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How to climb a telephone pole

How to climb a telephone pole





Valid till 2017/5/25



Find great deals on eBay for telephone pole climbing. Shop with confidence. Welcome to Page One! (Disclaimer: This presentation does not advocate, endorse, guarantee, imply nor infer any person can safely climb utility poles based solely on. Our climbing gear is designed for linemen and cable men who are required to climb wood poles. Techniques for climbing date back over a hundred years.
NEVER file the gaff hooks! Информация о количестве и суммах ставок может быть несколько устаревшей. Оптимизировать поиск для telephone pole climbing. While the hot stick is still extended, it is used to capture an eye in the lifeline, which is then retracted to the ground. Items, View Cart Checkout.
Find great deals on eBay for telephone pole climbing. Shop with confidence. Welcome to Page One! (Disclaimer: This presentation does not advocate, endorse, guarantee, imply nor infer any person can safely climb utility poles based solely on. Our climbing gear is designed for linemen and cable men who are required to climb wood poles. Techniques for climbing date back over a hundred years.

how to climb a telephone pole

how to climb a telephone pole

how to climb a telephone pole

how to climb a telephone pole

how to climb a telephone pole

how to climb a telephone pole

how to climb a telephone pole

how to climb a telephone pole

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Best viewed with and. I wish you all the best of luck. Even the instructors were on his side. Subscribe Advertise xxyqysttcdzxuaxsscstbtydxydwvr Contact Us. Энергоснабжение и коммунальные службы 4.

Safety comes first, within seconds serious injury can occur and lives can be lost. Click here to view course pricing. Separate each email with a comma. Utility Pole Climbing Certification Fill out the form below to request additional information on this class.

Click Here For More Courses. Ladder Safety and Fall Protect. In my training, the individual student was responsible for assembling their own equipment. It does not require a lot of knowledge or talent, but the hardware must be tight and the straps correctly attached.

The gaff hooks must be kept sharp and free of knicks. Usually, you will be issued a honing stone to maintain your gaff hooks. The only absolute about this is keeping the original profile of the hook.

This is a precisely manufactured shape, therefore it must be preserved. Gingerly glide the honing stone over the cutting edge of the hook and rock it with your hand. Remember, it is a honing operation, not filing.

NEVER file the gaff hooks! If you get a set of gaffs with knicks, fractures or rust – turn them back in. It is not worth the risk no matter what anyone may say.

You may be outfitted with a set of gaff guards for training. These are a set of heavy plastic guards that ride at shin level and protect your calves from being cut with either gaff. Work positioning equipment cannot be rigged so that a climber can free fall more than two feet.

This equipment, used in conjunction with fall-restrict equipment, comprises a fall restricting system. This system is how a climber crosses over and under obstructions without being disconnected from the pole.

On poles with significant obstructions where linemen need more mobility, vertical lifeline systems allow the worker to free climb without a second positioning strap. A wood pole fall arrest system works by securing a rope-positioning tube and dielectric lifeline at the top of a pole.

The worker raises the tube from the ground and drops it over a suitable anchorage point near the top of the pole using an extendable hot stick tool inserted into one end of the tube in order to manipulate it into position.

While the hot stick is still extended, it is used to capture an eye in the lifeline, which is then retracted to the ground. A carabineer is used to choke the lifeline back at the top of the pole.

A rope grab with an integrated shock absorbing lanyard is connected to the dorsal D-ring of a full body harness and lifeline, allowing the climber to move safely into position around virtually any obstruction.

This fall arrest system provides easy, fast climbing without requiring connections, disconnections and adjustments each time a lineman passes an obstacle on the pole.

Using proper techniques and fall protection equipment to ascend and descend wood utility poles can help promote a culture of safety while also making sure linemen are working efficiently and effectively.

The utilities industry presents workers with many unique challenges, but with the right fall protection solutions, linemen won’t have to knock on wood every time they scale a pole. For more information, visit www.

