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Best waterproof case for ipad air

Best waterproof case for ipad air





Valid till 2017/5/25



Cons: Some users prefer stick-on screen protectors to built-in ones; While it looks rugged, it lacks the specs to be a military grade case; Does not waterproof the iPad. We’ve spent hundreds of hours over the past few years testing hundreds of iPhone and iPad accessories to find the best ones for you. 10+ items · Shop for waterproof samsung galaxy s7 case at Best Buy. Find low everyday prices and buy online for delivery or in-store pick-up.
For mounting an Apple TV, Velcro works great. Notify me of new comments via email. This is the tiniest mount we found that holds any size phone comfortably. Perhaps newbie question, but Im not seeing your review of Apple Watch charging stand? The great thing is that you can quickly remove it, to lighten up the iPad. Thanks for the response and the info.
Cons: Some users prefer stick-on screen protectors to built-in ones; While it looks rugged, it lacks the specs to be a military grade case; Does not waterproof the iPad. We’ve spent hundreds of hours over the past few years testing hundreds of iPhone and iPad accessories to find the best ones for you. 10+ items · Shop for waterproof samsung galaxy s7 case at Best Buy. Find low everyday prices and buy online for delivery or in-store pick-up.

best waterproof case for ipad air

best waterproof case for ipad air

best waterproof case for ipad air

best waterproof case for ipad air

best waterproof case for ipad air

best waterproof case for ipad air

best waterproof case for ipad air

best waterproof case for ipad air

Air case for ipad best waterproof for android

Do you need a battery for your home charger? BlueAnt Ribbon Best Bluetooth headphone adapter The Ribbon adds wireless connectivity to your favorite headphones, sounds almost as good as a wired connection, and costs a lot less than buying new headphones. Plantronics Voyager Edge Best Bluetooth headset The best sound quality, along with good battery life and a comfortable fit. Love the adonit pens and the elevation labs watch stand, have you guys checked out http: It comes in two parts, a silicon layer for the inside and a plastic clip-on exterior. This gives some users more peace of mind, since you can feel the screen protector on the front of the case. The cable was included.

This protector is as scratch resistant as any other, easy to install, and very affordable. In fact, after testing eight models, we found the least expensive option to be the best: We saw no issues with clarity or brightness, and we quickly got used to the protector being on the phone.

Compared with many similar options, it gets the most small things right. Khomo Dual for 9. We tested 18 cases for the iPad Pro using the same criteria we used for other iPad case models, ultimately finding two designs we liked.

Consisting of a hard-plastic back and a flexible, polyurethane screen cover, it fits well, offers all-over protection, remains easy to remove if necessary, and has a sturdy cover that stays in place but also holds its shape when you flip it around as a stand.

Moko Ultra Slim for This is the same case but for the A good case for an iPad is just as important as one for an iPhone—maybe even more so for the functionality such a case can provide.

We reached this conclusion after spending 20 hours of research narrowing down the hundreds of available iPad cases using criteria such as corner and edge protection, button coverage, a front cover, and stand functionality, and ultimately testing 20 models.

The Smart Case is the lightest case we looked at, and we found that the iPad is easier to hold in a Smart Case than in heavier cases. You can fold the screen cover into a triangular stand that provides two comfortable though nonadjustable angles: The shell is lined with microfiber except for the area corresponding to the radio antenna on cellular-enabled iPads; the interior of the case is smooth there.

Installation is as easy as it gets, with the iPad popping into the case with relatively little force. The Omni offers most of the same features as the Smart Case with the exception of button coverage.

This is the smaller version of an iPad Pro case we like. Good cases for the iPad mini 1, 2, and 3 are getting more difficult to find: Like overbuilt Ziplocs that keep your gadgets dry on the cheap.

In these situations, a simple waterproof gadget pouch is enough. The company sells more than a dozen versions, from 3 by 6 inches nice for an iPhone 6, 6s, or 7 all the way up to 12 by 50!

Inexpensive, well-built cable lets you charge Apple devices at the fastest speeds. Every device that needs a Lightning-to-USB cable for syncing and charging comes with one. We measured the charging speed of almost 50 cables and then sent the top 11 to former NASA electrical engineer Sam Gordon for teardown analysis.

Though you can get cheaper Lightning cables, we limited our search to those with an MFi certification. That means the manufacturer is licensed by Apple and uses official connectors that are guaranteed to work.

Even with this restriction, dozens of highly rated competitors are out there. We chose the Anker for a few reasons. The first is its aforementioned electrical capability. The second is its respectable length: Anker PowerPort 4 Multiport charger Affordable, fast, and compact, the PowerPort 4 is great for use at home or on the road.

In fact, it can simultaneously charge three full-size iPads at full speed while also charging a smartphone. We surveyed more than 1, Wirecutter readers, and they told us that they preferred chargers that plug directly into an outlet rather than using a long power cord, and this charger is the most powerful one we tested to do so.

It plugs directly into an outlet instead of using a detachable power cable, and it sports fold-up prongs that make it a bit more compact for packing and prevent the prongs from bending during travel.

Each port also allows a power draw of up to 2. With that in mind, we think the PowerPort 4 makes for the perfect pick. But if you do need a charger with more ports and more power, we have picks for that, too.

