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Best apple apps for iphone 4s

Best apple apps for iphone 4s





Valid till 2017/5/25



Oct 14, · So you’re getting an iPhone 4S. Fantastic. But with more than, apps in the App Store, finding the best ones is no easy task. Mashable is here to help. iPhone & Apple Watch App – Designed for iPhone and Apple Watch, compatible with iPad. Apple ® named it one of ‘s 10 Best Apps of the Year, [More Details]. Oct 15, · The Apple iPhone 4S for Sprint makes it easy to call, take photos, surf the Web and play games—the tasks that most people want to accomplish with their.
To start, just enroll Apple Chase Apple’s come a long way with its photo app, but it still lags Apps the one built by its biggest competitor. Three options Iphone available: Best you get the sense eBay’s designers can’t get through a month without redesigning their app, it’s always far superior to using the online auction site in a browser. Mostly, though, we’re fond of Hello Weather because it eschews complexity without limiting the information For offer. The app isn’t just for individuals anymore, either. Depending on the author, you might just get a few pages of photos; some also add a little commentary — although text content is typically succinct in Steller stories, because pictures do the talking.
Oct 14, · So you’re getting an iPhone 4S. Fantastic. But with more than, apps in the App Store, finding the best ones is no easy task. Mashable is here to help. iPhone & Apple Watch App – Designed for iPhone and Apple Watch, compatible with iPad. Apple ® named it one of ‘s 10 Best Apps of the Year, [More Details]. Oct 15, · The Apple iPhone 4S for Sprint makes it easy to call, take photos, surf the Web and play games—the tasks that most people want to accomplish with their.

best apple apps for iphone 4s

best apple apps for iphone 4s

best apple apps for iphone 4s

best apple apps for iphone 4s

best apple apps for iphone 4s

best apple apps for iphone 4s

best apple apps for iphone 4s

best apple apps for iphone 4s

Download for apps best iphone 4s apple samsung mobile phones

Just install the app and stream the hit series Riverdale, along with The Flash, Supergirl, You get all the basics — cropping, rotation, healing brushes, and the like — but the filters are where you can get really creative. The memorizing bit is based around minutes-long drills. Just messing about with the audio alone is quite fun, but it all properly comes together when making a video. The app doesn’t quite check off our entire wish-list – the lack of a rainfall radar or at least a precipitation prediction graph for the coming hour is a pity. Optimized for iPhone 8, 7, 6s and iOS Do your banking right from your mobile device You can manage your accounts, make deposits, find ATMs and more.

I was able to get data speeds to drop by gripping the phone from both ends in a bizarre two-handed clench, but really, nobody uses a phone that way. Call quality on Sprint’s network through the phone’s earpiece was excellent in my tests.

The earpiece goes loud, there’s a touch of side tone, and I didn’t hear any distortion at high volumes. Transmissions through the mic were sadly rather tinny, but they were perfectly loud and the mic blocked background noise very well.

The speakerphone is fine for indoor use, but not loud enough to use outdoors; transmissions through the speakerphone were very clear. The Bluetooth headset also worked for music.

Sprint’s iPhone is a world phone which roams internationally for insanely high rates you can find at www. There’s a SIM card in it which “existing customers in good standing” can request to be unlocked, so they can replace it with a less-expensive alternative overseas.

The iPhone 4S got 7 hours, 33 minutes of 3G talk time. That’s considerably longer than the iPhone 4 for Verizon, which got 6 hours, 17 minutes, and it delivers on Apple’s promise of longer battery life – as long as you have strong wireless signal.

And I’m worried about the Sprint network’s ability to handle the strain. On launch day, all of my Sprint phones were crawling along at a pathetic kbps, with some data sessions taking several seconds to connect.

Once I was connected, I was connected—I didn’t drop calls or data sessions—but it was like I was waiting in line to get on the Internet. Sprint, for its part, says it didn’t see any problems in New York City that day.

And we’ve seen slow speeds on Sprint before. But pour some data into this baby, and wow, it’ll go. It benchmarks faster than any Android Gingerbread phone and faster than any Windows Phone.

Side by side against the Motorola Photon on the same Wi-Fi network, the iPhone 4S consistently loaded pages a few seconds faster. The great browsing speed comes in part from the new iOS 5, which we found made browsing much faster on all iPhones.

It also comes in part from the new dual-core A5 processor, the same one used in the iPad 2. There aren’t a lot of third-party apps that take advantage of the dual-core processor and new GPU yet, but it’s key to some of the phone’s best experiences, such as the p camera, AirPlay video streaming to Apple TV devices, and the browser.

And remember that on Sprint, unlike every other iPhone carrier, you get truly unlimited cellular data right now. That’s a good deal for heavy users, even if the data connection is slower than on other carriers.

There’s one exception to the unlimited data policy: He’s the head of our Fastest Mobile Networks project, one of the hosts of the daily PCMag Live Web show and speaks frequently in mass media on cell-phone-related issues.

Segan is also a multiple award-winning travel writer, having contributed The iPhone X has a few quirks developers need to address; these apps are ahead of the curve. The iPhone X has a very unusual L-shaped, dual-cell battery.

TaoMix 2 is one of the best, due to its gorgeous interface and the flexibility of the soundscapes you create. You start off with a blank canvas, to which you drag noises that are represented as neon discs.

These can be recolored and resized, and positioned wherever you like on the screen. A circle is then placed to balance the mix, or flicked to meander about, so the various sounds ebb and flow over time.

For free, you get eight sounds, can save custom mixes, and can even import your own recordings. Many dozens of additional sounds are available via various affordable IAP.

Whereas other guides typically concentrate on a few major cities, Triposo drills down into tiny towns and villages as well, helping you get the best out of wherever you happen to be staying.

Beyond that, the app is easy to use, and it optionally works offline, enabling you to download guides on a regional basis. This camera app uses live filtering to replicate the visuals you might once have seen on a classic games system — or other old-school kit like oscilloscopes.

Filters can have their properties adjusted, and you can add text, retro-oriented stickers, freeform scribbles, and borders to a photo, before sharing the results.

Note that some options are limited in the free version, and output adds a Famicam 64 banner to the bottom of the image. Open a list and you get offered a few cards, which you swipe Tinder-style: Adobe Photoshop Sketch is a drawing and painting tool, designed for anyone who fancies dabbling in natural media.

Select a canvas and you can work with virtual pens, markers, acrylic, ink and watercolor. A layers system provides scope for complex art, and stencils enable precision when required.

With its large display and the Apple Pencil, the iPad seems the natural home for a coloring app like Pigment. Even on the smaller screen, it excels. You get quick access to a set of top-notch coloring tools, and a range of intricate illustrations to work on.

Sure, buy a subscription and you gain access to a much bigger range; but for free, you still get an awful lot. Amusingly, the app also offers options for staying inside the lines.

The iPhone version of GarageBand has always been ambitious. Smart piano strips have been expanded to all keyboard instruments, helping anyone to play perfect melodies.

And Audio Unit support exists to load third-party synths directly inside of GarageBand, similar to how plug-ins work on desktop music-making apps. Because of these things, GarageBand is now even more suited to musicians of all skill levels — although be aware on smaller screens that the app can be a touch fiddly, what with there being so much going on.

With Instapaper, such problems vanish. The app is effectively time-shifting for the web. You load articles and it saves them for later. Even better, it strips cruft, leaving only the content in a mobile-optimized view ideal for iPhone.

Should you end up with a large archive, articles can be filtered or organized into folders. Want to find something specific? Full-text search has you covered. The idea behind Adobe Photoshop Fix is to enable you to rapidly retouch and restore photos on your iPhone — using the power of Photoshop.

But Photoshop Fix has some serious power within its straightforward interface, too, as evidenced by excellent vignette, defocus, and color tools. The best bit, though, is Liquify. Using this feature, you can mash a photo to bits or make really subtle changes, depending on the subject matter.

Unsurprisingly, Wikipedia is an app for browsing Wikipedia, the massive online encyclopedia that makes all paper-based equivalents green with envy. Wikipedia gets the basics right: Finding the text a bit small?

You can resize it in two taps. The free version offers a small selection of sounds to soothe your soul — white noise, rain, wind, thunder, and wind chimes.

To create some ambience, you simply drag one or more noise icons to an on-screen grid; the items towards the top play at a higher volume, and those towards the right become more complex in nature.

Many apps attempt to emulate film stock, but most go for an over-saturated, larger-than-life take on old-school photography. By contrast, Filmborn is all about realism, arming you with tools to make you a better photographer.

The icon-heavy interface takes some getting used to; but once you know where everything is, Filmborn quickly replaces the stock camera app — or any other app you had previously favored. Much of this is down to features such as manual controls and a superb blown highlights preview, which covers problematic areas of your potential snap in red.

But even in its free incarnation, Filmborn is an essential download. This music-creation app manages the tricky combination of being broadly approachable to the masses yet providing real scope for advanced composition.

