veil of inhospitable-ness that greeted me in the first version of the app has thankfully largely dissipated.

The app now includes a brief text tutorial to make jumping in a bit less confusing, and the interface has been tweaked slightly — you can now easily load a completely blank sheet of “paper” — toward the same purpose.

Icons now present their functionality much more clearly when tapping them and can be further clarified by the new AirView feature, which lets users hover the point of the S Pen over a menu option, which in turn displays a text bubble of each option’s functionality.

Typing in a Web site URL, composing an e-mail, searching for an app in Google Play, or doing pretty much any action that would normally cause a software keyboard to pop up at the bottom on the screen, instead triggers a notepad to appear.

And instead of pecking away at each letter with the pen, you can simply write your entry directly into the text field. However, this feature must be enabled within each app by holding down on the settings button on the software keyboard and selecting the “T” icon.

The pen-to-text translation software still misinterprets from time to time, however, and could use some better prediction software. Still, once enabled, it’s an incredibly useful feature that gives using the interface a nice flow when using the pen.

Reading mode is unique to the Note 8 and simply alters page backgrounds in e-book apps to look more like paper rather than a stark, white background. It also uses the ambient light sensor to adjust the brightness to best fit the environment you’re reading in.

While the app has been available on iOS, the Note 8 is currently the only place you’ll find it on Android. Not surprisingly, it’s fully compatible with the S Pen. It includes typical social sharing “this is what I’m watching” options and seems like a pretty effective and accurate TV guide, but the real standout feature is its powerful and potentially very useful search.

Searching for a particular piece of video content returns results sorted by delivery system. In other words, if you search for “Thor,” Watch On returns a number of matching options.

Choosing the “Thor ” movie option takes you to an information page with its Rotten Tomatoes score, sharing options, IMDb info, and related content. You then choose through which service to watch the movie, and that service’s app will launch and take you directly to the “Thor” page, where you can choose to stream, purchase, or rent the video.

Unfortunately, neither Netflix nor Hulu will be integrated in time for launch, but I’m very interested in revisiting this app once they have. Having this kind of inter-service video hub is something I’ve been hoping Peel would implement since it debuted its Smart Remote app a couple of years ago.

Hardware features The S Pen returns with its useful cache of shortcut gestures, making tasks like screen capture, calling up an app’s menu, and going back to the previous screen a simple act of holding down the pen button and swiping or tapping the screen in the appropriate way.

After using the Note 8 for a couple of days, I came to the conclusion that I’d much rather write on a tablet screen than attempt to type on one. A quick e-mail reply or entering a search query just feels much more natural to scribble than tab out.

The interpretation software isn’t perfect so making an attempt to write legibly is a must, but it was usually able parse out the vast majority of my writings. With the S Pen you can also take a screenshot of pretty much anything by holding down the button and circling whatever it is you want to capture.

A menu of apps then pops up at the bottom of the screen, and choosing one drops your screenshot into the app where you can then edit it as you see fit. It’s in thoughtful moments like these — where the interaction feels natural and intuitive — that the S Pen really earns its keep.

The Note 8 houses a 1. Performance The Note 8 houses an 8-inch screen with a 1,xpixel-resolution screen. That’s pixels-per-inch ppi compared with on the iPad Mini, and the relative difference in clarity is immediate and dramatic, especially with fonts.

Fonts on the Note 8 lack the jaggy, unpolished look they deliver on the iPad Mini. This clean arrangement was a smart move on Samsung’s part, one that should save consumers the confusion of fumbling around simply to raise or lower the speaker volume.

Speaking of which, the dual-speaker setup on the bottom edge over by the micro-USB port isn’t nearly as user-friendly. Whereas the Note Head-on, the Note 8. Thankfully, much of that front face is dominated by the 8-inch screen — the surrounding bezels are generous enough to accommodate thumbs without hampering the tablet’s overall flair.

That’s not to say it’s a perfect fit. We did have to be somewhat mindful when reading an e-book, for example, as any accidental encroachment of the thumb onto the edge of the screen can trigger a page flip.