Subscribe to Utility Products or email newsletter today at no cost and receive the latest news and information.

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After I completed the initial training, I was offered another job that was more to my liking and I quit the phone company. I can say, however, I logged one entire day as a full-fledged telephone service installer.

This occurred when I reported to the phone company yard and met my supervisor and spent that day riding along with a veteran installer. I am relating this bit of background because I feel some sense of obligation to this particular telephone service provider.

They spent a lot of money on my training and the accommodations were quite agreeable. It may seem odd to you, but I want to convey the following information as a public service – and perhaps someone else can gain from my experience.

It may also prevent someone from choosing this field of endeavor and then realizing it is not for them. This is what occurred in my case. In fairness to myself, I think the phone company should have done a better task of screening prospective applicants and their fitting into that kind of workplace culture.

But that is another matter entirely. Now, on to the subject. The first prerequisite to pole climbing is procuring a good pair of pole climbing boots. The only absolutes about the boots are: You may be hearing about different brands of boots and the so-called preferred brand of linemen, but any decent boot that is at least ankle height will work satisfactorily.

I suggest going to a military surplus store and checking into their line of NEW boots. Do not buy a pair of army boots, jump boots, jungle boots, boon dockers or other standard footwear used by the armed forces or metropolitan police departments; and definitely do not buy a used pair.

When you are shopping around, you may hear that a full-steel shank boot is preferred, but the standard half-shank is really more than adequate. The idea behind the steel shank is to provide a larger area for your body weight to rest on.

Without the shank, all your body weight is concentrated on two one-inch wide gaff hooks, and that translates into massive pain on the soles of the feet. After you buy a decent pair, wear them as long as you can prior to the actual training.

The boot leather is thicker and tougher than the leather on a pair of tennis shoes. Now that this basic rule is fully understood, the more refined aspects of the pole climbing technique can be presented.

After you have been issued your pole climbing gear, check that everything is correctly assembled. In my training, the individual student was responsible for assembling their own equipment.

It does not require a lot of knowledge or talent, but the hardware must be tight and the straps correctly attached. The gaff hooks must be kept sharp and free of knicks. Usually, you will be issued a honing stone to maintain your gaff hooks.

The only absolute about this is keeping the original profile of the hook. This is a precisely manufactured shape, therefore it must be preserved. Gingerly glide the honing stone over the cutting edge of the hook and rock it with your hand.

Remember, it is a honing operation, not filing. NEVER file the gaff hooks! If you get a set of gaffs with knicks, fractures or rust – turn them back in.

It is not worth the risk no matter what anyone may say. You may be outfitted with a set of gaff guards for training. These are a set of heavy plastic guards that ride at shin level and protect your calves from being cut with either gaff.

The gaff guards are mounted to the gaff hook frames with wire tyes. Generally, gaff guards are not used in the field, but are a very good idea in training. Some instructors may even leave the wire tye ends sticking out to serve as “curb feelers” while negotiating the pole.

So, now you don your gear. If it is brand-new equipment, the rubber-impregnated, heavy-weave straps are going to be stiff and require some time to work in. Keep track of the number of eyelet holes past the buckles each time you put the gaff hooks on.

Electrical wires and cables are routed overhead on utility poles as an inexpensive way to keep them insulated from the ground and out of the way of people and vehicles.

Utility poles can be made of wood, metal, concrete, or composites like fiberglass. They are used for two different types of power lines; subtransmission lines which carry higher voltage power between substations, and distribution lines which distribute lower voltage power to customers.

The first poles were used in by the telegraph inventor Sir Francis Ronalds who set up eight miles of overhead cable in Hammersmith. Utility poles were first used in the midth century in America with telegraph systems, starting with Samuel Morse who attempted to bury a line between Baltimore and Washington, D.