The app automatically loops recordings, can align notes to the beat, and gives you options for adjusting tempo, scale, and effects. Its main differentiator over the competition is speed. Once you crack how it works, you can very rapidly fashion loops comprising several overlaid drum tracks, bass, keyboard arpeggios, and lush chords.

Easy Chords will play chords for the current scale when you tap a single note. Want to tweak things? Delve into the piano roll and move individual notes.

For free, this is astonishing stuff. The only limit is the available sounds, but these, naturally, can be expanded via various affordable IAPs. You might not associate taking medication with a hip and cool iPhone, but technology can be a boon to anyone with such requirements.

Flexible preferences enable you to set up cross-device sync, push notifications, and to export data – and reminding users to refill will be a real help too.

That the app is free is generous, given the job it does — and how well it does it. MultiTimer, as its name might suggest, gives you multiple timers that you can set going simultaneously.

Each has a different color, name and icon. Tap a timer and it starts, tap again to pause, or double-tap to reset. You also have plenty of preferences to delve into, including adjusting the default workspace.

There are loads of to-do apps on the App Store, but Productive has a different goal: You create habits within the app that are designed to be simple and assigned to a period of the day, making for straightforward but flexible planning.

Bright icons atop a deep gray background make your list simple to browse, and the calendar pages ensure tracking progress is a breeze. You can add iOS reminders to any item, too, although we preferred regularly visiting the app — a nice habit in itself.

MuseCam dispenses with the gimmickry seen in many iPhone camera apps, instead concentrating on manual control over shutter, ISO, white balance and focus.

There’s no means to use a volume button for the shutter, nor RAW support, but otherwise it’s a solid camera. The app is also an editor. You select a Camera Roll item, add film-inspired filter presets, and make further adjustments.

Again, this feels like serious fare, but MuseCam wisely provides enough tools for pro-oriented iPhone photographers while remaining accessible enough for newcomers. Interestingly, edits made on Camera Roll items remain accessible in MuseCam regardless of whether you export your final work, meaning you can later return to and update in-progress projects.

All in all, MuseCam feels refined and mature. That it’s free bar the option of splashing out on additional presets by way of IAP and also ad-free is remarkable. With VR glasses strapping your iPhone to your face, the experience is at once deeply strange and excitingly varied.

Smartly, the app also works as a standard degree video, which might not have the same immersive clout, but remains impressive all the same. Google and Apple may be rivals, but that doesn’t stop them building on each other’s work, as evidenced in Motion Stills, an app which takes the idea of Live Photos and runs with it.

Putting your Live Photos through Motion Stills adds Google’s stabilization technology to them, reducing the amount of visible camera shake, but that’s just the beginning. If you like the idea – but not the reality – of Live Photos then Motion Stills is the app for you, and you’re not limited to using it for new images – you can also fix up any Live Photos you’ve already taken.

If you lack the patience for working with full-on stop motion apps, but nonetheless fancy yourself as a mini-Aardman, Loop by Seedling is just the ticket. You shoot frames using your camera, and can handily overlay your previous photo in semi-transparent form, to ensure everything is properly lined up.

Once you’re done, you can play your photos as an animation, where tools are available to adjust the frame rate, add a filter, and mess about with grid collages, creating a Warhol-like animated GIF to share.

The interface is a bit opaque — quite a lot of controls need to be ‘discovered’ before you become comfortable with using this app. VPNs have become commonplace in a world where countries routinely block internet access to key content.

In some cases, you may merely be blocked from accessing media libraries; elsewhere, even news and social media may be beyond reach. The idea behind Opera VPN is to enable anyone to access otherwise inaccessible online content, entirely for free.

You get a small selection of regions to choose from, after which point your iPhone effectively thinks it’s in whatever country you selected. Although it won’t unlock all overseas services Netflix, notably, is wise to VPNs these days, it’s at the very least a good first place to try if you find you can’t get at a particular corner of the internet.

From the brains behind game-like language-learning app Duolingo comes Tinycards. The aim is to enable people to memorize anything by way of friendly flashcard sets.

Duolingo itself offers a number of sets based around language, history and geography. Smartly, though, anyone can create and publish a set, which has led to hundreds of decks about all kinds of subjects, from renaissance art to retro computing.

The memorizing bit is based around minutes-long drills. This being a Google app, some of the smart bits are somewhat reliant on you being ensconced in the Google ecosystem — reservations need to be sucked in from Gmail, for example.

Everything happens entirely automatically — you just select a character and background, gurn into the camera, watch a seemingly sentient floating hamburger mirror your very expression, and have a little sit down to think about the terrifying advance of technology.

For those not freaked out by the hamburger to the point that they hurl their iPhones into the sea, FaceRig provides plenty of characters, unlocked using tokens earned through regular use or bought using IAP.

One-time darling of the digital check-in crowd, Foursquare in reworked its app to focus entirely on local search. Although this irked fans who’d been there since the beginning, it’s hard to criticize the app we’ve been left with.

On iPhone, you start with a search field, beneath which sits a handy list of relatively local places of interest. Tap an item and you gain access to a photo gallery, basic details, and a slew of reviews.

In the main, Foursquare is quite obsessed with food, drink and nightlife, but the ‘fun’ and ‘more’ categories house plenty of additional places to visit, from gig venues and cinemas to rather more sedate options like parks and historic sites.

Filters and ‘tastes’ options within the app’s settings enable you to further hone down recommended choices, and anything you fancy reminding yourself of on a more permanent basis can be added to a custom list.

When you see an app describe itself as a ‘workout and kitchen timer’, you might wonder what its developers get up to. The app itself is extremely user-friendly. You get three types of timer – single-use, stopwatch, and reusable.

The last of those can have one or more steps. This means you can, for example, devise an exercise routine, and Timeglass will methodically work its way through the steps, optionally barking each one’s name or playing an alert noise.

Otherwise, this is an excellent timer app, and it’s also properly free, entirely lacking IAP. Although most fans want to cheer on their soccer team by hollering from the stands or, second best, yelling at a TV in a pub, that’s not always possible.

When you’re otherwise busy, Onefootball is a great means of keeping track of your favorites. The app’s a cinch to set up. Choose your teams, allow Onefootball to send notifications, and then let the app work its magic.

On match days, you’ll be notified of every goal, which, depending on your team’s fortunes, may make you thrill at or dread hearing the notification sound. If you at any point need a little more detail, venture into the app and you’ll discover everything from live tickers to customized news feeds.

If you like the idea of editing home movies but are a modern-day being with no time or attention span, try Quik. The app automates the entire process, enabling you to create beautiful videos with a few taps and show off to your friends without needing talent – surely the epitome of today’s hashtag generation.

All you need do is select some videos and photos, and choose a style. Quik then edits them into a great-looking video you can share with friends and family. But if your inner filmmaker hankers for a little more control, you can adjust the style, music, format and pace, along with trimming clips, reordering items, and adding titles to get the effect you desire.

Cementing its friendly nature, Quik offers a little pairs minigame for you to mess about with while the app renders your masterpiece. And there’s even a weekly ‘For You’ video Quik compiles without you lifting a finger.

We’ve seen quite a few apps that try to turn your photos into art, but none manage it with quite the same raw ability as Prisma. The app is almost disarmingly simple to use: The app within a few seconds then transforms your photo into a miniature Picasso or Munch, and it’s instantly better than most of us could ever hope to achieve with Photoshop.

On trying Prisma with a range of imagery, we found it almost never comes up with a duff result thanks to some insanely smart processing. But if you find the effects a bit jarring, a slide of your finger can soften your chosen filter prior to sharing your masterpiece online.

Our only criticism is the app’s fairly low-res output, making Prisma pics only suitable for screen use – but it’s a real must-have. It snaps retro pixelated black and white photos, with dithering right out of Mac co-creator Bill Atkinson’s playbook.

But what really sets BitCam apart is its authenticity. Tap the settings button and a window zooms in, using the same effect Mac old hands will remember from the s.

Even the interface apes old-school Macs, from the checkboxes and OK button to the trashcan that appears after you take a photo. There are, though, some concessions to post living: The camera sitting inside your iPhone is pretty amazing.

In fact, plenty of people think it’s too amazing, the clarity and purity of digital shots having lost the ‘character’ found in photography of old. Retrica brings a sense of creativity and randomness to iPhone snaps – and more besides.

Filters are Retrica’s main trick. You can manually select one from a list which can be managed, for faster access to favorites or try your luck by stabbing the shuffle button.

A selected filter’s strength can be adjusted, but there’s sadly no quick ‘filter off’ switch. The filters, though, are varied and interesting, and you can optionally add a blur and vignette.

It’s also possible to apply Retrica filters to shots taken elsewhere, if you prefer taking ‘clean’ pics and messing around with them later. Retrica also plays with time. You can take multi-shots, your photos subsequently being stitched together on a grid there are well over a dozen options to choose from, or played in sequence as an exportable GIF.