It’s not ideal, but it’s also not unworkable. As for the S Pen, allow us to nitpick for just a moment. There’s nothing wrong, per se, with the ergonomics of Samsung’s stylus: What irks us, though, is the slight notch Samsung’s allotted for its removal, now placed on the right side of the Note 8.

Users familiar with the Note II will undoubtedly reach behind the tablet, out of sheer habit, to detach the S Pen. Thus, it forces Note diehards into a bit of retraining.

Again, it’s a very minor quibble, but we’d prefer if Samsung kept the experience consistent for its user base. It may be the Note line’s claim to fame and existence, but we can’t shake the feeling that the S Pen is now just a relic, a built-in accessory necessary to distinguish the very first Note as a new category.

A justification, even, for its then-ostentatious screen size. As we move deeper into, we now find mega-smartphone displays becoming the norm. One could even argue that Note-sized smartphones might eventually even cannibalize the need for tablets proper.

And yet, barring creative professions like graphic design, there’s no real productivity boost to be had, no efficiency gained by resorting to a stylus over the finger. We can isolate only a handful of cases where consumers may prefer the S Pen: Aside from that, though, we’re hard-pressed to care about the pen.

In fact, we’ve found it hampers our workflow when attempting to compose an email or a simple text in Google Voice — something the keyboard’s Swype-like input mode handles with ease.

When the Note On that device, the poor pixel density wasn’t just a distraction; it also detracted from the Note Repurposed on an 8-inch screen, however, that resolution becomes much more palatable, thanks to a higher ppi of Contrast that with the lesser 1, x IPS display and ppi on Apple’s 7.

When it inherited the legacy of the Note No, the Note 8. Yes, there’s some washout apparent at a degree turn, but it doesn’t really have any meaningful negative impact on the user experience.

If you aim to use the Note 8. Discerning the contents of the screen in daylight, even at full brightness, was a downright chore. Handily, there is an option for outdoor visibility buried within the camera settings, but outside of that specific software, the setting has no effect on general-purpose usage.

The Samsung effect can be dizzying. To introduce a new Galaxy product is to unleash a virtual cavalcade of software bells and whistles. For Samsung, software is the star — not the Android 4.

It’s a pattern that continues to snowball with every successive flagship device — a TouchWiz feature overload. For sure, a small subset of users familiar enough with past Galaxy flagships will be able to find and make use of the plenitude of software features.

But what about new users? Say what you will about skins, but the real terror of TouchWiz is how anti-user it becomes with every successive product generation by sheer dint of features.

It can be a tool for creative expression, a multi-tasking hub or a lean-back device for entertainment. But let’s bring it back to reality, where the US variant is but a WiFi product only.

This is a tablet made for the connected, post-PC household in dire need of an all-in-one device. Want to watch live TV without having to reach for the remote?

The app’s setup process is relatively painless, prompting users only for TV manufacturer, ZIP code and service provider to get started. Of course, consumers can opt for more tried-and-true streaming services like Netflix or Hulu Plus for their video fix — both well-suited to the device’s 8-inch real estate.

While eight inches is great for video consumption, not everyone’s going to want to saturate their brains with moving images. And for those people, Samsung’s included a special Reading Mode.

Accessible via the dropdown menu, this feature adjusts the Note 8. It’s not restricted to certain applications, either. Users can whitelist a selection of applications e. In practice, though, the effect is barely noticeable.

All software aside, perhaps the greatest innovation ushered in with the Note 8. Take a moment and let that soak in. The Note line’s greatest weakness is now gone for good — your fingers are now totally unnecessary.

It’s curious that Samsung chose the Note 8. The Note as a tablet is still somewhat unproven commercial territory — not so with the Note as a smartphone. So now we know what to look forward to on the next Note phone, and we’re that much happier for it.

Indeed, we’ve seen this setup before — you need only look to the Note II for proof of that — which means we have no complaints where its real-world performance is concerned. The UI is responsive, navigation is brisk, animations are fluid and apps launch nearly instantly.

