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Reviews on lenovo yoga 2 pro

Reviews on lenovo yoga 2 pro





Valid till 2017/5/25



Dec 05, · The Lenovo IdeaPad Yoga 2 Pro is a device in between a slate tablet and a traditional laptop. QHD+ makes it attractive, but it’s still a product for early. The Lenovo IdeaPad Yoga 2 boasts a gorgeous quad HD plus display and a lighter design for switching between notebook and tablet mode, all for a good price. Learn more about the Lenovo Yoga 2 Pro multimode Ultrabook, a powerful laptop with four different usage modes: Laptop, Tablet, Tent, and Stand.
Keys still exposed and clickable in tablet mode. For me, a computer that can’t support Chrome and at least 10 tabs is nigh unusable, at least unusable in the way I like to use a computer. There are a few little surface-level changes though, which make all the difference. ComputerShopper may earn affiliate commissions from shopping links included on this page. The most useful mode next to laptop mode would be tent mode. HP’s latest inch convertible deftly balances design, performance, features and price.
Dec 05, · The Lenovo IdeaPad Yoga 2 Pro is a device in between a slate tablet and a traditional laptop. QHD+ makes it attractive, but it’s still a product for early. The Lenovo IdeaPad Yoga 2 boasts a gorgeous quad HD plus display and a lighter design for switching between notebook and tablet mode, all for a good price. Learn more about the Lenovo Yoga 2 Pro multimode Ultrabook, a powerful laptop with four different usage modes: Laptop, Tablet, Tent, and Stand.

reviews on lenovo yoga 2 pro

reviews on lenovo yoga 2 pro

reviews on lenovo yoga 2 pro

reviews on lenovo yoga 2 pro

reviews on lenovo yoga 2 pro

reviews on lenovo yoga 2 pro

reviews on lenovo yoga 2 pro

reviews on lenovo yoga 2 pro

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We also appreciate the backlight, another feature not found on the original Yoga 13, which turns on a gentle white glow around the keys and through the characters on the key tops. The Yoga 2 Pro is slightly wedge-shaped, unlike its strictly rectangular forebear, which gives it the illusion of being smaller despite the fact that it’s really about the same size. Lenovo Yoga 3 Pro Part: Limit 5 per customer. When using the touch screen in laptop mode, we did notice some amount of bounce or wobble as we poked and swiped the screen—not terrible, but not as rock-solid as some touch laptops we’ve used.

For now, let’s start at the top. One final note before we dive in: As the saying goes, you don’t fix what isn’t broken. In addition to its unprecedented flexibility, the original Yoga’s sleek, rubberized chassis was one of the laptop’s most remarked-upon attributes.

Thinking clearly, Lenovo has changed barely a thing, aesthetically speaking. Part of the joy of reviewing this new Yoga Pro 2 was putting it in people’s hands. Everyone remarked on its nice it look and feel, thanks to a thin profile, sturdy chassis, and that grippy, rubberized surface that we mentioned, which coats the entire device.

Just like last year, the most striking and still unique aspect of the Yoga 2 Pro is the fact that you can flip the screen back degrees until it rests flat against the backside of the keyboard.

This permits four operating modes. Laptop mode is your standard degree angle, with the advantage that the Yoga 2 Pro’s flexible hinge allows you to lay the screen completely flat, which is actually quite handy for situations where you’re standing up and need access to the keyboard.

The most useful mode next to laptop mode would be tent mode. By setting the tablet on its top and bottom edges, the devices functions like a tablet in a stand. The new rubberized bevel edges earn their keep in this mode.

The old Yoga would sometimes slide a bit on slippery surfaces. It’s perfect for glancing at a recipe while cooking or setting the Yoga 2 Pro up on cluttered tablet tops. Stand mode is essentially tent mode, but with a little more sturdiness and support.

The key difference is that it has a bigger footprint, so you’ll need to clear off more of your desk before touchdown. A special hinge on the Yoga 2 allows you to fold the screen all the way back for tablet mode.

Since the hinge can hold the screen in any position along its arc, the Yoga 2 Pro can be used in two other positions: Tent mode is essentially like having a tablet on a stand, and is very useful for activities such as watching videos particularly among two or more people, giving presentations, or following along with a recipe as you cook.