Alternatively, hold the shutter and the app starts recording video, using your chosen filter. For five dollarpounds, we’d have written a glowing review about Retrica, but for free this is an astonishing gift – a superb and unmissable creative camera app.

If you used to sit there at school, doodling flick-animation masterpieces in the corner of your jotter, Animatic is the iPhone equivalent. You use simple tools to scribble on a small canvas, and then build your animation frame-by-frame.

The app uses a basic onion-skin approach, meaning you can see the previous few frames faintly behind the current one, ensuring whatever you draw doesn’t lurch all over the place. Once you’re done, you can adjust the animation speed of your creation and export it to video or GIF.

Given that you’re scribbling with what amounts to the iPhone equivalent of felt pens, you won’t be crafting the next Pixar movie here. But Animatic is fun, a great way to get into animation, and a useful sketchpad for those already dabbling.

The app also includes a bunch of demos, showcasing what’s possible with a little time, effort and imagination. Plenty of apps claim they can get you making music in seconds, but Figure really means it.

The app’s heritage helps, as it comes from Propellerhead Software, creators of the legendary Reason and ReBirth. In Figure, though, working on loops and beats is stripped right back from what you’d find in those complex PC apps; instead, you tap out drums, and slide your finger around to fashion monster bass and playful leads.

Sounds can be tweaked or swapped out entirely at any point. Once you’re done, finished tracks can be uploaded and shared online. For serious musicians, there’s even Audiobus support.

There’s a tendency for weather apps to either bombard you with facts or try to be too clever with design Hello Weather, by contrast, simply wants to get you all the weather information you need, but nothing you don’t.

This focused approach doesn’t mean Hello Weather is an ugly app. On the contrary, it’s very smart, with a clean layout and readable graphs. Mostly, though, we’re fond of Hello Weather because it eschews complexity without limiting the information on offer.

The single-page view is split in three, covering current conditions, the next few hours, and the week’s forecast. The app doesn’t quite check off our entire wish-list – the lack of a rainfall radar or at least a precipitation prediction graph for the coming hour is a pity.

But as a free no-fuss weather app, Hello Weather is hard to beat. The idea behind Cheatsheet is to provide fast access to tiny chunks of information you never remember but really need to: Set-up is pleasingly straightforward.

Using the app, you add ‘cheats’ by selecting an icon and then typing your info nugget. When you’ve got yourself a number of ‘cheats’, they can be reordered as you see fit. Once you’re done, the entire lot can be displayed on the Today widget or an Apple Watch.

But the free version is nonetheless useful and generous, along with making really good use of the Today view on your phone. With the vast range of movies available at any given time, keeping track of what you’d like to see and what you’ve watched already isn’t easy.

TodoMovies 4 aims to simplify the process and aid discovery. The app starts off with the discovery bit, having you check out lists that range from Academy Award nominees to those with the ‘greatest gun fights of all time’.

Beyond this, you can browse by genre, explore upcoming films and what’s on in theatres, or perform a search for something specific. Selecting a film loads artwork, and most have a trailer.

Watched films can be removed or sent to your Watched list, whereupon they can be rated. This mix of focus and friendliness – along with some very smart design – makes this app a no-brainer download for movie buffs.

Snapseed is an extremely versatile photo editor for iPhone. You choose from a number of tools and filters, and proceed to pinch and swipe your way to a transformed image. You get all the basics — cropping, rotation, healing brushes, and the like — but the filters are where you can get really creative.

There are blurs, photographic effects, and more extreme options like ‘grunge’ and ‘grainy film’, which can add plenty of atmosphere to your photographs. The vast majority of effects are tweakable, mostly by dragging up and down on the canvas to select a parameter and then horizontally to adjust its strength.

Brilliantly, the app also records applied effects as separate layers, each of which remains fully editable until you decide to save your image and work on something else. It’s no secret that Apple Maps doesn’t have the best reputation, although it has got better in recent times.

Fortunately, Google Maps is a free download, and a far better solution than the old Google Maps app as well, thanks to the inclusion of turn-by-turn navigation and – in some cities – public transport directions.

Handily, it can also save chunks of maps for offline use – great when you’re heading somewhere with poor connectivity. It’s an easy way to supercharge your iPhone’s mapping capabilities and one of the first apps you should grab for the iPhone 7.

If you live in or visit one of the supported cities which include London, Paris, Berlin and New York, Citymapper is an essential download, assuming you want to find your way around more easily.

It’ll zero in on your location and then intelligently get you from A to B, providing all kinds of travel options and routing, and, where relevant, live times for transit. Sometimes with apps, it’s the seemingly little things that make a big difference.

With Overcast, for example, you get a perfectly decent podcast app that does everything you’d expect: But where Overcast excels is in attempting to save you time and improve your listening experience.

Effects which can be assigned per-podcast provide the smartest playback speed-up we’ve heard, voice boost for improving the clarity of talky shows, and smart speed. The last of those attempts to shorten silences.

You won’t use that setting for comedy shows, but it’s superb for lengthy tech podcasts. As of version 2. Should you wish to support the app, though, there’s an entirely optional recurring patronage IAP.

Although Apple introduced iCloud Keychain in iOS 7, designed to securely store passwords and payment information, 1Password is a more powerful system. Along with integrating with Safari, it can be used to hold identities, secure notes, network information and app licence details.

It’s also cross-platform, meaning it will work with Windows and Android. And since 1Password is a standalone app, accessing and editing your information is fast and efficient.

The core app is free — the company primarily makes its money on the desktop. It’s interesting to watch the evolution of an app. Starting out on iPad, Paper was something of a design industry darling, offering a beautiful and stylish, if ultimately slightly limited, digital notebook of sorts.

Then it went free, the developer positioning Paper as the perfect app to use with its Pencil stylus. But the latest update not only brings the app to iPhone it also radically reimagines and expands it.

Alongside existing sketch tools, you now get notes and the means to add photos, transforming Paper from nice-to-have to essential. Back in, Jorge Colombo did some deft iPhone finger painting using Brushes, and the result became a New Yorker cover.

It was a turning point for iOS and suitably handy ammunition for tech bores who’d been drearily banging on about the fact an iPhone could never be used for proper work. The app sadly stagnated, but was made open source and returned as Brushes Redux.

Now free, it’s still a first-rate art app, with a simple layers system, straightforward controls, and a magnificent brush editor that starts you off with a random creation and enables you to mess about with all manner of properties, from density to jitter.

We keep hearing about how important coding will be to the future of everything. That’s all very well, unless code makes about as much sense to you as the most exotic of foreign languages.

The idea behind Lrn is to gently ease you in. Through friendly copy and simple quizzes, you gradually gain confidence across a range of languages. The science of sleep is something few people delve into.

But you know some days that you wake up and feel awful, even if you think you’ve had a decent night’s sleep. Sleep Cycle might be able to tell you why. It analyses you while you sleep, using sound or motion, and provides detailed statistics when you wake.

Additionally, it’ll constantly figure out what phase of sleep you’re in, attempting to wake you at the best possible time, in a gentle, pleasing manner. That probably all sounds a bit woo-woo, but here’s the thing: Developer Pixite is best known for its eye-popping filter apps, and so Assembly was quite the surprise.

The app is all about building vector art from shapes. Individual components are dropped on to the canvas, and can then be grouped or have styles applied.

It feels a bit like the iPhone equivalent of playing with felt shapes, but you soon realise that surprisingly complex compositions are possible, not least when you view the ‘inspirations’ tab or start messing about with the ‘remix’ projects.

For free, you get loads of stuff to play with, but inexpensive IAP unlocks all kinds of bundles with new themed shape sets to explore. It’s interesting to see how far the App Store has come.

Time was, Apple banned apps that gave you the chance to build prototypes. Now, Marvel is welcomed by Apple, and is entirely free. Using the app, you can build on photographed sketches, Photoshop documents, or on-screen scribbles.

Buttons can be added, and screens can be stitched together. Once you’re done, your prototype can be shared. If you’re not sure where to start, check out existing prototypes made by the Marvel community.

The Weather Underground app or ‘Wunderground’ to your iPhone, which sounds like an oddly dark Disney film is one of those products that flings in everything but the kitchen sink yet somehow remains usable.

Whatever your particular interest in the weather, you’re covered, through a slew of ’tiles’ which can be moved or disabled to suit on a huge scrolling page. At the top, you get a nicely designed tile detailing current conditions and showing a local map.

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Each has a different color, name and icon. Tap a timer and it starts, tap again to pause, or double-tap to reset. You also have plenty of preferences to delve into, including adjusting the default workspace.

There are loads of to-do apps on the App Store, but Productive has a different goal: You create habits within the app that are designed to be simple and assigned to a period of the day, making for straightforward but flexible planning.

Bright icons atop a deep gray background make your list simple to browse, and the calendar pages ensure tracking progress is a breeze. You can add iOS reminders to any item, too, although we preferred regularly visiting the app — a nice habit in itself.