A solid case that provides the most juice for the money. Although the various iPhone 6 models have the largest batteries in Apple handsets to date, they can still run dry during days of heavy use.

We tested 25 battery cases over more than hours to find the best picks for both phone sizes. We tested each of those 25 battery cases by fully charging them and then installing a completely drained iPhone set to Airplane mode.

When the iPhone reached a percent charge—or when it stopped charging—we removed it from the case. We repeated the test a total of three times per case over the course of more than hours.

The Ultra Slim Extended Battery Case is our pick for the iPhone 6 and 6s because it provides the greatest charge percentage per dollar 2. We also appreciate its slim design and lightweight body.

The Energi Sliding Power Case is something of a different story. Capable of delivering an 83 percent charge to the gigantic iPhone 6 Plus battery just 9 percent less than the most powerful battery case we tested, this model is also notable because it has an inner case that you can separate from the charger.

And the protective case is actually pretty good—it could compete with some of the stand-alone iPhone 6 Plus cases we recommend. These packs come in many different sizes.

If you want to be able to refill a phone completely after a busy day and need something slimmer than the Bolt, get our runner-up pick, the EasyAcc mAh Ultra Slim Power Bank.

Our larger pick, the Anker PowerCore, can charge your phone every day for a week or keep a fleet of devices going for shorter stints. For more recommendations, see our full guide to USB battery packs.

Attractive, stable charge-and-sync dock even works with an iPad. A pedestal to hold your device sits in front of a taller pillar that supports the back of the phone or tablet.

You can also adjust the support pillar to match the thickness of your device or its case. Each of these sits nicely on the HiRise while charging, with no adjustment necessary. Swap that in place of the Lightning cable, and you can dock your battery-case-equipped iPhone.

The HiRise Deluxe is the most versatile and most thoughtfully designed dock you can find. Not as sturdy or versatile as the HiRise, but it includes a 3. But what if you want to use your favorite wired headphones and charge your phone at the same time?

Place your iPhone 7 or 7 Plus or any other Lightning-connector iPhone on the dock—it works with most thin cases—and you can plug your Lightning-connector charging cable and your 3. We expect to see a good number of similar items from third-party vendors over the next few months, but right now this is your best option.

If you want to watch video on your iPad without holding it in your hands, to type on an external keyboard, or to use the tablet while cooking in the kitchen, you need a stand.

Your favorite iPad case might double as a stand, but if not, you have scores of options for dedicated stands. Ideally, it will look nice, too. And for a portable stand, it also needs to be light and packable.

Inexpensive, featherweight stand is surprisingly sturdy. Although this stand weighs less than an ounce and folds flat, it offers three angles and a surprisingly sturdy design. The Foldable iDevice Stand accommodates all but the thickest iPad cases, and it also works great with an iPhone for hands-free video watching or FaceTime calls—or with a Kindle or other e-reader.

Machined from heavy-gauge steel with rubber bumpers to protect your tablet, the Compass 2 is the size of a few pens when you collapse it for travel; when you expand this model, easel-style, it offers more stability than the Kanex stand, especially with an iPad in portrait orientation.

The Compass 2 is also a lot more attractive and available in multiple colors red, black, or silver, and it offers a nifty low-angle position for on-screen typing and easier flat-on-the-desk viewing.

Bulky but rock-solid stand is surprisingly versatile. If your hands-free iPad use will be mostly in one location—say, on a desk or on the kitchen counter—you can sacrifice portability for stability.

Dozens of stands have come across my desk over the past few years, but none has impressed me enough to give up the Rest. Easier to hide away, this stand has grippy material and a weighted base for stability.

Of course, some people would prefer something a bit less conspicuous than the Rest, and the Stump Stand is happy to oblige. Molded from a single piece of silicone in a number of colors with a metal weight inside for stability, the Stump Stand measures just 4 inches across but weighs nearly 9.

It accommodates most cases up to half an inch thick, and grooves in the stand provide three viewing angles: The front of the Stump Stand even has a handy Home-button cutout. The sticky-silicone base of the stand keeps it from moving, and it works with any tablet or phone.

Each of its two ports can provide up to 2. Packed into this tiny unit is the capability to simultaneously charge two full-size tablets at full speed. In addition, it can differentiate between kinds of devices to deliver the proper charging current to each, something not every charger can do.

Of course, it can also fast-charge any two tablets, smartphones, or any other combination of USB-powered devices. In our tests, the PowerDrive 2 stood up to every device we tried, including multiple iPhones, multiple iPads, a OnePlus One, and a Samsung Galaxy S5, charging each device at its respective top rate.

Compared with the competition, the PowerDrive 2 offers the best balance of power and price, and it comes from a reputable company. And while in the past you had to decide whether a second USB-charging port was worth paying extra for, the price of the two-port PowerDrive 2 is so low that you have no reason to consider a single-port model.

If you value call quality over sound, a visor-clip speakerphone is the way to go; if you care more about music and podcast sound quality than about clear calls, choose an FM transmitter.

Because these kits connect to your phone using Bluetooth, they all work with the iPhone 7 and 7 Plus. Audio quality is as good as or better than that of any other unit we tested, plus you get track-control buttons on the main unit.