Today, underground distribution lines are increasingly used as an alternative to utility poles in residential neighborhoods, due to poles’ perceived ugliness. Utility poles are commonly used to carry two types of electric power lines: Distribution lines carry power from local substations to customers.

They generally carry voltages from 4. A service drop carries this lower voltage to the customer’s premises. Subtransmission lines carry higher voltage power from regional substations to local substations.

They usually carry 46 kV, 69 kV, or kV for distances up to 60 miles. Transmission lines carrying voltages of above kV are usually not supported by poles, but by metal pylons known as transmission towers in the US.

For economic or practical reasons, such as to save space in urban areas, a distribution line is often carried on the same poles as a subtransmission line but mounted under the higher voltage lines; a practice called “underbuild”.

Telecommunication cables are usually carried on the same poles that support power lines; poles shared in this fashion are known as joint-use poles, but may have their own dedicated poles. Joint-use poles are usually owned by one utility, which leases space on it for other cables.

Most utility poles are made of wood, pressure-treated with some type of preservative for protection against rot, fungi and insects. Southern yellow pine is the most widely used species in the United States; however, many species of long straight trees are used to make utility poles, including Douglas fir, jack pine, lodgepole pine, western red cedar, and Pacific silver fir.

Traditionally, the preservative used was creosote, but due to environmental concerns, alternatives such as pentachlorophenol, copper naphthenate and borates are becoming widespread in the United States.

Despite the preservatives, wood poles decay and have a life of approximately 25 to 50 years depending on climate and soil conditions, therefore requiring regular inspection and remedial preservative treatments.

Other common utility pole materials are steel and concrete, with composites such as fibreglass also becoming more prevalent. One particular patented utility pole variant used in Australia is the Stobie pole, made up of two vertical steel posts with a slab of concrete between them.

In southern Switzerland along various lakes, telephone poles are made of granite. Starting in the early s, these foot 5 m poles were originally used for telegraph wires and later for telephone wires.

Because they are made of granite, the poles last indefinitely. On poles carrying both, the electric power distribution lines and associated equipment are mounted at the top of the pole above the communication cables, for safety.

The vertical space on the pole reserved for this equipment is called the supply space. Power is transmitted using the three-phase system, with three wires, or phases, labeled “A”, “B”, and “C”.

Subtransmission lines comprise only these 3 wires, plus sometimes an overhead ground wire OGW, also called a “static line” or a “neutral”, suspended above them.

The OGW acts like a lightning rod, providing a low resistance path to ground thus protecting the phase conductors from lightning. A delta system requires only a conductor for each of the three phases.

A grounded-wye system requires a fourth conductor, the neutral, whose source is the center of the “Y” and is grounded. However, “spur lines” branching off the main line to provide power to side streets often carry only one or two phase wires, plus the neutral.

A wide range of standard distribution voltages are used, from 2, V to 34, V. On poles near a service drop, there is a pole-mounted step-down transformer to provide the required mains voltage.

In Europe and most other countries, V three phase Y service drops are used. The transformer’s primary is connected to the distribution line through protective devices called fuse cutouts.

In the event of an overload, the fuse melts and the device pivots open to provide a visual indication of the problem. They can also be opened manually by linemen using a long insulated rod called a hot stick to disconnect the transformer from the line.

The pole may be grounded with a heavy bare copper or copper-clad steel wire running down the pole, attached to the metal pin supporting each insulator, and at the bottom connected to a metal rod driven into the ground.

Some countries ground every pole while others only ground every fifth pole and any pole with a transformer on it. This provides a path for leakage currents across the surface of the insulators to get to ground, preventing the current from flowing through the wooden pole which could cause a fire or shock hazard.

A surge arrester also called a lightning arrester may also be installed between the line ahead of the cutout and the ground wire for lightning protection. The purpose of the device is to conduct extremely high voltages present on the line directly to ground.

If uninsulated conductors touch due to wind or fallen trees, the resultant sparks can start wildfires. To reduce this problem, aerial bundled conductors are being introduced.