In fact, all hums along so smoothly that it’s easy to take the Note 8. What you may have a gripe with is the longevity of the Note 8. While it did get us through the weekend on a single charge about two and half days, in all, that was largely to do with careful power management on our end — and that’s with WiFi always on and connected.

Rather than pummel it into the ground with heavy, abnormal use, we took a more practical approach to the Note 8. More than likely, this is how any prospective owner will use the tablet, so a two-day average is what you should anticipate.

Now, when it comes to standardized testing, the Note 8. Under the duress of our typical battery rundown test, which involves looping a video until the device gives out, it eked out a paltry seven hours and 18 minutes.

That’s with WiFi and Bluetooth enabled, Twitter set to sync at minute intervals, one push email account and brightness set to 50 percent. If you take a look at our chart below, you’ll see that this puts the Note 8.

Benchmarks are another matter altogether. Instead, we look to the Note 8. That ASUS-made tablet might be getting up there in age, but its mix of pricing and performance has proven to be a hot seller for Google.

9ja note tablet review galaxy samsung 8 kilos

The Note 8 ships with Android 4. I personally have never had a problem with the colorful, somewhat Fisher-Price-ian look of the interface, but if you’ve never liked its more gaudy presentation, there’s nothing new here that’ll change your mind.

Samsung’s multi-windows feature, which allows for two simultaneous apps to run on the screen, has been thankfully enhanced. A deeper pool of apps is now compatible, including Twitter, Facebook, and Chrome, and each window can be easily resized, Windows 8 style.

The feature feels more at home here on the Note 8 with the S Pen compared with on the Note S Note gets some notable improvements as well, and the veil of inhospitable-ness that greeted me in the first version of the app has thankfully largely dissipated.

The app now includes a brief text tutorial to make jumping in a bit less confusing, and the interface has been tweaked slightly — you can now easily load a completely blank sheet of “paper” — toward the same purpose.

Icons now present their functionality much more clearly when tapping them and can be further clarified by the new AirView feature, which lets users hover the point of the S Pen over a menu option, which in turn displays a text bubble of each option’s functionality.

Typing in a Web site URL, composing an e-mail, searching for an app in Google Play, or doing pretty much any action that would normally cause a software keyboard to pop up at the bottom on the screen, instead triggers a notepad to appear.

And instead of pecking away at each letter with the pen, you can simply write your entry directly into the text field. However, this feature must be enabled within each app by holding down on the settings button on the software keyboard and selecting the “T” icon.

The pen-to-text translation software still misinterprets from time to time, however, and could use some better prediction software. Still, once enabled, it’s an incredibly useful feature that gives using the interface a nice flow when using the pen.

Reading mode is unique to the Note 8 and simply alters page backgrounds in e-book apps to look more like paper rather than a stark, white background. It also uses the ambient light sensor to adjust the brightness to best fit the environment you’re reading in.

While the app has been available on iOS, the Note 8 is currently the only place you’ll find it on Android. Not surprisingly, it’s fully compatible with the S Pen. It includes typical social sharing “this is what I’m watching” options and seems like a pretty effective and accurate TV guide, but the real standout feature is its powerful and potentially very useful search.

Searching for a particular piece of video content returns results sorted by delivery system. In other words, if you search for “Thor,” Watch On returns a number of matching options. Choosing the “Thor ” movie option takes you to an information page with its Rotten Tomatoes score, sharing options, IMDb info, and related content.

You then choose through which service to watch the movie, and that service’s app will launch and take you directly to the “Thor” page, where you can choose to stream, purchase, or rent the video.

Unfortunately, neither Netflix nor Hulu will be integrated in time for launch, but I’m very interested in revisiting this app once they have. Having this kind of inter-service video hub is something I’ve been hoping Peel would implement since it debuted its Smart Remote app a couple of years ago.