If your main use of in-car Bluetooth is phone calls, this model has the best audio and features. It offers easy pairing, clear and crisp audio, a few native voice commands, and built-in motion sensors that can detect when you leave and reenter the car—it powers down when it detects no motion, powering up and reconnecting to your phone when you get back in.

The Roadster 2 also offers the best battery life of the speakerphones we tested, with up to 20 hours of talk time and up to three weeks of standby time. While it will work for voice calls, this FM transmitter is best suited for music streaming.

Plus, when we did a side-by-side comparison with a direct aux-in connection, our ears struggled to hear a difference. A sturdy mount that takes practical advantage of the CD player you probably never use.

In fact, most people never use the CD player—those who do tend to use it fairly often, pulling the average time up. Instead of the traditional plastic cradle, this mount holds your phone with a magnet, which makes attachment, removal, and repositioning of the phone easier than with any other style of mount we tested.

And the price is great, too—about a half to a third of what most competitors cost. The mount has two main components: You just slide the 0. At the end of a short neck, connected by a ball joint, is a round, flat, magnetic pad about 1.

Thanks to the ball joint, the pad can stay positioned across a wide range of angles, as well as rotate degrees. The Plate is a 2. The Sticker is a 1. Both worked well in our testing. Has the same base as our favorite mount but with a phone cradle instead of a magnet.

It uses the same base as the MagGrip CD but swaps out the magnetic pad for a tension-grip cradle. It uses the same magnetic pad as the MagGrip CD Slot, with the same metal plate and sticker included in the package.

Easy-to-install mount positions an iPad for easy viewing by all backseat passengers. One way to keep the kids occupied during the most boring stretches of a long car trip is to let them enjoy a movie or two on an iPad.

Instead of having them hold the iPad in their lap which tends to make them hunch over while watching, you can mount the iPad on the back of one or both front seats.

Both mounts attach to the metal bars of the front-seat headrests. The Arkon model uses a pair of adjustable clamps that tighten around the post, and its tablet cradle is located on the end of an extendable pole that you can move to a position between the car seats for viewing by all backseat passengers.

The adjustable cradle can hold most 9-inch to inch tablets, in or out of a case, and in portrait or landscape orientation or anywhere in between. Positions an iPad on the back of the front seat for one-person viewing.

The LilGadgets mount attaches directly on the back of a headrest, so only one person in the backseat—the person sitting directly behind that headrest—can view the tablet. Its two spring-loaded arms extend to grab onto opposite diagonal corners of your tablet; you tighten plastic grips around the headrest bars to secure the mount.

It works with tablets from 7 to 11 inches, with or without a case, and you can rotate the holder to your desired orientation, whether that be portrait, landscape, or anything in between.

At some point, almost everyone needs a new set of headphones. Maybe you bought an iPhone 7 and want something wireless to get around the lack of a traditional headphone jack, or you just want to avoid wires when working out.

Most Bluetooth headphones have similar controls on the headphones themselves. The best sound quality, along with good battery life and a comfortable fit. Not everyone needs a Bluetooth headset.

A top-notch model with the right balance of stellar sound quality, long battery life, impressive Bluetooth range, and comfortable fit, the Voyager Edge emerged as the best Bluetooth headset for most people after we tested more than 12 models over 20 hours for our most recent update.

The Voyager Edge hits all the right notes for a Bluetooth headset. A panel of Wirecutter writers and editors agreed that its outgoing audio sounded better than that of other models we tested, and its incoming-call quality was also excellent.

And while no headset is perfect for all ears, another panel of testers said that the Voyager Edge was one of the most comfortable. And the iPad picks up where the iPhone leaves off, thanks to a huge screen that makes browsing and playing music at home even easier.

A terrific speaker, or set of speakers, lets you do just that. For iPhone – and iPad-based listening, we favor wireless speakers that let you move freely about the room—or even the house—without giving up the option to change the music or volume from wherever you happen to be.

Apple device owners have two alternatives for wireless audio connectivity: However, if you pair two devices with the same speaker, and you use both at the same time, those devices can end up fighting over which one is actively connected to the speaker.

Bluetooth range is also limited to around 30 feet for most speakers; only a few newer models provide considerably longer range 65 to feet. AirPlay uses your existing Wi-Fi network to stream audio, giving you range as long as the reach of that network.

Rather than pairing specific devices to specific speakers, AirPlay lets any iOS device send audio to any AirPlay speaker on the network, on the fly, with no setup required.

Before you consider buying a new speaker system for wireless audio at home, take a look around: If you already own a set of powered speakers or a good stereo system, and if you want to use it with your iPhone or iPad, you can simply connect it with a basic audio cable, or you can use an AirPlay or Bluetooth adapter to add wireless-stream capabilities to your existing speakers.

Or what if you wish that your existing audio system offered wireless connectivity? An audio receiver—Bluetooth or AirPlay—can help with that. These devices connect to your existing system to turn it into a wireless speaker, letting you stream audio from your iPhone, iPad, iPod touch, or computer.

Buy whichever is cheaper. These nearly identical products offer good streaming-audio quality and support for high-quality codecs. After spending 13 hours of research identifying 76 candidates, narrowing those down to 14 models that we then used for dozens of hours, and conducting another 13 hours of in-depth testing on ease of use and audio quality, we think the best Bluetooth receiver for most people is either the StarTech BT2A Bluetooth Audio Receiver or the Monoprice Bluetooth Streaming Music Receiver.