Lenovo touts stand mode as ideal for video chats, taking selfies, and the like, since the screen is closer to the user than it is when in laptop mode. But we’d just as soon keep the device in laptop mode for such tasks and have access to the keyboard.

When in laptop mode, you’ll appreciate the roomy keyboard that features mostly full-size keys. The island-style keys have plenty of space in between, and touch typing is very easy. As with most slim ultrabooks, the key plunge or travel is a bit shallow, but overall the keyboard is very comfortable.

We also appreciate the backlight, another feature not found on the original Yoga 13, which turns on a gentle white glow around the keys and through the characters on the key tops.

Even better, Lenovo has reversed the actions assigned to the function-key row, giving you dedicated keys for volume, mute, screen brightness, airplane mode, and other controls.

On the off chance you do need the F2 key, that’s when you press Fn-F2. The touch pad below the keyboard is relatively roomy for a small laptop, as well as responsive and friction-free. Oddly, though, it’s placed off center to the right relative to the spacebar, so when your fingers are in the home position F and J for typing, your left thumb falls on the edge of the pad.

That wouldn’t be a big problem except that the pad is gesture-enabled and supports swipe-in from the left and right to invoke actions, such as toggling between the traditional Windows desktop and Windows 8’s tile interface.

We would occasionally inadvertently invoke a left swipe-in action, until we took care to mind our thumb. The standout feature of the Yoga 2 Pro, beyond its convertible nature, is its high-definition screen.

And we mean high-definition: This is a serious amount of pixels to pack onto a Add in plenty of brightness, excellent contrast, and a wide viewing angle from all directions, and you have one spectacular portable video player.

Set it up in tent mode on the airplane tray table and watch your seatmates try to keep their eyes off it. But we found the digitizer for the screen to be surprisingly accurate: Even with our pudgy fingers it usually interpreted our intended action correctly.

When using the touch screen in laptop mode, we did notice some amount of bounce or wobble as we poked and swiped the screen—not terrible, but not as rock-solid as some touch laptops we’ve used.

Other than that, the touch screen is as good as they come. It supports up to 10 input points at a time not that we can think of any uses for that beyond a finger-painting app and it was responsive to our touches and swipes first time, every time.

Also in the plus column, the audio quality of the Yoga 2 Pro’s sound system is surprisingly good. The speakers are mounted along the spine, so sound does not get muffled no matter what position the machine is in.

There’s enough volume to fill a small room—and more than enough to share the device around a table—and the sound does not exhibit clipping or distortion even at max volume.

Movie dialogue is as clear as a bell, and we were even surprised at how good music playback sounded: None of the tinny, strident playback we’re used to from slender ultrabooks, and there’s a good amount of bass presence and a relatively wide sound stage.

The audio quality from the Yoga Pro 2 is clearly better than any tablet, may be the best we’ve heard from an ultrabook, and beats that of most larger laptops, as well.

Unfortunately, Lenovo has gone back to the bargain parts bin for the Yoga 2 Pro’s Webcam. While the p resolution billed in the literature seems good, that translates to 1,x pixels—essentially a 1-megapixel camera.

That’s unacceptable for a latest-generation mobile device of any kind, let alone one with a quad-HD screen. Stills and video shot with the onboard camera look downright blurry. Maybe video chats will look fine on Grandma’s inch CRT monitor on the other end.

Our test unit came with 4GB of RAM and a GB solid-state drive, and while we won’t complain about the latter’s speed or crash-proof nature, we suspect many users will soon wish for more storage space.

Other hardware features rounding out our model are Lenovo offers a range of optional accessories, most notably an external optical drive. One nice touch to help buyers get accustomed to the convertible is Yoga Picks, software that recommends appropriate apps for laptop, tent, tablet, and stand modes.

When you switch from one mode to another, a prompt appears for Yoga Picks yes, you can turn off the prompt after you’ve grown accustomed to the machine. Tapping on it brings you to a screen with choices best suited for the current mode, such as the online recipe collection Yoga Chef for tent mode.

Yoga Chef and the Webcam controller Yoga Camera Man also show off the device’s Smart Voice feature, which lets you control certain functions in supported apps with your voice. You can move between steps in a Yoga Chef recipe by saying “next” or “previous,” and take snapshots from afar in Camera Man by saying—wait for it—”three, two, one, cheese.