Hardware features The S Pen returns with its useful cache of shortcut gestures, making tasks like screen capture, calling up an app’s menu, and going back to the previous screen a simple act of holding down the pen button and swiping or tapping the screen in the appropriate way.

After using the Note 8 for a couple of days, I came to the conclusion that I’d much rather write on a tablet screen than attempt to type on one. A quick e-mail reply or entering a search query just feels much more natural to scribble than tab out.

The interpretation software isn’t perfect so making an attempt to write legibly is a must, but it was usually able parse out the vast majority of my writings.

With the S Pen you can also take a screenshot of pretty much anything by holding down the button and circling whatever it is you want to capture. A menu of apps then pops up at the bottom of the screen, and choosing one drops your screenshot into the app where you can then edit it as you see fit.

It’s in thoughtful moments like these — where the interaction feels natural and intuitive — that the S Pen really earns its keep. The Note 8 houses a 1. Performance The Note 8 houses an 8-inch screen with a 1,xpixel-resolution screen.

That’s pixels-per-inch ppi compared with on the iPad Mini, and the relative difference in clarity is immediate and dramatic, especially with fonts. Fonts on the Note 8 lack the jaggy, unpolished look they deliver on the iPad Mini.

Note 8 fonts are clear and sharp, and the screen’s sharpness is only buoyed by its extremely bright and colorful Plane Line Switching PLS panel. Three screen presets are included: Dynamic, Standard, and Movie.

Each adjusts the screen’s contrast to be more appropriate to the setting. The screen responds quickly to swipe requests and delivers page turns smoothly at 60 frames per second; however, there is a second long, but still noticeable, delay after pressing the home button as the tablet sometimes appears to stall for a split second.

Riptide GP ran at a very playable frame rate, but never came anywhere near the 60fps smoothness I look for and have only seen rarely in tablets. Just to give you an idea of the its 3D performance, here are a few 3DMark test results I conducted.

Unfortunately, 3DMark has so far yet to be released on the iOS. Once it is, I’ll update this review with iPad Mini results. Updates for the new version of Microsoft’s tablet are as subtle as they come, but the The Google Pixel C is a performance monster with a sleek design and impressively solid The Galaxy Tab S3 is an impeccably designed tablet with an impressive stylus and stunning Be respectful, keep it clean and stay on topic.

We delete comments that violate our policy, which we encourage you to read. But let’s bring it back to reality, where the US variant is but a WiFi product only. This is a tablet made for the connected, post-PC household in dire need of an all-in-one device.

Want to watch live TV without having to reach for the remote? The app’s setup process is relatively painless, prompting users only for TV manufacturer, ZIP code and service provider to get started.

Of course, consumers can opt for more tried-and-true streaming services like Netflix or Hulu Plus for their video fix — both well-suited to the device’s 8-inch real estate.

While eight inches is great for video consumption, not everyone’s going to want to saturate their brains with moving images. And for those people, Samsung’s included a special Reading Mode.

Accessible via the dropdown menu, this feature adjusts the Note 8. It’s not restricted to certain applications, either. Users can whitelist a selection of applications e.

In practice, though, the effect is barely noticeable. All software aside, perhaps the greatest innovation ushered in with the Note 8. Take a moment and let that soak in. The Note line’s greatest weakness is now gone for good — your fingers are now totally unnecessary.

It’s curious that Samsung chose the Note 8. The Note as a tablet is still somewhat unproven commercial territory — not so with the Note as a smartphone. So now we know what to look forward to on the next Note phone, and we’re that much happier for it.

Indeed, we’ve seen this setup before — you need only look to the Note II for proof of that — which means we have no complaints where its real-world performance is concerned.

The UI is responsive, navigation is brisk, animations are fluid and apps launch nearly instantly. In fact, all hums along so smoothly that it’s easy to take the Note 8.

What you may have a gripe with is the longevity of the Note 8. While it did get us through the weekend on a single charge about two and half days, in all, that was largely to do with careful power management on our end — and that’s with WiFi always on and connected.