MuseCam dispenses with the gimmickry seen in many iPhone camera apps, instead concentrating on manual control over shutter, ISO, white balance and focus. There’s no means to use a volume button for the shutter, nor RAW support, but otherwise it’s a solid camera.

The app is also an editor. You select a Camera Roll item, add film-inspired filter presets, and make further adjustments. Again, this feels like serious fare, but MuseCam wisely provides enough tools for pro-oriented iPhone photographers while remaining accessible enough for newcomers.

Interestingly, edits made on Camera Roll items remain accessible in MuseCam regardless of whether you export your final work, meaning you can later return to and update in-progress projects.

All in all, MuseCam feels refined and mature. That it’s free bar the option of splashing out on additional presets by way of IAP and also ad-free is remarkable. With VR glasses strapping your iPhone to your face, the experience is at once deeply strange and excitingly varied.

Smartly, the app also works as a standard degree video, which might not have the same immersive clout, but remains impressive all the same. Google and Apple may be rivals, but that doesn’t stop them building on each other’s work, as evidenced in Motion Stills, an app which takes the idea of Live Photos and runs with it.

Putting your Live Photos through Motion Stills adds Google’s stabilization technology to them, reducing the amount of visible camera shake, but that’s just the beginning. If you like the idea – but not the reality – of Live Photos then Motion Stills is the app for you, and you’re not limited to using it for new images – you can also fix up any Live Photos you’ve already taken.

If you lack the patience for working with full-on stop motion apps, but nonetheless fancy yourself as a mini-Aardman, Loop by Seedling is just the ticket. You shoot frames using your camera, and can handily overlay your previous photo in semi-transparent form, to ensure everything is properly lined up.

Once you’re done, you can play your photos as an animation, where tools are available to adjust the frame rate, add a filter, and mess about with grid collages, creating a Warhol-like animated GIF to share.

The interface is a bit opaque — quite a lot of controls need to be ‘discovered’ before you become comfortable with using this app. VPNs have become commonplace in a world where countries routinely block internet access to key content.

In some cases, you may merely be blocked from accessing media libraries; elsewhere, even news and social media may be beyond reach. The idea behind Opera VPN is to enable anyone to access otherwise inaccessible online content, entirely for free.

You get a small selection of regions to choose from, after which point your iPhone effectively thinks it’s in whatever country you selected. Although it won’t unlock all overseas services Netflix, notably, is wise to VPNs these days, it’s at the very least a good first place to try if you find you can’t get at a particular corner of the internet.

From the brains behind game-like language-learning app Duolingo comes Tinycards. The aim is to enable people to memorize anything by way of friendly flashcard sets. Duolingo itself offers a number of sets based around language, history and geography.

Smartly, though, anyone can create and publish a set, which has led to hundreds of decks about all kinds of subjects, from renaissance art to retro computing.

The memorizing bit is based around minutes-long drills. This being a Google app, some of the smart bits are somewhat reliant on you being ensconced in the Google ecosystem — reservations need to be sucked in from Gmail, for example.

Everything happens entirely automatically — you just select a character and background, gurn into the camera, watch a seemingly sentient floating hamburger mirror your very expression, and have a little sit down to think about the terrifying advance of technology.

For those not freaked out by the hamburger to the point that they hurl their iPhones into the sea, FaceRig provides plenty of characters, unlocked using tokens earned through regular use or bought using IAP.

One-time darling of the digital check-in crowd, Foursquare in reworked its app to focus entirely on local search. Although this irked fans who’d been there since the beginning, it’s hard to criticize the app we’ve been left with.

On iPhone, you start with a search field, beneath which sits a handy list of relatively local places of interest. Tap an item and you gain access to a photo gallery, basic details, and a slew of reviews.

In the main, Foursquare is quite obsessed with food, drink and nightlife, but the ‘fun’ and ‘more’ categories house plenty of additional places to visit, from gig venues and cinemas to rather more sedate options like parks and historic sites.

Filters and ‘tastes’ options within the app’s settings enable you to further hone down recommended choices, and anything you fancy reminding yourself of on a more permanent basis can be added to a custom list.

When you see an app describe itself as a ‘workout and kitchen timer’, you might wonder what its developers get up to. The app itself is extremely user-friendly. You get three types of timer – single-use, stopwatch, and reusable.

The last of those can have one or more steps. This means you can, for example, devise an exercise routine, and Timeglass will methodically work its way through the steps, optionally barking each one’s name or playing an alert noise.

Otherwise, this is an excellent timer app, and it’s also properly free, entirely lacking IAP. Although most fans want to cheer on their soccer team by hollering from the stands or, second best, yelling at a TV in a pub, that’s not always possible.

When you’re otherwise busy, Onefootball is a great means of keeping track of your favorites. The app’s a cinch to set up. Choose your teams, allow Onefootball to send notifications, and then let the app work its magic.

On match days, you’ll be notified of every goal, which, depending on your team’s fortunes, may make you thrill at or dread hearing the notification sound. If you at any point need a little more detail, venture into the app and you’ll discover everything from live tickers to customized news feeds.

If you like the idea of editing home movies but are a modern-day being with no time or attention span, try Quik. The app automates the entire process, enabling you to create beautiful videos with a few taps and show off to your friends without needing talent – surely the epitome of today’s hashtag generation.

All you need do is select some videos and photos, and choose a style. Quik then edits them into a great-looking video you can share with friends and family. But if your inner filmmaker hankers for a little more control, you can adjust the style, music, format and pace, along with trimming clips, reordering items, and adding titles to get the effect you desire.

Cementing its friendly nature, Quik offers a little pairs minigame for you to mess about with while the app renders your masterpiece. And there’s even a weekly ‘For You’ video Quik compiles without you lifting a finger.

We’ve seen quite a few apps that try to turn your photos into art, but none manage it with quite the same raw ability as Prisma. The app is almost disarmingly simple to use: The app within a few seconds then transforms your photo into a miniature Picasso or Munch, and it’s instantly better than most of us could ever hope to achieve with Photoshop.

On trying Prisma with a range of imagery, we found it almost never comes up with a duff result thanks to some insanely smart processing. But if you find the effects a bit jarring, a slide of your finger can soften your chosen filter prior to sharing your masterpiece online.

Our only criticism is the app’s fairly low-res output, making Prisma pics only suitable for screen use – but it’s a real must-have. It snaps retro pixelated black and white photos, with dithering right out of Mac co-creator Bill Atkinson’s playbook.

But what really sets BitCam apart is its authenticity. Tap the settings button and a window zooms in, using the same effect Mac old hands will remember from the s. Even the interface apes old-school Macs, from the checkboxes and OK button to the trashcan that appears after you take a photo.

There are, though, some concessions to post living: The camera sitting inside your iPhone is pretty amazing. In fact, plenty of people think it’s too amazing, the clarity and purity of digital shots having lost the ‘character’ found in photography of old.

Retrica brings a sense of creativity and randomness to iPhone snaps – and more besides. Filters are Retrica’s main trick. You can manually select one from a list which can be managed, for faster access to favorites or try your luck by stabbing the shuffle button.

A selected filter’s strength can be adjusted, but there’s sadly no quick ‘filter off’ switch. The filters, though, are varied and interesting, and you can optionally add a blur and vignette.

It’s also possible to apply Retrica filters to shots taken elsewhere, if you prefer taking ‘clean’ pics and messing around with them later. Retrica also plays with time. You can take multi-shots, your photos subsequently being stitched together on a grid there are well over a dozen options to choose from, or played in sequence as an exportable GIF.

Alternatively, hold the shutter and the app starts recording video, using your chosen filter. For five dollarpounds, we’d have written a glowing review about Retrica, but for free this is an astonishing gift – a superb and unmissable creative camera app.

If you used to sit there at school, doodling flick-animation masterpieces in the corner of your jotter, Animatic is the iPhone equivalent. You use simple tools to scribble on a small canvas, and then build your animation frame-by-frame.

The app uses a basic onion-skin approach, meaning you can see the previous few frames faintly behind the current one, ensuring whatever you draw doesn’t lurch all over the place. Once you’re done, you can adjust the animation speed of your creation and export it to video or GIF.

Given that you’re scribbling with what amounts to the iPhone equivalent of felt pens, you won’t be crafting the next Pixar movie here. But Animatic is fun, a great way to get into animation, and a useful sketchpad for those already dabbling.

The app also includes a bunch of demos, showcasing what’s possible with a little time, effort and imagination. Plenty of apps claim they can get you making music in seconds, but Figure really means it.

The app’s heritage helps, as it comes from Propellerhead Software, creators of the legendary Reason and ReBirth. In Figure, though, working on loops and beats is stripped right back from what you’d find in those complex PC apps; instead, you tap out drums, and slide your finger around to fashion monster bass and playful leads.

Sounds can be tweaked or swapped out entirely at any point. Once you’re done, finished tracks can be uploaded and shared online. For serious musicians, there’s even Audiobus support.