Both models offer easy pairing and reliable connections to an iPhone, iPad, Mac, or other Bluetooth-audio device. Each provides both analog and digital audio output, and each has range roughly 30 feet that should easily cover a typical living room, and possibly even an adjacent room.

Both also contain high-quality circuitry for converting digital signals to analog output, and NFC circuitry for easy pairing with some Android devices. If you have higher-quality bookshelf speakers or computer speakers, the Audioengine B1 offers a big step up in audio quality, especially in dynamic range and detail, thanks to better audio circuitry specifically, a superior digital-to-analog converter, or DAC.

And the B1 has an unbelievable foot range: In our testing, it covered a 1,square-foot apartment, including going through a couple of walls, with no audio dropouts.

The Ribbon adds wireless connectivity to your favorite headphones, sounds almost as good as a wired connection, and costs a lot less than buying new headphones. After 16 hours researching Bluetooth audio technology and Bluetooth receivers, we spent dozens of hours using 10 portable models, and four additional hours conducting in-depth testing.

If you want to add Bluetooth connectivity to your current wired headphones —either because your phone lacks a headphone jack or because you just want to be able to listen to audio without a direct wired connection to your phone, tablet, or computer—the BlueAnt Ribbon is the best choice for most people.

Of the handful we tested, the best is the one that Apple makes: The Express can connect via Ethernet to any network, or as a wireless extension when you use it with and later Apple routers, including other AirPort Express routers.

The Express also tends to drop connections—or randomly fail to show up in the iOS and macOS AirPlay menus—much less often than the competition. It also lets you connect a printer via USB to add wireless printing to your home.

A reasonable price and a comfortable, versatile fit make the TuneBand our pick for the best armband for the iPhone 7. As phones grow bigger, running with one strapped to your arm becomes less pleasant.

You can check out our full guide to armbands if you want to learn more about these older models. While most bands take a one-strap-fits-most approach, the TuneBand comes with both large and small bands, providing a secure and comfortable fit on a wide variety of arm sizes.

It works great with phones of all sizes. Many cyclists track their rides using specialized apps that report ride distance, speed, and more. A versatile system with a standout bike mount among other mounting options.

The kit starts with the excellent Quad Lock case, which we picked as a runner-up for the best iPhone case. It has a nifty mounting interface on its back. The mount is curved to fit any stem or handlebar from 25 mm to 44 mm, and you attach it using included zip ties or O-rings.

The zip ties are a bit more stable, and recommended if you plan to keep the mount on one bike. The O-rings still offer security but let you remove the mount easily to share it between different bikes.

Place the case on the mount, push it down, and twist it about 45 degrees, and a spring-loaded lock secures the case to the mount. A physical keyboard can be a boon to your productivity, as most people type more quickly and accurately on real keys than on a glass screen.

However, though iPad keyboard cases are popular and we have recommendations for some good ones below, we think many people would be better served by a stand-alone keyboard and a sturdy iPad stand.

A stand-alone keyboard gives you a full-size keyboard with better keys and better ergonomics than a keyboard case. You can also still use your favorite iPad case, and you can leave the keyboard behind when you want to travel light.

Using a separate keyboard and stand on your lap is pretty tough. Stellar iOS – and Mac-focused keyboard pairs with three devices. The relatively thin and light Easy-Switch offers great, backlit keys in a standard layout and includes a nice batch of iOS special-function keys.

It can also pair with up to three devices—such as your iPad, your phone, and your computer—and let you instantly switch between them. In other words, it can serve as your main keyboard at home, but you can toss it into your bag for a trip to the coffee shop or the library.

If you plan to do a lot of typing on your iPad, this is the keyboard to get. Make sure to get the K, not the K; the latter is designed for Windows and Android. Thin, light, rugged keyboard is appealing for travel.

A version for older pin-dock-connector iPads is also available. The keyboard draws power from the iPad, and you can quickly and easily share it among multiple iPads and iPhones simply by unplugging it from one and plugging it into another.

It combines a usually somewhat cramped Bluetooth keyboard with a protective case, letting you work laptop-style wherever you go. You usually give up the better typing experience of a stand-alone iPad keyboard and the lighter weight of an unencumbered iPad, but you gain convenience and usually good protection.

The keys are backlit, which is useful in a dimly lit lecture hall, and the keyboard pairs with two devices, so you can use it with your smartphone, too. Not as versatile as the Qode Ultimate Pro, but a great keyboard in a nice case.

It has very good keys in a good layout, and it provides a nice array of dedicated iOS-special-function keys. Its keys are smaller and more cramped than the larger version, but its slim, light design is even better with the 9.

As with other iPads, you can use any stand-alone Bluetooth keyboard with the iPad Pro—and you might want to, given that an iPad Pro with a keyboard case is heavier than some MacBooks.

Keyboard cases for the iPad Air 2 will fit the 9. Instead, we recommend buying a stand-alone keyboard and either an iPad mini case with a stand or a dedicated iPad stand. The Adonit Mark is the best all-around option for sketching, writing, and navigation.