Rather than pummel it into the ground with heavy, abnormal use, we took a more practical approach to the Note 8. More than likely, this is how any prospective owner will use the tablet, so a two-day average is what you should anticipate.

Now, when it comes to standardized testing, the Note 8. Under the duress of our typical battery rundown test, which involves looping a video until the device gives out, it eked out a paltry seven hours and 18 minutes.

That’s with WiFi and Bluetooth enabled, Twitter set to sync at minute intervals, one push email account and brightness set to 50 percent. If you take a look at our chart below, you’ll see that this puts the Note 8.

Benchmarks are another matter altogether. Instead, we look to the Note 8. That ASUS-made tablet might be getting up there in age, but its mix of pricing and performance has proven to be a hot seller for Google.

We’ve resisted it as much as possible, but the people have spoken and those people use their tablets as cameras. We know because we’ve seen it in the wilds of New York City mostly around tourist sites.

We’ve even seen it at press events. So, we’ll refrain from knocking the ridiculousness of it all and just get to the point. If you ask us, that omission on Samsung’s part should clue you in as to how seriously the company takes imaging on a tablet.

The camera’s there because it has to be, not because it’s remarkable, but it ain’t half-bad either. The usual suspects are all here — scene and shooting modes, filters and toggles for ISO, exposure and white balance — but you won’t find much need for them.

The same goes for the autofocus, which you can also tap-to-adjust, though we found little need to do so. On the whole, color reproduction seems balanced with just a slight loss of finer detail evident in shots with a greater depth of field.

As you’d expect, fully zoomed-in shots yielded incredibly blurry images, but set the focus to macro and you should be pleased with extreme close-ups. Suffice to say, the Note 8.

Our p video samples appeared washed out and delivered choppy playback with a noticeably low framerate. Towards the end of our clip, you can even see how the Note 8. On the other hand, the audio quality is remarkably clear, especially given the surrounding traffic at the time of the recording.

So even if you can’t quite see the precious moment you aimed to record, you’ll definitely be able to hear it. When we think of the Note 8. Where you’ll sink your money largely depends on the ecosystem you want to buy into or have already heavily invested in.

Barring that, the specs don’t differ much from tablet to tablet; each of them offers 1, x resolution, save for the iPad mini’s 1, x screen. Just as important is the price.

That places the Note 8. Given that, Samsung must convince consumers that a dual digitizer with pen support is worth the premium. If it is indeed a stylus you’re after, though, well, you know where to go.

Given that the Note 8. And, in a way, it is. Its skinned Jelly Bean OS is devoid of any software pitfalls threatening to muck up the user experience. Certainly, its abundant suite of TouchWiz add-ons provides extra value to consumers willing to dive deep and explore the system’s nooks and crannies.

It really is an exceptional second screen for the home, subbing as a content hub for video and TV control with WatchOn, as an optimized e-reader thanks to the LCD-dimming Reading Mode and as a productivity tool bolstered by dedicated S Pen apps, Polaris Office and Awesome Note.

True, the battery life leaves something to be desired, but apart from that, the Note 8. So what’s the kicker? There isn’t one, really. But then again, that’s a comparison to relatively old, less-powerful hardware.

As we said before, the Note 8. We may not be so sweet on the S Pen anymore, but its inclusion is more of a bonus than anything else. All told, the US Note 8. In fact, it’s quite nearly the Swiss Army knife of Android tablets.

Leap Motion crafts a reference design for cheap AR headsets. Samsung Galaxy Note 8. Pros Sturdy build quality Strong performance Vibrant display Pen can now be used to tap the capacitive soft keys Not many tablets this size with pen support.

Hardware To love Samsung is to accept the company’s hallmark: Display When the Note

Samsung has also added the ability to use the S Pen with the three buttons, something that was missing on the Note 2. The Note 8’s back doesn’t appear to be reinforced with anything but plastic.

As is the case with most Samsung tablets. The 5-megapixel rear-facing camera is located directly in the top middle of the back, and although the placement feels natural when holding the camera in portrait, my fingers were constantly getting in the way of shots when holding it in landscape.