The communications cables are attached below the electric power lines, in a vertical space along the pole designated the communications space. The most common communication cables found on utility poles are copper or fibre optic cable FOC for telephone lines and coaxial cable for cable television CATV.

Coaxial or optical fibre cables linking computer networks are also increasingly found on poles in urban areas. The cable linking the telephone exchange to local customers is a thick cable lashed to a thin supporting cable, containing hundreds of twisted pair subscriber lines.

Each twisted pair line provides a single telephone circuit or local loop to a customer. There may also be fibre optic cables interconnecting telephone exchanges. Like electrical distribution lines, communication cables connect to service drops when used to provide local service to customers.

Modern fall restrict equipment offers advantages such as interchangeable straps for different size poles. New lightweight designs make climbing easier, and advancements in equipment adjustment makes using the fall restrict easier than ever before.

Most experts consider the use of fall restrict equipment as the standard safe work practice for pole climbing in North America. Work positioning lanyards are used to secure a worker over an obstruction so the worker can remain at a work location with both hands free.

Work positioning equipment cannot be rigged so that a climber can free fall more than two feet. This equipment, used in conjunction with fall-restrict equipment, comprises a fall restricting system.

This system is how a climber crosses over and under obstructions without being disconnected from the pole. On poles with significant obstructions where linemen need more mobility, vertical lifeline systems allow the worker to free climb without a second positioning strap.

A wood pole fall arrest system works by securing a rope-positioning tube and dielectric lifeline at the top of a pole. The worker raises the tube from the ground and drops it over a suitable anchorage point near the top of the pole using an extendable hot stick tool inserted into one end of the tube in order to manipulate it into position.

While the hot stick is still extended, it is used to capture an eye in the lifeline, which is then retracted to the ground. A carabineer is used to choke the lifeline back at the top of the pole.

A rope grab with an integrated shock absorbing lanyard is connected to the dorsal D-ring of a full body harness and lifeline, allowing the climber to move safely into position around virtually any obstruction.

This fall arrest system provides easy, fast climbing without requiring connections, disconnections and adjustments each time a lineman passes an obstacle on the pole. This course also covers and describes the safe use of the popular BuckSqueeze Safety Strap, and other fall arrest systems.

A field performance report will be made on each attendee as well as a final written and performance test. The FPR will be signed by the instructor and the attendee.

Attendees not performing to the basic standards will be given an incomplete. Any attendee that violates the safety rules established by the instructor will be kept on the ground and not allowed to continue the course.

Safety comes first, within seconds serious injury can occur and lives can be lost.

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Today, underground distribution lines are increasingly used as an alternative to utility poles in residential neighborhoods, due to poles’ perceived ugliness. Some instructors may even leave the wire tye ends sticking out to serve as “curb feelers” while negotiating the pole. Never walk any distance with unprotected gaffs. Utility poles are commonly used to carry two types of electric power lines: Крепления и соединители для строительных работ 1. The date on the pole is applied by the manufacturer and refers to the date the pole was “preserved” treated to withstand the elements.

Utility poles may also carry other equipment such as street lights, supports for traffic lights and overhead electric trolley wires, and cellular network antennas. He was in his fifties, was rather fat and had been having a lot of difficulty in class. In class we were required to climb without the aid of the belt. The pole brand is sometimes an aluminum tag nailed in place.

They usually carry 46 kV, 69 kV, or kV for distances up to 60 miles. Не выбрано Применен фильтр. The primary purpose of pole attachment hardware is to secure the cable and associated aerial plant facilities to poles and to help facilitate necessary plant rearrangements.

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Climb pole a to how telephone wire condenser

If it is brand-new equipment, the rubber-impregnated, heavy-weave straps are going to be stiff and require some time to work in. Retrieved October 13, After you have been issued your pole climbing gear, check that everything is correctly assembled. Предметы для коллекций 4. See…

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