There’s a tendency for weather apps to either bombard you with facts or try to be too clever with design Hello Weather, by contrast, simply wants to get you all the weather information you need, but nothing you don’t.

This focused approach doesn’t mean Hello Weather is an ugly app. On the contrary, it’s very smart, with a clean layout and readable graphs. Mostly, though, we’re fond of Hello Weather because it eschews complexity without limiting the information on offer.

The single-page view is split in three, covering current conditions, the next few hours, and the week’s forecast. The app doesn’t quite check off our entire wish-list – the lack of a rainfall radar or at least a precipitation prediction graph for the coming hour is a pity.

But as a free no-fuss weather app, Hello Weather is hard to beat. The idea behind Cheatsheet is to provide fast access to tiny chunks of information you never remember but really need to: Set-up is pleasingly straightforward.

Using the app, you add ‘cheats’ by selecting an icon and then typing your info nugget. When you’ve got yourself a number of ‘cheats’, they can be reordered as you see fit.

Once you’re done, the entire lot can be displayed on the Today widget or an Apple Watch. But the free version is nonetheless useful and generous, along with making really good use of the Today view on your phone.

With the vast range of movies available at any given time, keeping track of what you’d like to see and what you’ve watched already isn’t easy. TodoMovies 4 aims to simplify the process and aid discovery.

The app starts off with the discovery bit, having you check out lists that range from Academy Award nominees to those with the ‘greatest gun fights of all time’.

Beyond this, you can browse by genre, explore upcoming films and what’s on in theatres, or perform a search for something specific. Selecting a film loads artwork, and most have a trailer. Watched films can be removed or sent to your Watched list, whereupon they can be rated.

This mix of focus and friendliness – along with some very smart design – makes this app a no-brainer download for movie buffs. Snapseed is an extremely versatile photo editor for iPhone.

You choose from a number of tools and filters, and proceed to pinch and swipe your way to a transformed image. You get all the basics — cropping, rotation, healing brushes, and the like — but the filters are where you can get really creative.

There are blurs, photographic effects, and more extreme options like ‘grunge’ and ‘grainy film’, which can add plenty of atmosphere to your photographs. The vast majority of effects are tweakable, mostly by dragging up and down on the canvas to select a parameter and then horizontally to adjust its strength.

Brilliantly, the app also records applied effects as separate layers, each of which remains fully editable until you decide to save your image and work on something else. It’s no secret that Apple Maps doesn’t have the best reputation, although it has got better in recent times.

Fortunately, Google Maps is a free download, and a far better solution than the old Google Maps app as well, thanks to the inclusion of turn-by-turn navigation and – in some cities – public transport directions.

Handily, it can also save chunks of maps for offline use – great when you’re heading somewhere with poor connectivity. It’s an easy way to supercharge your iPhone’s mapping capabilities and one of the first apps you should grab for the iPhone 7.

If you live in or visit one of the supported cities which include London, Paris, Berlin and New York, Citymapper is an essential download, assuming you want to find your way around more easily. It’ll zero in on your location and then intelligently get you from A to B, providing all kinds of travel options and routing, and, where relevant, live times for transit.

Sometimes with apps, it’s the seemingly little things that make a big difference. With Overcast, for example, you get a perfectly decent podcast app that does everything you’d expect: But where Overcast excels is in attempting to save you time and improve your listening experience.

Effects which can be assigned per-podcast provide the smartest playback speed-up we’ve heard, voice boost for improving the clarity of talky shows, and smart speed.

The last of those attempts to shorten silences. You won’t use that setting for comedy shows, but it’s superb for lengthy tech podcasts. As of version 2. Should you wish to support the app, though, there’s an entirely optional recurring patronage IAP.

Although Apple introduced iCloud Keychain in iOS 7, designed to securely store passwords and payment information, 1Password is a more powerful system. Along with integrating with Safari, it can be used to hold identities, secure notes, network information and app licence details.

It’s also cross-platform, meaning it will work with Windows and Android. And since 1Password is a standalone app, accessing and editing your information is fast and efficient.

The core app is free — the company primarily makes its money on the desktop. It’s interesting to watch the evolution of an app. Starting out on iPad, Paper was something of a design industry darling, offering a beautiful and stylish, if ultimately slightly limited, digital notebook of sorts.

Then it went free, the developer positioning Paper as the perfect app to use with its Pencil stylus. But the latest update not only brings the app to iPhone it also radically reimagines and expands it.

Alongside existing sketch tools, you now get notes and the means to add photos, transforming Paper from nice-to-have to essential. Back in, Jorge Colombo did some deft iPhone finger painting using Brushes, and the result became a New Yorker cover.

It was a turning point for iOS and suitably handy ammunition for tech bores who’d been drearily banging on about the fact an iPhone could never be used for proper work.

The app sadly stagnated, but was made open source and returned as Brushes Redux. Now free, it’s still a first-rate art app, with a simple layers system, straightforward controls, and a magnificent brush editor that starts you off with a random creation and enables you to mess about with all manner of properties, from density to jitter.

We keep hearing about how important coding will be to the future of everything. That’s all very well, unless code makes about as much sense to you as the most exotic of foreign languages.

The idea behind Lrn is to gently ease you in. Through friendly copy and simple quizzes, you gradually gain confidence across a range of languages. The science of sleep is something few people delve into.

Side by side against the Motorola Photon on the same Wi-Fi network, the iPhone 4S consistently loaded pages a few seconds faster. The great browsing speed comes in part from the new iOS 5, which we found made browsing much faster on all iPhones.

It also comes in part from the new dual-core A5 processor, the same one used in the iPad 2. There aren’t a lot of third-party apps that take advantage of the dual-core processor and new GPU yet, but it’s key to some of the phone’s best experiences, such as the p camera, AirPlay video streaming to Apple TV devices, and the browser.

And remember that on Sprint, unlike every other iPhone carrier, you get truly unlimited cellular data right now. That’s a good deal for heavy users, even if the data connection is slower than on other carriers.

There’s one exception to the unlimited data policy: He’s the head of our Fastest Mobile Networks project, one of the hosts of the daily PCMag Live Web show and speaks frequently in mass media on cell-phone-related issues.

Segan is also a multiple award-winning travel writer, having contributed The iPhone X has a few quirks developers need to address; these apps are ahead of the curve. The iPhone X has a very unusual L-shaped, dual-cell battery.

Here’s what it might mean for the futur Many apps need to be updated to look good, or even to work at all, on the iPhone X. PCMag reviews products independently, but we may earn affiliate commissions from buying links on this page.

Pros Excellent Web speeds. On-screen keyboard is quite small. Motorola Photon 4G Sprint. Top Previous 1 2 Next. You can send individual messages within the app or build or view Snapchat Stories, which contain a series of posts.

Reading on the internet can be an overwhelming experience with social networks, messaging, email, and personal assistants all serving up possible reads. Instapaper and Pocket help tame that information deluge.

Pocket tends to be best with multimedia while Instapaper guns for the perfect reading experience no matter what. Whether you’re a big driver or just going on a long road trip, you should check out Waze.

The app knows how fast users are traveling on the road and redirects you around traffic mid-trip, ultimately shortening your commute. Waze tracks more than just traffic; it also alerts you to construction, accidents, red-light cameras, and even police ahead on your route.

Beer lovers, keep track of every brew you drink with Untappd, a mobile social network of sorts. Check in different beers, rate them, and even send a virtual “cheers! Like Foursquare, you can earn badges for different types of check-ins, upload photos, find nearby bars with great selections, and share what you’re drinking with friends.

It’s not raining now, but should you bring your umbrella with you for a quick coffee run across the street? The app is able to predict weather for your exact location, not just your city, down to the minute.

The app also features stunningly beautiful maps bound to bring out everyone’s inner weather nerd.

YouTube Music lets you watch and listen to a nearly endless catalog in an app designed for music discovery. Enjoy music for free with ads, or get YouTube Red. Create, edit, and collaborate with others on documents from your iPod, iPhone, or iPad with the free Google Docs app.

With Google Docs you can: Poshmark is the leading marketplace to buy and sell fashion. Regardless of your email address, you can experience the Yahoo Mail app’s beautiful design, easy-to-use interface and lightning Order ahead and get your favorite food in 3 easy ways: Get daily or weekly deals and Enjoy all your TV in one place with a new Hulu experience — more personalized and intuitive than ever before.

Manage all the ways you send, receive, and spend money at a glance — download the PayPal payment app today. Browse our online inventory of millions of products like the newest phones, tablets, and Do your banking right from your mobile device You can manage your accounts, make deposits, find ATMs and more.

To start, just enroll in Chase Join millions of brain trainers worldwide and see what the fuss is all about. Our award-winning app saves you time and money. Get millions of items delivered in as little as 2 days.