The weight of its body is nicely distributed, so you can hold it like a normal pencil and avoid rubbing your palm on the screen. Great for those who want a thicker stylus body or a good size and durability for kids.

If you have an iPad Pro and the money to spare, the Apple Pencil is a no-brainer. If you own an iPad Pro, plan to do a lot of writing and drawing, and have the cash to spare, the Apple Pencil is the best stylus in its class.

Its main drawback is that it currently works only with the iPad Pro. Unfortunately, using an MFi controller has some drawbacks. Second, even though Apple added support for iOS game controllers years ago, developer support remains spotty: Adding controller compatibility is typically an afterthought for most iOS game developers, and even if a developer gives a game such compatibility, the developer rarely tests the feature beyond just making sure the game works with whatever MFi controllers happen to be on hand.

AfterPad maintains a list of controller-compatible games. Great buttons, a comfortable design, and a rechargeable battery. If, after reading those caveats, you still want a game controller, the Steel Series Nimbus Wireless Gaming Controller is the best one out there—unless you play games only on an iPhone.

This is not – it protects the iPad when it’s inside the case and the soft lining is particularly good at protecting the screen from scratches, but you’ll need to take the iPad out to use it.

What a lovely idea this is – and as well as offering an opportunity for your child to exercise their creative impulses and express themselves, it neatly sidesteps the potential pit-trap of buying a Transformers-themed iPad case for a child that no longer likes Transformers.

Don’t like your iPad case? Well, you made it, bucko. You get needle and embroidery thread, fabric and beads, and a blank canvas iPad cover that’s crying out to be customised.

The vendor offers somewhat mixed messages on age suitability, warning that it is both “Suitable from 5 years” and “Not suitable for children under 3 years”. Basically, don’t give it to a toddler.

There are fold-out struts on the back that allow you to set up a ‘rocker’ base; it can also sit flat or be used easel-style. Unlike a lot of the cases here, Fisher Price’s covers the screen – a thin layer of plastic allows the iPad to be used as normal.

The cases we’ve looked at thus far have all been specifically designed for the tastes of children, but it may be that you’re looking for something more generic: If you’re willing to compromise on the looks side of things, you may be able to get a case that’s a bit cheaper, or considerably tougher, or something you’d be happy to carry around yourself.

If that sounds appealing, step on over to our Best tough, rugged and waterproof iPad cases article.

Case for ipad best air waterproof teamviewer

And there’s an iBallz Mini that fits smaller tablets. This is another one that’s only likely to appeal to younger kids, but they should appreciate the cheery design while they’re busy finding new ways to smear jam inside the connector sockets.

The Koooky case has a couple obvious benefits over comparable cases: If penguins aren’t your thing, it’s also available in frog, cat, or slightly odd blue monster varieties. Most of the cases we look at in this roundup are designed to protect an iPad when in use.

This is not – it protects the iPad when it’s inside the case and the soft lining is particularly good at protecting the screen from scratches, but you’ll need to take the iPad out to use it.

What a lovely idea this is – and as well as offering an opportunity for your child to exercise their creative impulses and express themselves, it neatly sidesteps the potential pit-trap of buying a Transformers-themed iPad case for a child that no longer likes Transformers.

Don’t like your iPad case? It’s completely usable inside the bag, and comes with a neoprene armband so you can grab hold of the DryCASE while doing water sports. There aren’t many sturdy cases available for the iPad Pro we guess most people don’t want to take such a big and expensive iPad out on an adventure.

The Ballistic Tough is one robust exception – though it’s also available for the iPad mini and Airs. It has raised lips that protrude from the screen and out of the corners, protecting it from any damage.

A built-in stand enables you to keep the iPad Pro upright. We like the Otterbox Defender as it’s one of the few iPad cases that manages to be truly protective while offering a sense of style.

It’s just a bit better-looking than many of the military offerings around. Cut-out areas expose the Home button, cameras and sensors as well as the Apple logo on the rear, helping the Ottberbox Defender look more Apple-esque than other protective iPad cases.

It’s still rugged, though, with dual-layer cushions and three layers of protection. Considering getting someone an electronics gift? Check out our Gifts section for tons of great gift recommendations, or visit our ultimate guides to the best gifts for women and best gifts for men.

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Notify me of new posts via email. By Tucker Cummings Miller. Updated Nov 5, at 2:

The Omni offers most of the same features as the Smart Case with the exception of button coverage. This is the smaller version of an iPad Pro case we like. Good cases for the iPad mini 1, 2, and 3 are getting more difficult to find: Like overbuilt Ziplocs that keep your gadgets dry on the cheap.

In these situations, a simple waterproof gadget pouch is enough. The company sells more than a dozen versions, from 3 by 6 inches nice for an iPhone 6, 6s, or 7 all the way up to 12 by 50! Inexpensive, well-built cable lets you charge Apple devices at the fastest speeds.

Every device that needs a Lightning-to-USB cable for syncing and charging comes with one. We measured the charging speed of almost 50 cables and then sent the top 11 to former NASA electrical engineer Sam Gordon for teardown analysis.

Though you can get cheaper Lightning cables, we limited our search to those with an MFi certification. That means the manufacturer is licensed by Apple and uses official connectors that are guaranteed to work.