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The right edge has a powered USB 2. When the Yoga 2 Pro is closed or set open like a laptop, there’s no telling it’s a convertible. The only hints that there’s something more going on are the exposed hinges on the spine.

Those hinges allow the lid to sweep through a full degree circle, until the top of the lid meets the bottom of the chassis, with the screen facing up and keyboard facing down. That feat of flexibility turns the laptop into a tablet, and the machine’s rubberized paint gives a sure grip.

One gripe unchanged from the first Yoga: In tablet mode, the keyboard is exposed on the underside, so your fingers will be pressing keys as you handle the tablet. The machine is smart enough to disable the keyboard and touch pad when pivoted past degrees, but it’s still disconcerting.

Also, the unit’s weight soon becomes noticeable. You’ll certainly need to prop it on a crooked leg or pillow for long stretches. But wait, there’s more: Since the hinge can hold the screen in any position along its arc, the Yoga 2 Pro can be used in two other positions: Tent mode is essentially like having a tablet on a stand, and is very useful for activities such as watching videos particularly among two or more people, giving presentations, or following along with a recipe as you cook.

Lenovo touts stand mode as ideal for video chats, taking selfies, and the like, since the screen is closer to the user than it is when in laptop mode. But we’d just as soon keep the device in laptop mode for such tasks and have access to the keyboard.

When in laptop mode, you’ll appreciate the roomy keyboard that features mostly full-size keys. The island-style keys have plenty of space in between, and touch typing is very easy. As with most slim ultrabooks, the key plunge or travel is a bit shallow, but overall the keyboard is very comfortable.

We also appreciate the backlight, another feature not found on the original Yoga 13, which turns on a gentle white glow around the keys and through the characters on the key tops.

Even better, Lenovo has reversed the actions assigned to the function-key row, giving you dedicated keys for volume, mute, screen brightness, airplane mode, and other controls.

On the off chance you do need the F2 key, that’s when you press Fn-F2. The touch pad below the keyboard is relatively roomy for a small laptop, as well as responsive and friction-free.

Oddly, though, it’s placed off center to the right relative to the spacebar, so when your fingers are in the home position F and J for typing, your left thumb falls on the edge of the pad.

That wouldn’t be a big problem except that the pad is gesture-enabled and supports swipe-in from the left and right to invoke actions, such as toggling between the traditional Windows desktop and Windows 8’s tile interface.

We would occasionally inadvertently invoke a left swipe-in action, until we took care to mind our thumb. The standout feature of the Yoga 2 Pro, beyond its convertible nature, is its high-definition screen.

And we mean high-definition: This is a serious amount of pixels to pack onto a Add in plenty of brightness, excellent contrast, and a wide viewing angle from all directions, and you have one spectacular portable video player.

Set it up in tent mode on the airplane tray table and watch your seatmates try to keep their eyes off it. But we found the digitizer for the screen to be surprisingly accurate: Even with our pudgy fingers it usually interpreted our intended action correctly.

When using the touch screen in laptop mode, we did notice some amount of bounce or wobble as we poked and swiped the screen—not terrible, but not as rock-solid as some touch laptops we’ve used.

Other than that, the touch screen is as good as they come. It supports up to 10 input points at a time not that we can think of any uses for that beyond a finger-painting app and it was responsive to our touches and swipes first time, every time.

Also in the plus column, the audio quality of the Yoga 2 Pro’s sound system is surprisingly good. The speakers are mounted along the spine, so sound does not get muffled no matter what position the machine is in.

There’s enough volume to fill a small room—and more than enough to share the device around a table—and the sound does not exhibit clipping or distortion even at max volume.

Movie dialogue is as clear as a bell, and we were even surprised at how good music playback sounded: None of the tinny, strident playback we’re used to from slender ultrabooks, and there’s a good amount of bass presence and a relatively wide sound stage.

The audio quality from the Yoga Pro 2 is clearly better than any tablet, may be the best we’ve heard from an ultrabook, and beats that of most larger laptops, as well. Unfortunately, Lenovo has gone back to the bargain parts bin for the Yoga 2 Pro’s Webcam.