Just install the app and stream the hit series Riverdale, along with The Flash, Supergirl, Pay in store Save Translate text in images instantly by just pointing Want to enter a world of suspense and horror but not up for a long read?

Well, now you can! Every Yarn story is told as a Customers in the US can also use this app to watch videos purchased Life is the world’s leading realtime, location-sharing app, and is the best way to coordinate with family and friends.

Get automatic notifications when your family comes and goes from home, work and school, and The latest sneakers, products and events reserved for you, shopping directly on the app and behind the scenes content from No more searching multiple sites and sources for deals, Flipp gives you everything you need to save from holiday gifts to We all have a voice.

Find yours with Sing! Duet with major artists like Ed Sheeran and Luis Fonsi. Karaoke solo, with friends, or singers of all levels around the world. Sound and look your best with our Marco Polo is a face-to-face messaging app for one-to-one and group conversations—bringing family and friends closer than ever with genuine conversations and moments shared.

All Your Favorite Music. All Your Favorite Stations. Listen to music you love. Stream unlimited music, thousands of radio stations and podcasts all in one app. Wishbone is your go-to for comparing anything your heart desires!

Wishbone covers everything from fashion, celebrities, humor, music and pretty much anything you can think about. Join your friends and popular celebrities From Bruno Mars to Mozart, play the hottest songs!

Relax your soul with beautiful sounds of piano while playing your favorite tunes on original 1 piano rhythm game. Capital One Mobile lets you manage your credit cards, bank accounts, home and auto loans anywhere, anytime, from one place on your iPhone or iPad.

Check account balances, pay bills, view payment activity and transaction Colorfy is the original and best coloring book for adults! Download now, it’s FREE! Have fun with the best coloring game. Start now your free coloring book therapy The Skype you know and love has an all-new design, supercharged with a ton of new features and new ways to stay connected with the people you care about most.

What can I do with Skype? Ever wanted to shop everything in one place, at one time? Dropbox is a creative collaboration space designed to reduce busywork, bring your files together in one central place, and safely sync them across all your devices—so you can access them anytime, anywhere.

Manage your finances; make check deposits, transfer funds, and pay bills, all within the app. Use Hangouts to keep in touch. Message friends, start free video or voice calls, and hop on a conversation with one person or a group.

Say more with photos, stickers, and emoji. Get your free credit scores, reports and more on Credit Karma. Create fun, one-of-a-kind layouts by remixing your own photos and sharing them with your friends.

Choose photos from your camera roll—or use the built-in Photo Booth to take spur-of-the-moment shots—and instantly Make your lock screen come alive. Optimized for iPhone 8, 7, 6s and iOS Discover unique collection of interactive and incredible Connect to opportunity and tap into your professional potential with the LinkedIn app.

The app makes it easier to discover, connect and nurture relationships with people that matter, search and apply for jobs, and Download the best app for easily editing photos and creating photo grids and collages for the fall season.

Choose from hundreds of photo grid layout and sizes, exclusive stickers, background patterns and textures, New Pictures Every Day! Recolor is the world’s favourite Coloring Book on Mobile!

Join millions of people rediscovering the relaxation of coloring. Take it with you. Add tone to your conversation. Sarahah helps you in discovering your strengths and areas for improvement by receiving honest feedback from your employees and your friends in a private manner Kik is way more than just messaging.

No phone numbers, just pick a username. Build your pizza just the way you like it or choose one of our specialty pizzas. Add items from the rest of our oven-baked menu including Duolingo is Apple’s iPhone App of the Year!

Duolingo is the world’s most popular way to learn languages with over million users. Super fun and free — Spanish, French, German, Italian, The Weather Channel App for iPhone is your best option for accurate forecasts and timely local weather alerts.

Make confident decisions this fall, whether you are planning for the day, the entire week or the next 15 days! Tumblr is a place to discover and post about stuff you love, and join communities of people who love that same stuff.

What can I post on Tumblr? Photos, videos, live videos, songs, text—pretty Every HOOKED story is told as a bite-sized text message conversation, as if you were reading someone else’s chat history.

Content can be transferred over the air without Buying and selling on your mobile phone is easy. Upload an image and start selling in seconds, or search Want AEOstyle on the go?

Come get it, BAE. This trusty app puts our entire apparel collection at your fingertips, anywhere you wander. Join 5 million people on tbh! The only anonymous app with positive vibes.

And no—they don’t roast you like other Order food delivery from the widest selection of restaurants near you! The Apple Store app provides a more personal way to shop for the latest Apple products and accessories.

Get recommendations based on the Apple products you already own. With its large display and the Apple Pencil, the iPad seems the natural home for a coloring app like Pigment. Even on the smaller screen, it excels.

You get quick access to a set of top-notch coloring tools, and a range of intricate illustrations to work on. Sure, buy a subscription and you gain access to a much bigger range; but for free, you still get an awful lot.

Amusingly, the app also offers options for staying inside the lines. The iPhone version of GarageBand has always been ambitious. Smart piano strips have been expanded to all keyboard instruments, helping anyone to play perfect melodies.

And Audio Unit support exists to load third-party synths directly inside of GarageBand, similar to how plug-ins work on desktop music-making apps. Because of these things, GarageBand is now even more suited to musicians of all skill levels — although be aware on smaller screens that the app can be a touch fiddly, what with there being so much going on.

With Instapaper, such problems vanish. The app is effectively time-shifting for the web. You load articles and it saves them for later. Even better, it strips cruft, leaving only the content in a mobile-optimized view ideal for iPhone.

Should you end up with a large archive, articles can be filtered or organized into folders. Want to find something specific? Full-text search has you covered. The idea behind Adobe Photoshop Fix is to enable you to rapidly retouch and restore photos on your iPhone — using the power of Photoshop.

But Photoshop Fix has some serious power within its straightforward interface, too, as evidenced by excellent vignette, defocus, and color tools. The best bit, though, is Liquify. Using this feature, you can mash a photo to bits or make really subtle changes, depending on the subject matter.

Unsurprisingly, Wikipedia is an app for browsing Wikipedia, the massive online encyclopedia that makes all paper-based equivalents green with envy. Wikipedia gets the basics right: Finding the text a bit small?

You can resize it in two taps. The free version offers a small selection of sounds to soothe your soul — white noise, rain, wind, thunder, and wind chimes. To create some ambience, you simply drag one or more noise icons to an on-screen grid; the items towards the top play at a higher volume, and those towards the right become more complex in nature.

Many apps attempt to emulate film stock, but most go for an over-saturated, larger-than-life take on old-school photography. By contrast, Filmborn is all about realism, arming you with tools to make you a better photographer.

The icon-heavy interface takes some getting used to; but once you know where everything is, Filmborn quickly replaces the stock camera app — or any other app you had previously favored.

Much of this is down to features such as manual controls and a superb blown highlights preview, which covers problematic areas of your potential snap in red. But even in its free incarnation, Filmborn is an essential download.

This music-creation app manages the tricky combination of being broadly approachable to the masses yet providing real scope for advanced composition. The app automatically loops recordings, can align notes to the beat, and gives you options for adjusting tempo, scale, and effects.

Its main differentiator over the competition is speed. Once you crack how it works, you can very rapidly fashion loops comprising several overlaid drum tracks, bass, keyboard arpeggios, and lush chords.

Easy Chords will play chords for the current scale when you tap a single note. Want to tweak things? Delve into the piano roll and move individual notes. For free, this is astonishing stuff. The only limit is the available sounds, but these, naturally, can be expanded via various affordable IAPs.

You might not associate taking medication with a hip and cool iPhone, but technology can be a boon to anyone with such requirements. Flexible preferences enable you to set up cross-device sync, push notifications, and to export data – and reminding users to refill will be a real help too.

That the app is free is generous, given the job it does — and how well it does it. MultiTimer, as its name might suggest, gives you multiple timers that you can set going simultaneously.

Each has a different color, name and icon. Tap a timer and it starts, tap again to pause, or double-tap to reset. You also have plenty of preferences to delve into, including adjusting the default workspace.

There are loads of to-do apps on the App Store, but Productive has a different goal: You create habits within the app that are designed to be simple and assigned to a period of the day, making for straightforward but flexible planning.

Bright icons atop a deep gray background make your list simple to browse, and the calendar pages ensure tracking progress is a breeze. You can add iOS reminders to any item, too, although we preferred regularly visiting the app — a nice habit in itself.

MuseCam dispenses with the gimmickry seen in many iPhone camera apps, instead concentrating on manual control over shutter, ISO, white balance and focus.

There’s no means to use a volume button for the shutter, nor RAW support, but otherwise it’s a solid camera. The app is also an editor. You select a Camera Roll item, add film-inspired filter presets, and make further adjustments.

Again, this feels like serious fare, but MuseCam wisely provides enough tools for pro-oriented iPhone photographers while remaining accessible enough for newcomers. Interestingly, edits made on Camera Roll items remain accessible in MuseCam regardless of whether you export your final work, meaning you can later return to and update in-progress projects.