Even with this restriction, dozens of highly rated competitors are out there. We chose the Anker for a few reasons. The first is its aforementioned electrical capability. The second is its respectable length: Anker PowerPort 4 Multiport charger Affordable, fast, and compact, the PowerPort 4 is great for use at home or on the road.

In fact, it can simultaneously charge three full-size iPads at full speed while also charging a smartphone. We surveyed more than 1, Wirecutter readers, and they told us that they preferred chargers that plug directly into an outlet rather than using a long power cord, and this charger is the most powerful one we tested to do so.

It plugs directly into an outlet instead of using a detachable power cable, and it sports fold-up prongs that make it a bit more compact for packing and prevent the prongs from bending during travel.

Each port also allows a power draw of up to 2. With that in mind, we think the PowerPort 4 makes for the perfect pick. But if you do need a charger with more ports and more power, we have picks for that, too.

A solid case that provides the most juice for the money. Although the various iPhone 6 models have the largest batteries in Apple handsets to date, they can still run dry during days of heavy use.

We tested 25 battery cases over more than hours to find the best picks for both phone sizes. We tested each of those 25 battery cases by fully charging them and then installing a completely drained iPhone set to Airplane mode.

When the iPhone reached a percent charge—or when it stopped charging—we removed it from the case. We repeated the test a total of three times per case over the course of more than hours.

The Ultra Slim Extended Battery Case is our pick for the iPhone 6 and 6s because it provides the greatest charge percentage per dollar 2. We also appreciate its slim design and lightweight body.

The Energi Sliding Power Case is something of a different story. Capable of delivering an 83 percent charge to the gigantic iPhone 6 Plus battery just 9 percent less than the most powerful battery case we tested, this model is also notable because it has an inner case that you can separate from the charger.

And the protective case is actually pretty good—it could compete with some of the stand-alone iPhone 6 Plus cases we recommend. These packs come in many different sizes.

If you want to be able to refill a phone completely after a busy day and need something slimmer than the Bolt, get our runner-up pick, the EasyAcc mAh Ultra Slim Power Bank. Our larger pick, the Anker PowerCore, can charge your phone every day for a week or keep a fleet of devices going for shorter stints.

For more recommendations, see our full guide to USB battery packs. Attractive, stable charge-and-sync dock even works with an iPad. A pedestal to hold your device sits in front of a taller pillar that supports the back of the phone or tablet.

You can also adjust the support pillar to match the thickness of your device or its case. Each of these sits nicely on the HiRise while charging, with no adjustment necessary.

Swap that in place of the Lightning cable, and you can dock your battery-case-equipped iPhone. The HiRise Deluxe is the most versatile and most thoughtfully designed dock you can find.

Not as sturdy or versatile as the HiRise, but it includes a 3. But what if you want to use your favorite wired headphones and charge your phone at the same time? Place your iPhone 7 or 7 Plus or any other Lightning-connector iPhone on the dock—it works with most thin cases—and you can plug your Lightning-connector charging cable and your 3.

We expect to see a good number of similar items from third-party vendors over the next few months, but right now this is your best option. If you want to watch video on your iPad without holding it in your hands, to type on an external keyboard, or to use the tablet while cooking in the kitchen, you need a stand.

Your favorite iPad case might double as a stand, but if not, you have scores of options for dedicated stands. Ideally, it will look nice, too. And for a portable stand, it also needs to be light and packable.

Inexpensive, featherweight stand is surprisingly sturdy. Although this stand weighs less than an ounce and folds flat, it offers three angles and a surprisingly sturdy design.

The Foldable iDevice Stand accommodates all but the thickest iPad cases, and it also works great with an iPhone for hands-free video watching or FaceTime calls—or with a Kindle or other e-reader.

Machined from heavy-gauge steel with rubber bumpers to protect your tablet, the Compass 2 is the size of a few pens when you collapse it for travel; when you expand this model, easel-style, it offers more stability than the Kanex stand, especially with an iPad in portrait orientation.

The Compass 2 is also a lot more attractive and available in multiple colors red, black, or silver, and it offers a nifty low-angle position for on-screen typing and easier flat-on-the-desk viewing.

Bulky but rock-solid stand is surprisingly versatile. If your hands-free iPad use will be mostly in one location—say, on a desk or on the kitchen counter—you can sacrifice portability for stability.

Dozens of stands have come across my desk over the past few years, but none has impressed me enough to give up the Rest. Easier to hide away, this stand has grippy material and a weighted base for stability.

Of course, some people would prefer something a bit less conspicuous than the Rest, and the Stump Stand is happy to oblige. Molded from a single piece of silicone in a number of colors with a metal weight inside for stability, the Stump Stand measures just 4 inches across but weighs nearly 9.

It accommodates most cases up to half an inch thick, and grooves in the stand provide three viewing angles: The front of the Stump Stand even has a handy Home-button cutout. The sticky-silicone base of the stand keeps it from moving, and it works with any tablet or phone.

Each of its two ports can provide up to 2. Packed into this tiny unit is the capability to simultaneously charge two full-size tablets at full speed. In addition, it can differentiate between kinds of devices to deliver the proper charging current to each, something not every charger can do.