While the p resolution billed in the literature seems good, that translates to 1,x pixels—essentially a 1-megapixel camera. Lenovo will contact you and cancel your order if the product becomes unavailable or if there was a pricing or typographic error.

Products advertised may be subject to limited availability, depending on inventory levels and demand. Lenovo strives to provide a reasonable quantity of products to accommodate estimated consumer demand.

Lenovo makes no representation or warranty regarding third-party products or services. Other company, product or service names may be trademarks or service marks of others.

For a copy of applicable warranties, write to: Lenovo makes no representation or warranty regarding third party products or services. The Lenovo Limited Warranty applies only to Lenovo hardware products purchased for your own use, and does not transfer upon resale.

These systems do not support batteries that are not genuine Lenovo-made or authorized. Systems will continue to boot, but may not charge unauthorized batteries.

Lenovo has no responsibility for the performance or safety of unauthorized batteries, and provides no warranties for failures or damage arising out of their use.

Battery life and recharge times will vary based on many factors, including system settings and usage. Does not include tax, shipping and handling, or recycling fees. Reseller prices may vary.

Savings referenced off regular Lenovo web prices. Windows 10 Upgrade from Microsoft: Offer is available for qualified Windows 7 and Windows 8. This upgrade is being offered by Microsoft.

The Lenovo IdeaPad Yoga 2 Pro hybrid ultrabook addresses some of the shortcomings of the previous iteration. But it is still a bit too heavy to replace both a clamshell notebook and a slate tablet.

Its screen swings around so you can use the system from a variety of positions, some of which might be better for touch gaming, or for viewing videos. It’s a hybrid ultrabook that mostly acts like a clamshell notebook, but can be reconfigured to work like a slate tablet while you hold it in your arms or on a flat surface.

Our review unit has a bright silver top and bottom lid and black colored keyboard deck, screen bezel, and side edges. It looks a little like a reverse Oreo on the sideways view, but on the whole it works.

The black keys on the keyboard have white lettering and are backlit for use in darkened rooms. The keyboard is extremely comfortable to use, with a very slight bowing on the bottom of each key for comfort.

There’s a touch-sensitive Windows key on the bottom of the screen, which is always active and helps navigation in all modes, particularly Stand, Tent, and Tablet modes.

About the only quirk that remains is that the keyboard is still exposed, and keys can still be manipulated but not register when the system is in Tablet Mode. The Yoga 2 Pro is lighter than the first-generation Yoga 13, but it’s still fairly heavy and bulky.

The system measures about 0. This is still way too heavy to use in Tablet mode full time unless it is resting on a surface. Detachable or smaller systems are really the way to get ultra-mobile.

What do these extra pixels get you? When using photo-editing programs like Adobe Photoshop CS6, the extra resolution lets you see more detail without zooming in to the photo.

It also means that you can view “4K” online videos closer to native resolution up to 4, by 3,, but quoted 4K resolutions vary. It just is, and helps that part of the machine fade away to the back of your mind like it should.

Every one of the Yoga’s contortion modes is also alive and well and improved. Though the hinge on the original Yoga was no slouch, the one on the Pro 2 is rock solid. When you’re poking at the touchscreen, there’s a little bit of wobble, but just as much as you’d expect from any laptop that can’t bend over backwards.

But the strength of that hinge really makes itself evident between modes, where the Pro 2 will actually hold admirable in whatever weird configuration you could desire. Personally, I’m a big fan of the degree mode, propped up on my thighs while I’m lounging in bed, with the keyboard extending straight out from the bottom like some insane keyboard tablet.

It’s not an officially supported mode, but it works great. And that’s the Yoga 2 Pro’s greatest strength; it’s a laptop that happily shape-shifts to support your particular, weird use cases instead of one that tries to form you to it like the Surface Pro 2 has a tendency to do.

Using the Yoga 2 Pro in pure tablet mode is still a little unwieldy for the same reasons it was last time around. A inch screen is just too large to be a tablet in the modern sense; it’s a slate.

Which is all well and good in its own way, but it takes getting used to. Likewise the keys are still there on the back for errant pressing. They don’t do anything, but it still makes for weird gripping.