All in all, MuseCam feels refined and mature. That it’s free bar the option of splashing out on additional presets by way of IAP and also ad-free is remarkable. With VR glasses strapping your iPhone to your face, the experience is at once deeply strange and excitingly varied.

Smartly, the app also works as a standard degree video, which might not have the same immersive clout, but remains impressive all the same. Google and Apple may be rivals, but that doesn’t stop them building on each other’s work, as evidenced in Motion Stills, an app which takes the idea of Live Photos and runs with it.

Putting your Live Photos through Motion Stills adds Google’s stabilization technology to them, reducing the amount of visible camera shake, but that’s just the beginning.

If you like the idea – but not the reality – of Live Photos then Motion Stills is the app for you, and you’re not limited to using it for new images – you can also fix up any Live Photos you’ve already taken.

If you lack the patience for working with full-on stop motion apps, but nonetheless fancy yourself as a mini-Aardman, Loop by Seedling is just the ticket. You shoot frames using your camera, and can handily overlay your previous photo in semi-transparent form, to ensure everything is properly lined up.

Once you’re done, you can play your photos as an animation, where tools are available to adjust the frame rate, add a filter, and mess about with grid collages, creating a Warhol-like animated GIF to share.

The interface is a bit opaque — quite a lot of controls need to be ‘discovered’ before you become comfortable with using this app. VPNs have become commonplace in a world where countries routinely block internet access to key content.

In some cases, you may merely be blocked from accessing media libraries; elsewhere, even news and social media may be beyond reach. The idea behind Opera VPN is to enable anyone to access otherwise inaccessible online content, entirely for free.

You get a small selection of regions to choose from, after which point your iPhone effectively thinks it’s in whatever country you selected. Although it won’t unlock all overseas services Netflix, notably, is wise to VPNs these days, it’s at the very least a good first place to try if you find you can’t get at a particular corner of the internet.

From the brains behind game-like language-learning app Duolingo comes Tinycards. The aim is to enable people to memorize anything by way of friendly flashcard sets.

Duolingo itself offers a number of sets based around language, history and geography. Smartly, though, anyone can create and publish a set, which has led to hundreds of decks about all kinds of subjects, from renaissance art to retro computing.

The memorizing bit is based around minutes-long drills. This being a Google app, some of the smart bits are somewhat reliant on you being ensconced in the Google ecosystem — reservations need to be sucked in from Gmail, for example.

Everything happens entirely automatically — you just select a character and background, gurn into the camera, watch a seemingly sentient floating hamburger mirror your very expression, and have a little sit down to think about the terrifying advance of technology.

For those not freaked out by the hamburger to the point that they hurl their iPhones into the sea, FaceRig provides plenty of characters, unlocked using tokens earned through regular use or bought using IAP.

One-time darling of the digital check-in crowd, Foursquare in reworked its app to focus entirely on local search. Although this irked fans who’d been there since the beginning, it’s hard to criticize the app we’ve been left with.

On iPhone, you start with a search field, beneath which sits a handy list of relatively local places of interest. Tap an item and you gain access to a photo gallery, basic details, and a slew of reviews.

In the main, Foursquare is quite obsessed with food, drink and nightlife, but the ‘fun’ and ‘more’ categories house plenty of additional places to visit, from gig venues and cinemas to rather more sedate options like parks and historic sites.

Filters and ‘tastes’ options within the app’s settings enable you to further hone down recommended choices, and anything you fancy reminding yourself of on a more permanent basis can be added to a custom list.

When you see an app describe itself as a ‘workout and kitchen timer’, you might wonder what its developers get up to. The app itself is extremely user-friendly. You get three types of timer – single-use, stopwatch, and reusable.

The last of those can have one or more steps. This means you can, for example, devise an exercise routine, and Timeglass will methodically work its way through the steps, optionally barking each one’s name or playing an alert noise.

Otherwise, this is an excellent timer app, and it’s also properly free, entirely lacking IAP. Although most fans want to cheer on their soccer team by hollering from the stands or, second best, yelling at a TV in a pub, that’s not always possible.

When you’re otherwise busy, Onefootball is a great means of keeping track of your favorites. The app’s a cinch to set up. Choose your teams, allow Onefootball to send notifications, and then let the app work its magic.

On match days, you’ll be notified of every goal, which, depending on your team’s fortunes, may make you thrill at or dread hearing the notification sound.

If you at any point need a little more detail, venture into the app and you’ll discover everything from live tickers to customized news feeds. If you like the idea of editing home movies but are a modern-day being with no time or attention span, try Quik.

The app automates the entire process, enabling you to create beautiful videos with a few taps and show off to your friends without needing talent – surely the epitome of today’s hashtag generation.

All you need do is select some videos and photos, and choose a style. Quik then edits them into a great-looking video you can share with friends and family. But if your inner filmmaker hankers for a little more control, you can adjust the style, music, format and pace, along with trimming clips, reordering items, and adding titles to get the effect you desire.

Cementing its friendly nature, Quik offers a little pairs minigame for you to mess about with while the app renders your masterpiece. And there’s even a weekly ‘For You’ video Quik compiles without you lifting a finger.

We’ve seen quite a few apps that try to turn your photos into art, but none manage it with quite the same raw ability as Prisma. The app is almost disarmingly simple to use: The app within a few seconds then transforms your photo into a miniature Picasso or Munch, and it’s instantly better than most of us could ever hope to achieve with Photoshop.

On trying Prisma with a range of imagery, we found it almost never comes up with a duff result thanks to some insanely smart processing. But if you find the effects a bit jarring, a slide of your finger can soften your chosen filter prior to sharing your masterpiece online.

Our only criticism is the app’s fairly low-res output, making Prisma pics only suitable for screen use – but it’s a real must-have. It snaps retro pixelated black and white photos, with dithering right out of Mac co-creator Bill Atkinson’s playbook.

But what really sets BitCam apart is its authenticity. Tap the settings button and a window zooms in, using the same effect Mac old hands will remember from the s.

Even the interface apes old-school Macs, from the checkboxes and OK button to the trashcan that appears after you take a photo. There are, though, some concessions to post living: The camera sitting inside your iPhone is pretty amazing.

In fact, plenty of people think it’s too amazing, the clarity and purity of digital shots having lost the ‘character’ found in photography of old. Retrica brings a sense of creativity and randomness to iPhone snaps – and more besides.

Filters are Retrica’s main trick. You can manually select one from a list which can be managed, for faster access to favorites or try your luck by stabbing the shuffle button.

A selected filter’s strength can be adjusted, but there’s sadly no quick ‘filter off’ switch. The filters, though, are varied and interesting, and you can optionally add a blur and vignette.

It’s also possible to apply Retrica filters to shots taken elsewhere, if you prefer taking ‘clean’ pics and messing around with them later. Retrica also plays with time. You can take multi-shots, your photos subsequently being stitched together on a grid there are well over a dozen options to choose from, or played in sequence as an exportable GIF.

Alternatively, hold the shutter and the app starts recording video, using your chosen filter. For five dollarpounds, we’d have written a glowing review about Retrica, but for free this is an astonishing gift – a superb and unmissable creative camera app.

If you used to sit there at school, doodling flick-animation masterpieces in the corner of your jotter, Animatic is the iPhone equivalent. You use simple tools to scribble on a small canvas, and then build your animation frame-by-frame.

The app uses a basic onion-skin approach, meaning you can see the previous few frames faintly behind the current one, ensuring whatever you draw doesn’t lurch all over the place.

Once you’re done, you can adjust the animation speed of your creation and export it to video or GIF. Given that you’re scribbling with what amounts to the iPhone equivalent of felt pens, you won’t be crafting the next Pixar movie here.

But Animatic is fun, a great way to get into animation, and a useful sketchpad for those already dabbling. The app also includes a bunch of demos, showcasing what’s possible with a little time, effort and imagination.

Plenty of apps claim they can get you making music in seconds, but Figure really means it. The app’s heritage helps, as it comes from Propellerhead Software, creators of the legendary Reason and ReBirth.

In Figure, though, working on loops and beats is stripped right back from what you’d find in those complex PC apps; instead, you tap out drums, and slide your finger around to fashion monster bass and playful leads.

Sounds can be tweaked or swapped out entirely at any point. Once you’re done, finished tracks can be uploaded and shared online. For serious musicians, there’s even Audiobus support.

There’s a tendency for weather apps to either bombard you with facts or try to be too clever with design Hello Weather, by contrast, simply wants to get you all the weather information you need, but nothing you don’t.

This focused approach doesn’t mean Hello Weather is an ugly app. On the contrary, it’s very smart, with a clean layout and readable graphs. Mostly, though, we’re fond of Hello Weather because it eschews complexity without limiting the information on offer.

The single-page view is split in three, covering current conditions, the next few hours, and the week’s forecast. The app doesn’t quite check off our entire wish-list – the lack of a rainfall radar or at least a precipitation prediction graph for the coming hour is a pity.