Of course, it can also fast-charge any two tablets, smartphones, or any other combination of USB-powered devices. In our tests, the PowerDrive 2 stood up to every device we tried, including multiple iPhones, multiple iPads, a OnePlus One, and a Samsung Galaxy S5, charging each device at its respective top rate.

Compared with the competition, the PowerDrive 2 offers the best balance of power and price, and it comes from a reputable company. And while in the past you had to decide whether a second USB-charging port was worth paying extra for, the price of the two-port PowerDrive 2 is so low that you have no reason to consider a single-port model.

If you value call quality over sound, a visor-clip speakerphone is the way to go; if you care more about music and podcast sound quality than about clear calls, choose an FM transmitter.

Because these kits connect to your phone using Bluetooth, they all work with the iPhone 7 and 7 Plus. Audio quality is as good as or better than that of any other unit we tested, plus you get track-control buttons on the main unit.

If your main use of in-car Bluetooth is phone calls, this model has the best audio and features. It offers easy pairing, clear and crisp audio, a few native voice commands, and built-in motion sensors that can detect when you leave and reenter the car—it powers down when it detects no motion, powering up and reconnecting to your phone when you get back in.

The Roadster 2 also offers the best battery life of the speakerphones we tested, with up to 20 hours of talk time and up to three weeks of standby time. While it will work for voice calls, this FM transmitter is best suited for music streaming.

Plus, when we did a side-by-side comparison with a direct aux-in connection, our ears struggled to hear a difference. A sturdy mount that takes practical advantage of the CD player you probably never use.

In fact, most people never use the CD player—those who do tend to use it fairly often, pulling the average time up. Instead of the traditional plastic cradle, this mount holds your phone with a magnet, which makes attachment, removal, and repositioning of the phone easier than with any other style of mount we tested.

And the price is great, too—about a half to a third of what most competitors cost. The mount has two main components: You just slide the 0. At the end of a short neck, connected by a ball joint, is a round, flat, magnetic pad about 1.

Thanks to the ball joint, the pad can stay positioned across a wide range of angles, as well as rotate degrees. The Plate is a 2. The Sticker is a 1. Both worked well in our testing.

Has the same base as our favorite mount but with a phone cradle instead of a magnet. It uses the same base as the MagGrip CD but swaps out the magnetic pad for a tension-grip cradle.

It uses the same magnetic pad as the MagGrip CD Slot, with the same metal plate and sticker included in the package. Easy-to-install mount positions an iPad for easy viewing by all backseat passengers.

One way to keep the kids occupied during the most boring stretches of a long car trip is to let them enjoy a movie or two on an iPad. Instead of having them hold the iPad in their lap which tends to make them hunch over while watching, you can mount the iPad on the back of one or both front seats.

Both mounts attach to the metal bars of the front-seat headrests. The Arkon model uses a pair of adjustable clamps that tighten around the post, and its tablet cradle is located on the end of an extendable pole that you can move to a position between the car seats for viewing by all backseat passengers.

The adjustable cradle can hold most 9-inch to inch tablets, in or out of a case, and in portrait or landscape orientation or anywhere in between. Positions an iPad on the back of the front seat for one-person viewing.

The LilGadgets mount attaches directly on the back of a headrest, so only one person in the backseat—the person sitting directly behind that headrest—can view the tablet.

Its two spring-loaded arms extend to grab onto opposite diagonal corners of your tablet; you tighten plastic grips around the headrest bars to secure the mount. It works with tablets from 7 to 11 inches, with or without a case, and you can rotate the holder to your desired orientation, whether that be portrait, landscape, or anything in between.

At some point, almost everyone needs a new set of headphones. Maybe you bought an iPhone 7 and want something wireless to get around the lack of a traditional headphone jack, or you just want to avoid wires when working out.

Most Bluetooth headphones have similar controls on the headphones themselves. The best sound quality, along with good battery life and a comfortable fit. Not everyone needs a Bluetooth headset.

A top-notch model with the right balance of stellar sound quality, long battery life, impressive Bluetooth range, and comfortable fit, the Voyager Edge emerged as the best Bluetooth headset for most people after we tested more than 12 models over 20 hours for our most recent update.

The Voyager Edge hits all the right notes for a Bluetooth headset. A panel of Wirecutter writers and editors agreed that its outgoing audio sounded better than that of other models we tested, and its incoming-call quality was also excellent.

And while no headset is perfect for all ears, another panel of testers said that the Voyager Edge was one of the most comfortable. And the iPad picks up where the iPhone leaves off, thanks to a huge screen that makes browsing and playing music at home even easier.

A terrific speaker, or set of speakers, lets you do just that. For iPhone – and iPad-based listening, we favor wireless speakers that let you move freely about the room—or even the house—without giving up the option to change the music or volume from wherever you happen to be.

Apple device owners have two alternatives for wireless audio connectivity: However, if you pair two devices with the same speaker, and you use both at the same time, those devices can end up fighting over which one is actively connected to the speaker.

Bluetooth range is also limited to around 30 feet for most speakers; only a few newer models provide considerably longer range 65 to feet. AirPlay uses your existing Wi-Fi network to stream audio, giving you range as long as the reach of that network.

Rather than pairing specific devices to specific speakers, AirPlay lets any iOS device send audio to any AirPlay speaker on the network, on the fly, with no setup required.