The back button as well can be a nuisance with the tablet held this way. There were several times when trying to take a picture or playing Riptide GP that I accidentally hit it.

As a result of these buttons, we get back a small percentage of screen real estate that would otherwise be occupied by the Android nav bar. I’m thankful to have this space back, but making accommodations for the physical buttons’ placement will take some getting used to.

Somewhat inverse to that, while the physical home button is a very welcome addition, its convex nature makes it difficult to press with the stylus. The S Pen of course returns with its pressure sensitivity in tow and writing with it felt a lot less cumbersome here compared with on the Though of identical length, the S Pen has a smaller radius than the Note The grooved pen button is a bit smaller than before, making it less likely to elicit accidental presses.

The tablet includes palm rejection tech; however, if the skin on the knife edge of your hand folds in just the right way, making a “point,” the tablet will, much to my frustration, mistakenly believe you’re trying to write with it and accept inputs from it.

The Note 8’s 1,x resolution screen is one of the best I’ve seen on any tablet. Writing with the Stylus while holding the tablet will take some getting used to. The front-facing camera sits off to the top-right corner on the front.

The top edge holds the headphone jack. Software features Since the release of the Note The Note 8 reaps the benefit of the company’s hindsight as it includes not only the additions we’ve seen added to the Note The performance increases in that version appear to have been dramatic.

The Note 8 ships with Android 4. I personally have never had a problem with the colorful, somewhat Fisher-Price-ian look of the interface, but if you’ve never liked its more gaudy presentation, there’s nothing new here that’ll change your mind.

Samsung’s multi-windows feature, which allows for two simultaneous apps to run on the screen, has been thankfully enhanced. A deeper pool of apps is now compatible, including Twitter, Facebook, and Chrome, and each window can be easily resized, Windows 8 style.

The feature feels more at home here on the Note 8 with the S Pen compared with on the Note S Note gets some notable improvements as well, and the veil of inhospitable-ness that greeted me in the first version of the app has thankfully largely dissipated.

The app now includes a brief text tutorial to make jumping in a bit less confusing, and the interface has been tweaked slightly — you can now easily load a completely blank sheet of “paper” — toward the same purpose.

Icons now present their functionality much more clearly when tapping them and can be further clarified by the new AirView feature, which lets users hover the point of the S Pen over a menu option, which in turn displays a text bubble of each option’s functionality.

Typing in a Web site URL, composing an e-mail, searching for an app in Google Play, or doing pretty much any action that would normally cause a software keyboard to pop up at the bottom on the screen, instead triggers a notepad to appear.

And instead of pecking away at each letter with the pen, you can simply write your entry directly into the text field. However, this feature must be enabled within each app by holding down on the settings button on the software keyboard and selecting the “T” icon.

The pen-to-text translation software still misinterprets from time to time, however, and could use some better prediction software. Still, once enabled, it’s an incredibly useful feature that gives using the interface a nice flow when using the pen.

Reading mode is unique to the Note 8 and simply alters page backgrounds in e-book apps to look more like paper rather than a stark, white background. It also uses the ambient light sensor to adjust the brightness to best fit the environment you’re reading in.

While the app has been available on iOS, the Note 8 is currently the only place you’ll find it on Android. Not surprisingly, it’s fully compatible with the S Pen. It includes typical social sharing “this is what I’m watching” options and seems like a pretty effective and accurate TV guide, but the real standout feature is its powerful and potentially very useful search.

Searching for a particular piece of video content returns results sorted by delivery system. In other words, if you search for “Thor,” Watch On returns a number of matching options. Choosing the “Thor ” movie option takes you to an information page with its Rotten Tomatoes score, sharing options, IMDb info, and related content.

You then choose through which service to watch the movie, and that service’s app will launch and take you directly to the “Thor” page, where you can choose to stream, purchase, or rent the video.