But as a free no-fuss weather app, Hello Weather is hard to beat. The idea behind Cheatsheet is to provide fast access to tiny chunks of information you never remember but really need to: Set-up is pleasingly straightforward.

Using the app, you add ‘cheats’ by selecting an icon and then typing your info nugget. When you’ve got yourself a number of ‘cheats’, they can be reordered as you see fit.

Once you’re done, the entire lot can be displayed on the Today widget or an Apple Watch. But the free version is nonetheless useful and generous, along with making really good use of the Today view on your phone.

With the vast range of movies available at any given time, keeping track of what you’d like to see and what you’ve watched already isn’t easy. TodoMovies 4 aims to simplify the process and aid discovery.

The app starts off with the discovery bit, having you check out lists that range from Academy Award nominees to those with the ‘greatest gun fights of all time’.

Beyond this, you can browse by genre, explore upcoming films and what’s on in theatres, or perform a search for something specific. Selecting a film loads artwork, and most have a trailer.

Watched films can be removed or sent to your Watched list, whereupon they can be rated. This mix of focus and friendliness – along with some very smart design – makes this app a no-brainer download for movie buffs.

Snapseed is an extremely versatile photo editor for iPhone. You choose from a number of tools and filters, and proceed to pinch and swipe your way to a transformed image.

You get all the basics — cropping, rotation, healing brushes, and the like — but the filters are where you can get really creative. There are blurs, photographic effects, and more extreme options like ‘grunge’ and ‘grainy film’, which can add plenty of atmosphere to your photographs.

The vast majority of effects are tweakable, mostly by dragging up and down on the canvas to select a parameter and then horizontally to adjust its strength. Brilliantly, the app also records applied effects as separate layers, each of which remains fully editable until you decide to save your image and work on something else.

It’s no secret that Apple Maps doesn’t have the best reputation, although it has got better in recent times. Fortunately, Google Maps is a free download, and a far better solution than the old Google Maps app as well, thanks to the inclusion of turn-by-turn navigation and – in some cities – public transport directions.

Handily, it can also save chunks of maps for offline use – great when you’re heading somewhere with poor connectivity. It’s an easy way to supercharge your iPhone’s mapping capabilities and one of the first apps you should grab for the iPhone 7.

If you live in or visit one of the supported cities which include London, Paris, Berlin and New York, Citymapper is an essential download, assuming you want to find your way around more easily.

It’ll zero in on your location and then intelligently get you from A to B, providing all kinds of travel options and routing, and, where relevant, live times for transit.

Sometimes with apps, it’s the seemingly little things that make a big difference. With Overcast, for example, you get a perfectly decent podcast app that does everything you’d expect: But where Overcast excels is in attempting to save you time and improve your listening experience.

Effects which can be assigned per-podcast provide the smartest playback speed-up we’ve heard, voice boost for improving the clarity of talky shows, and smart speed. The last of those attempts to shorten silences.

You won’t use that setting for comedy shows, but it’s superb for lengthy tech podcasts. As of version 2. Should you wish to support the app, though, there’s an entirely optional recurring patronage IAP.

Although Apple introduced iCloud Keychain in iOS 7, designed to securely store passwords and payment information, 1Password is a more powerful system. Along with integrating with Safari, it can be used to hold identities, secure notes, network information and app licence details.

It’s also cross-platform, meaning it will work with Windows and Android. And since 1Password is a standalone app, accessing and editing your information is fast and efficient.

The core app is free — the company primarily makes its money on the desktop. It’s interesting to watch the evolution of an app. Starting out on iPad, Paper was something of a design industry darling, offering a beautiful and stylish, if ultimately slightly limited, digital notebook of sorts.

Then it went free, the developer positioning Paper as the perfect app to use with its Pencil stylus. But the latest update not only brings the app to iPhone it also radically reimagines and expands it.

Alongside existing sketch tools, you now get notes and the means to add photos, transforming Paper from nice-to-have to essential. Back in, Jorge Colombo did some deft iPhone finger painting using Brushes, and the result became a New Yorker cover.

It was a turning point for iOS and suitably handy ammunition for tech bores who’d been drearily banging on about the fact an iPhone could never be used for proper work. The app sadly stagnated, but was made open source and returned as Brushes Redux.

Now free, it’s still a first-rate art app, with a simple layers system, straightforward controls, and a magnificent brush editor that starts you off with a random creation and enables you to mess about with all manner of properties, from density to jitter.

We keep hearing about how important coding will be to the future of everything. That’s all very well, unless code makes about as much sense to you as the most exotic of foreign languages.

The idea behind Lrn is to gently ease you in. Through friendly copy and simple quizzes, you gradually gain confidence across a range of languages. The science of sleep is something few people delve into.

But you know some days that you wake up and feel awful, even if you think you’ve had a decent night’s sleep. Sleep Cycle might be able to tell you why. It analyses you while you sleep, using sound or motion, and provides detailed statistics when you wake.

Additionally, it’ll constantly figure out what phase of sleep you’re in, attempting to wake you at the best possible time, in a gentle, pleasing manner. That probably all sounds a bit woo-woo, but here’s the thing: Developer Pixite is best known for its eye-popping filter apps, and so Assembly was quite the surprise.

The app is all about building vector art from shapes. Individual components are dropped on to the canvas, and can then be grouped or have styles applied. It feels a bit like the iPhone equivalent of playing with felt shapes, but you soon realise that surprisingly complex compositions are possible, not least when you view the ‘inspirations’ tab or start messing about with the ‘remix’ projects.

For free, you get loads of stuff to play with, but inexpensive IAP unlocks all kinds of bundles with new themed shape sets to explore. It’s interesting to see how far the App Store has come. Time was, Apple banned apps that gave you the chance to build prototypes.

Now, Marvel is welcomed by Apple, and is entirely free. Using the app, you can build on photographed sketches, Photoshop documents, or on-screen scribbles. Buttons can be added, and screens can be stitched together.

Once you’re done, your prototype can be shared. If you’re not sure where to start, check out existing prototypes made by the Marvel community. The Weather Underground app or ‘Wunderground’ to your iPhone, which sounds like an oddly dark Disney film is one of those products that flings in everything but the kitchen sink yet somehow remains usable.

Whatever your particular interest in the weather, you’re covered, through a slew of ’tiles’ which can be moved or disabled to suit on a huge scrolling page. At the top, you get a nicely designed tile detailing current conditions and showing a local map.

Tick and cross buttons lurk, asking for input regarding the app’s accuracy. During testing, we almost always tapped the tick — reassuring. Scroll, though, and you find yourself immersed in the kind of weather geekery that will send meteorological nuts into rapture.

There are rainfall and temperature graphs for the next day and hour, along with simpler forecasts for the week. You get details on humidity, pressure and dew point. Sunrise, sunset and moon timings are presented as stylish animations.

You can investigate local and global webcams and photos, and then head to the web if not satisfied with that deluge of data. On the iPad, Novation Launchpad is one of the best music apps suitable for absolutely anyone.

You get a bunch of pads, and tap them to trigger audio loops, which always sound great regardless of the combinations used. This isn’t making music per se, but you can get up a good head of steam while imagining yourself as a futuristic combination of electronic musician, DJ and mix genius.

On iPhone, it shouldn’t really work, the smaller screen not being as suited to tapping away at dozens of pads. But smart design from Novation proves otherwise. Effects lurk at the foot of the screen — tap one and a performance space slides in, covering half the screen, ready for you to stutter and filter your masterpiece.

As on the iPad, you can also record a live mix, which can be played back, shared and exported. This is a really great feature, adding optional permanence to your tapping exploits.

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Tap a timer and it starts, tap again to pause, or double-tap to reset. Amusingly, the app also offers options for staying inside the lines. Using this feature, you can mash a photo to bits or make really subtle changes, depending on the subject matter. Regardless of your email address, you can experience the Yahoo Mail app’s beautiful design, easy-to-use interface and lightning For example, take a snap on holiday and then add a video of your family waving to a loved one; or load a movie poster and unsubtly insert your head into the scene.

With the vast range of movies available at any given time, keeping track of what you’d like to see and what you’ve watched already isn’t easy. Get help with purchases. VPN is one of the best and easiest ways to access all your favorite online content for free. Turn your iPhone or iPad into a Kindle with the free Kindle app, and carry all your eBooks with you, wherever you go.

Previously split into ‘pro’ and ‘free’ versions, the developer now generously includes all the features in one free app. If you’re like most Americans, you make some calls, take some photos, and send some texts. Although you get the sense eBay’s designers can’t get through a month without redesigning their app, it’s always far superior to using the online auction site in a browser.

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You can also spend directly from the app with a free Visa debit card that can be delivered to your door Snapseed is an extremely versatile photo editor for iPhone. I was able to get data speeds to drop by gripping the phone from both ends in a bizarre two-handed clench, but really, nobody uses a phone that way. See…

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