The Thinkpad Yoga’s retractable keys were a clever solution, but they’re missing here, in the name of thinness. And all told, it’s a fair trade-off. As for guts, the Yoga 2 Pro is a damn fine laptop.

Intel’s Haswell processor brings all its power to bear on this thing, which means you’ve got better integrated graphics than last time around, and better battery power on standby thanks to a whole slew of smart sleep-states.

But even with the power-up, the Yoga Pro 2’s battery isn’t quite great. We were only able to get just over 6 hours of life during a standard Nyan cat video test at 70 percent brightness, and while that’s not a total joke or anything, it’s certainly not fantastic.

That’s roughly half of what you can get out of a Haswell-sporting MacBook Air, and at least an hour shy of most other Windows 8 ultrabooks. On standby, things are a little better.

Lenovo says the Yoga Pro 2 can get 9 hours, and we found that to be roughly accurate. Again, it’s not horrible for a laptop, but it’s also not great. And it is horrible for a tablet, even though if that’s your primary use case you should be spending your money elsewhere.

Of course you get something in exchange for that lackluster battery life: At x the display on this thing is incredible, borderline ludicrous. You’re going to be hard-pressed to find something that actually takes full advantage of all those pixels, at least for the time being.

That said, Windows 8. The Yoga 2 Pro comes out of the box with its scaling option set to percent, which you’re going to need in order for text to not be super duper small. But there are a few issues that just seem unavoidable.

Specifically, some desktop applications just aren’t set up to handle resolutions of that size, the most obnoxious of which is Chrome. The browser just refuses to take full advantage of tab real-estate at a resolution this high, which means you’ve got an absurdly low multitasking limit.

The most useful mode next to laptop mode would be tent mode. By setting the tablet on its top and bottom edges, the devices functions like a tablet in a stand.

The new rubberized bevel edges earn their keep in this mode. The old Yoga would sometimes slide a bit on slippery surfaces. It’s perfect for glancing at a recipe while cooking or setting the Yoga 2 Pro up on cluttered tablet tops.

Stand mode is essentially tent mode, but with a little more sturdiness and support. The key difference is that it has a bigger footprint, so you’ll need to clear off more of your desk before touchdown.

A special hinge on the Yoga 2 allows you to fold the screen all the way back for tablet mode. Unfortunately, just like the original Yoga, the inch Yoga 2 Pro is a little too large to use comfortably in tablet mode.

Also a repeat of the original: This said, the notion of playing full-fledged, touch-optimized PC games like Civilization V in this mode is fairly joyous, even if the device is too heavy to hold in your hands.

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The keyboard is extremely comfortable to use, with a very slight bowing on the bottom of each key for comfort. Stills and video shot with the onboard camera look downright blurry. But even with the power-up, the Yoga Pro 2’s battery isn’t quite great. Lenovo has no responsibility for the performance or safety of unauthorized batteries, and provides no warranties for failures or damage arising out of their use. Specifications Key Specs Processor: Our review unit has a bright silver top and bottom lid and black colored keyboard deck, screen bezel, and side edges.

Yoga line needed a refresh to keep that fantastic form factor fresh enough to recommend. Joel is proof that you can escape the retail grind: That’s roughly half of what you can get out of a Haswell-sporting MacBook Air, and at least an hour shy of most other Windows 8 ultrabooks. Which is why a device that can be both a tablet and a laptop and do both admirably is still the elusive epitome of Windows 8 machines.

Detachable or smaller systems are really the way to get ultra-mobile. The Yoga 2 Pro is innovative because of its flexible usage scenarios, but its overall weight and bulkiness keeps it from getting our highest recommendation. And that’s the Yoga 2 Pro’s greatest strength; it’s a laptop that happily shape-shifts to support your particular, weird use cases instead of one that tries to form you to it like the Surface Pro 2 has a tendency to do.

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Lenovo Yoga 2 Pro Laptop This product is no longer available for purchase on lenovo. There’s a touch-sensitive Windows key on the bottom of the screen, which is always active and helps navigation in all modes, particularly Stand, Tent, and Tablet modes. When in laptop mode, you’ll appreciate the roomy keyboard that features mostly full-size keys. But it is still a bit too heavy to replace both a clamshell notebook and a slate tablet. See…

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