Unfortunately, neither Netflix nor Hulu will be integrated in time for launch, but I’m very interested in revisiting this app once they have. Having this kind of inter-service video hub is something I’ve been hoping Peel would implement since it debuted its Smart Remote app a couple of years ago.

Hardware features The S Pen returns with its useful cache of shortcut gestures, making tasks like screen capture, calling up an app’s menu, and going back to the previous screen a simple act of holding down the pen button and swiping or tapping the screen in the appropriate way.

After using the Note 8 for a couple of days, I came to the conclusion that I’d much rather write on a tablet screen than attempt to type on one. A quick e-mail reply or entering a search query just feels much more natural to scribble than tab out.

The interpretation software isn’t perfect so making an attempt to write legibly is a must, but it was usually able parse out the vast majority of my writings. With the S Pen you can also take a screenshot of pretty much anything by holding down the button and circling whatever it is you want to capture.

And that’s about as much ornamentation as you’ll find on the Note 8. Underneath that non-removable backplate lies the 4,mAh battery. This clean arrangement was a smart move on Samsung’s part, one that should save consumers the confusion of fumbling around simply to raise or lower the speaker volume.

Speaking of which, the dual-speaker setup on the bottom edge over by the micro-USB port isn’t nearly as user-friendly. Whereas the Note Head-on, the Note 8. Thankfully, much of that front face is dominated by the 8-inch screen — the surrounding bezels are generous enough to accommodate thumbs without hampering the tablet’s overall flair.

That’s not to say it’s a perfect fit. We did have to be somewhat mindful when reading an e-book, for example, as any accidental encroachment of the thumb onto the edge of the screen can trigger a page flip.

It’s not ideal, but it’s also not unworkable. As for the S Pen, allow us to nitpick for just a moment. There’s nothing wrong, per se, with the ergonomics of Samsung’s stylus: What irks us, though, is the slight notch Samsung’s allotted for its removal, now placed on the right side of the Note 8.

Users familiar with the Note II will undoubtedly reach behind the tablet, out of sheer habit, to detach the S Pen. Thus, it forces Note diehards into a bit of retraining.

Again, it’s a very minor quibble, but we’d prefer if Samsung kept the experience consistent for its user base. It may be the Note line’s claim to fame and existence, but we can’t shake the feeling that the S Pen is now just a relic, a built-in accessory necessary to distinguish the very first Note as a new category.

A justification, even, for its then-ostentatious screen size. As we move deeper into, we now find mega-smartphone displays becoming the norm. One could even argue that Note-sized smartphones might eventually even cannibalize the need for tablets proper.

And yet, barring creative professions like graphic design, there’s no real productivity boost to be had, no efficiency gained by resorting to a stylus over the finger.

We can isolate only a handful of cases where consumers may prefer the S Pen: Aside from that, though, we’re hard-pressed to care about the pen. In fact, we’ve found it hampers our workflow when attempting to compose an email or a simple text in Google Voice — something the keyboard’s Swype-like input mode handles with ease.

When the Note On that device, the poor pixel density wasn’t just a distraction; it also detracted from the Note Repurposed on an 8-inch screen, however, that resolution becomes much more palatable, thanks to a higher ppi of Contrast that with the lesser 1, x IPS display and ppi on Apple’s 7.

When it inherited the legacy of the Note No, the Note 8. Yes, there’s some washout apparent at a degree turn, but it doesn’t really have any meaningful negative impact on the user experience. If you aim to use the Note 8.

Discerning the contents of the screen in daylight, even at full brightness, was a downright chore. Handily, there is an option for outdoor visibility buried within the camera settings, but outside of that specific software, the setting has no effect on general-purpose usage.

The Samsung effect can be dizzying. To introduce a new Galaxy product is to unleash a virtual cavalcade of software bells and whistles. For Samsung, software is the star — not the Android 4.

It’s a pattern that continues to snowball with every successive flagship device — a TouchWiz feature overload. For sure, a small subset of users familiar enough with past Galaxy flagships will be able to find and make use of the plenitude of software features.