Before you consider buying a new speaker system for wireless audio at home, take a look around: If you already own a set of powered speakers or a good stereo system, and if you want to use it with your iPhone or iPad, you can simply connect it with a basic audio cable, or you can use an AirPlay or Bluetooth adapter to add wireless-stream capabilities to your existing speakers.

Or what if you wish that your existing audio system offered wireless connectivity? An audio receiver—Bluetooth or AirPlay—can help with that. These devices connect to your existing system to turn it into a wireless speaker, letting you stream audio from your iPhone, iPad, iPod touch, or computer.

Buy whichever is cheaper. These nearly identical products offer good streaming-audio quality and support for high-quality codecs. After spending 13 hours of research identifying 76 candidates, narrowing those down to 14 models that we then used for dozens of hours, and conducting another 13 hours of in-depth testing on ease of use and audio quality, we think the best Bluetooth receiver for most people is either the StarTech BT2A Bluetooth Audio Receiver or the Monoprice Bluetooth Streaming Music Receiver.

Both models offer easy pairing and reliable connections to an iPhone, iPad, Mac, or other Bluetooth-audio device. Each provides both analog and digital audio output, and each has range roughly 30 feet that should easily cover a typical living room, and possibly even an adjacent room.

Both also contain high-quality circuitry for converting digital signals to analog output, and NFC circuitry for easy pairing with some Android devices. If you have higher-quality bookshelf speakers or computer speakers, the Audioengine B1 offers a big step up in audio quality, especially in dynamic range and detail, thanks to better audio circuitry specifically, a superior digital-to-analog converter, or DAC.

And the B1 has an unbelievable foot range: In our testing, it covered a 1,square-foot apartment, including going through a couple of walls, with no audio dropouts.

The Ribbon adds wireless connectivity to your favorite headphones, sounds almost as good as a wired connection, and costs a lot less than buying new headphones. After 16 hours researching Bluetooth audio technology and Bluetooth receivers, we spent dozens of hours using 10 portable models, and four additional hours conducting in-depth testing.

You use the hand-pump to remove all the air from the bag, and the tight seal keeps it dry even when underwater. It’s completely usable inside the bag, and comes with a neoprene armband so you can grab hold of the DryCASE while doing water sports.

There aren’t many sturdy cases available for the iPad Pro we guess most people don’t want to take such a big and expensive iPad out on an adventure. The Ballistic Tough is one robust exception – though it’s also available for the iPad mini and Airs.

It has raised lips that protrude from the screen and out of the corners, protecting it from any damage. A built-in stand enables you to keep the iPad Pro upright. We like the Otterbox Defender as it’s one of the few iPad cases that manages to be truly protective while offering a sense of style.

It’s just a bit better-looking than many of the military offerings around. Cut-out areas expose the Home button, cameras and sensors as well as the Apple logo on the rear, helping the Ottberbox Defender look more Apple-esque than other protective iPad cases.

Both stylus options are solid, and the one that is best for you depends on what kind of apps you generally use your stylus with. This make it ideal for art students who need to do fine work, or students who need a fine point to write down as much info as possible on a crib sheet.

The smudge solution that is easiest to use is a CleanVu pad, which is a lot simpler and more effective than a microfiber cloth. Handoff is a great feature in iOS 8 that lets you start a task on your iPad, and finish it on your computer or other Apple device.

The MacBook Air is extremely lightweight, making it great for students who need to lug an already-heavy backpack all over campus. It also has some great productivity tools that can help you make stunning presentations for your job.

Considering getting someone an electronics gift? Check out our Gifts section for tons of great gift recommendations, or visit our ultimate guides to the best gifts for women and best gifts for men.

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400 watts waterproof ipad air best case for free

And the price is great, too—about a half to a third of what most competitors cost. There aren’t many sturdy cases available for the iPad Pro we guess most people don’t want to take such a big and expensive iPad out on an adventure. Easier to hide away, this stand has grippy material and a weighted base for stability. This was from about 6 months ago. Check out our Gifts section for tons of great gift recommendations, or visit our ultimate guides to the best gifts for women and best gifts for men. While it will work for voice calls, this FM transmitter is best suited for music streaming.

We tested 18 cases for the iPad Pro using the same criteria we used for other iPad case models, ultimately finding two designs we liked. So it is universal. AirPlay uses your existing Wi-Fi network to stream audio, giving you range as long as the reach of that network. It presents all its features in an easy-to-navigate layout, rather than using the convoluted menu systems of some of the competition.

The sticky-silicone base of the stand keeps it from moving, and it works with any tablet or phone. Make sure to get the K, not the K; the latter is designed for Windows and Android. The more expensive JetDrive Go has the same features as our pick but comes in a sleeker package.

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Nuances grey waterproof air ipad best for case england

You usually give up the better typing experience of a stand-alone iPad keyboard and the lighter weight of an unencumbered iPad, but you gain convenience and usually good protection. It also lets you connect a printer via USB to add wireless printing to your home. The Express can connect via Ethernet to any network, or as a wireless extension when you use it with and later Apple routers, including other AirPort Express routers. Packed into this tiny unit is the capability to simultaneously charge two full-size tablets at full speed. See…

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