But what about new users? Say what you will about skins, but the real terror of TouchWiz is how anti-user it becomes with every successive product generation by sheer dint of features.

It can be a tool for creative expression, a multi-tasking hub or a lean-back device for entertainment. But let’s bring it back to reality, where the US variant is but a WiFi product only.

This is a tablet made for the connected, post-PC household in dire need of an all-in-one device. Want to watch live TV without having to reach for the remote? The app’s setup process is relatively painless, prompting users only for TV manufacturer, ZIP code and service provider to get started.

Of course, consumers can opt for more tried-and-true streaming services like Netflix or Hulu Plus for their video fix — both well-suited to the device’s 8-inch real estate.

While eight inches is great for video consumption, not everyone’s going to want to saturate their brains with moving images. And for those people, Samsung’s included a special Reading Mode.

Accessible via the dropdown menu, this feature adjusts the Note 8. It’s not restricted to certain applications, either. Users can whitelist a selection of applications e. In practice, though, the effect is barely noticeable.

All software aside, perhaps the greatest innovation ushered in with the Note 8. Take a moment and let that soak in. The Note line’s greatest weakness is now gone for good — your fingers are now totally unnecessary.

It’s curious that Samsung chose the Note 8. The Note as a tablet is still somewhat unproven commercial territory — not so with the Note as a smartphone. So now we know what to look forward to on the next Note phone, and we’re that much happier for it.

Indeed, we’ve seen this setup before — you need only look to the Note II for proof of that — which means we have no complaints where its real-world performance is concerned. The UI is responsive, navigation is brisk, animations are fluid and apps launch nearly instantly.

In fact, all hums along so smoothly that it’s easy to take the Note 8. What you may have a gripe with is the longevity of the Note 8. While it did get us through the weekend on a single charge about two and half days, in all, that was largely to do with careful power management on our end — and that’s with WiFi always on and connected.

Rather than pummel it into the ground with heavy, abnormal use, we took a more practical approach to the Note 8. More than likely, this is how any prospective owner will use the tablet, so a two-day average is what you should anticipate.

Now, when it comes to standardized testing, the Note 8. Under the duress of our typical battery rundown test, which involves looping a video until the device gives out, it eked out a paltry seven hours and 18 minutes.

That’s with WiFi and Bluetooth enabled, Twitter set to sync at minute intervals, one push email account and brightness set to 50 percent. If you take a look at our chart below, you’ll see that this puts the Note 8.

Benchmarks are another matter altogether.

For windows note tablet review samsung 8 galaxy 9ja hit

Sign in to comment Be respectful, keep it clean and stay on topic. Though WatchOn is based on Peel technology, Samsung also includes a standalone Peel SmartRemote app, which provides just the TV listings without the universal search option. Motley Crue’s guitar and drum heavy “Shout at the Devil,” was so tinny that it was almost painful to listen to. However, unlike LG which has a similar feature called QSlide on its phones, Samsung doesn’t let you change the opacity of the playback window so you can see through it. When we did click through to a movie listing, we were given the choice to buy or rent it from Samsung’s Media Hub or BlockBuster On Demand. The overall score was also lowered from 7.

More than likely, this is how any prospective owner will use the tablet, so a two-day average is what you should anticipate. Samsung has also added the ability to use the S Pen with the three buttons, something that was missing on the Note 2. Like other Samsung Galaxy devices, the Galaxy Note 8. A quick e-mail reply or entering a search query just feels much more natural to scribble than tab out.

Want to watch live TV without having to reach for the remote? Yes, there’s some washout apparent at a degree turn, but it doesn’t really have any meaningful negative impact on the user experience. The Note 8 feels to be made of the same stuff as the Note

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Mes review tablet galaxy samsung 8 note sombras oscuras gratis

Purchase options and prices varied depending on title. What you may have a gripe with is the longevity of the Note 8. However, if you’re willing to pay a premium for a pen-enabled tablet, the Galaxy Note 8. While eight inches is great for video consumption, not everyone’s going to want to saturate their brains with moving images. See…

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